Any tarantulas that should NOT be currently bred?

gypsy cola

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So I got a few adult females I am ready to knock up. I am aware some of these tarantulas may be muddled up when it comes to genetics, name changes, and too many hybrids existing.

So I am asking what tarantulas should be put on hold when it comes to breeding?
A few examples from the Brachypelma comes to mind.
 

EulersK

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I'd say the Nicaraguan B. albopilosum. Between @Exoskeleton Invertebrates and @Blue Jaye, there are 8 gravid females that we know of. The market is going to be flooded with those very soon. I wouldn't pair that species just for the sake of trying to get rid of them.
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

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I'd say the Nicaraguan B. albopilosum. Between @Exoskeleton Invertebrates and @Blue Jaye, there are 8 gravid females that we know of. The market is going to be flooded with those very soon. I wouldn't pair that species just for the sake of trying to get rid of them.
I have gravid females but I'm only going to allowed two of my best females to produce a sac. I don't want to many females to have babies by the same male, so one male two females. The rest of the females that the male mated with was just pure sex nothing more.

I have other immature males that will be maturing later this year.
 

EulersK

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I have gravid females but I'm only going to allowed two of my best females to produce a sac. I don't want to many females to have babies by the same male, so one male two females. The rest of the females that the male mated with was just pure sex nothing more.

I have other immature males that will be maturing later this year.
But what if they produce a sac?
 

gypsy cola

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What about Brachypelma vagans? Should these be avoided when it comes to breeding?

This is a pretty muddy species.
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

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But what if they produce a sac?
If I kept them humid and higher temperatures sure they could produce a sac. Right now all are dry no humidity and 5 of my females are already gravid, not ready yet to set up the two in the right conditions for them to produce a sac. Still feeding them heavily.
 

EulersK

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What about Brachypelma vagans? Should these be avoided when it comes to breeding?

This is a pretty muddy species.
B. vagans and B. albopilosum are both "hobby" tarantulas unless you have an import. Nothing wrong with breeding them, just understand that they're not the true species. Same goes for B. boehmei.
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

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What about Brachypelma vagans? Should these be avoided when it comes to breeding?

This is a pretty muddy species.
I wouldn't bother with vagans, I would wait until new bloodline babies from Mexico are imported, grow the babies up and keep purchasing new bloodlines out of Mexico.
 

Jeff23

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I have been wondering about Avicularia amazonica which is now in limbo. It is possibly a variation of a different species or a mix of a couple different species. It was never mentioned in the study that presented new changes to the best of my knowledge. It just fell off the list. I personally still love it regardless of scientific findings.

EDIT* I have a couple of them but they are just slings.
 

Haksilence

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I'd say the Nicaraguan B. albopilosum. Between @Exoskeleton Invertebrates and @Blue Jaye, there are 8 gravid females that we know of. The market is going to be flooded with those very soon. I wouldn't pair that species just for the sake of trying to get rid of them.
I have a gravid female as well from Nicaraguan stock, as well I think Jiacovazzi has a few when he dot a shipment
 

boina

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There are quite a few species I wouldn't breed because the market (in Europe) is so saturated. B. vagans, of course and about all the Lasiodoras (LP, LK, LD, LS, although LD may be a bit different), but also Nhandu. There was just one sac of Nhandu carapoensis in Germany about two years ago, but it produced 1200 Spiderlings and by now everyone who ever wanted a N. carapoensis has one or five and there are still quite a few left over. P. cancerides is another one I wouldn't breed in Europe at the moment. In America there may be other species, too.
 

cold blood

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Pretty much every pet store Avicularia.
There's always a market for ANY avic spp. I produced 3 sacs of A. avic last summer and was sold out of them in just a couple months.

I also disagree on the Nhandu...people of all experience levels love Nhandu, and because they are cheap and look great, they also sell quick.

I wouldn't breed OBT, LP, vagans, H. mac or porteri. Getting rid of them will be a task, and hundreds of porteri could be a pain (same for tiny vagans)....and OBT and LP will all be in adult housing before you get rid of half the sac unless you are willing to wholesale them for pennies on the dollar...you better have lots of housing and room for the fast growing ones, and massive time and patience for the slow growers, or an avenue to give away a lot of them.

Basically all of these species regularly, if not constantly, see their markets flooded to the point of worthlessness.
 

Arachnomaniac19

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There's always a market for ANY avic spp. I produced 3 sacs of A. avic last summer and was sold out of them in just a couple months.

I also disagree on the Nhandu...people of all experience levels love Nhandu, and because they are cheap and look great, they also sell quick.

I wouldn't breed OBT, LP, vagans, H. mac or porteri. Getting rid of them will be a task, and hundreds of porteri could be a pain (same for tiny vagans)....and OBT and LP will all be in adult housing before you get rid of half the sac unless you are willing to wholesale them for pennies on the dollar...you better have lots of housing and room for the fast growing ones, and massive time and patience for the slow growers, or an avenue to give away a lot of them.

Basically all of these species regularly, if not constantly, see their markets flooded to the point of worthlessness.
I never said there wasn't a market. All I said is that they shouldn't be bred. This is due to the risk of hybridization that comes with species that are not and/or cannot be properly identified.
 

viper69

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So I got a few adult females I am ready to knock up. I am aware some of these tarantulas may be muddled up when it comes to genetics, name changes, and too many hybrids existing.

So I am asking what tarantulas should be put on hold when it comes to breeding?
A few examples from the Brachypelma comes to mind.
Without knowing what females you have, can't provide you info. This is an excellent case where putting one's collection on their profile is USEFUL.
 

viper69

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I have been wondering about Avicularia amazonica which is now in limbo. It is possibly a variation of a different species or a mix of a couple different species. It was never mentioned in the study that presented new changes to the best of my knowledge. It just fell off the list. I personally still love it regardless of scientific findings.

EDIT* I have a couple of them but they are just slings.

It's sp. amazonica Jeff, it has not been characterized yet in publication, unless that revision is out. Is it??? If not, it's only a locality, a beautiful one too, and quite large for Avics.
 

gypsy cola

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Without knowing what females you have, can't provide you info. This is an excellent case where putting one's collection on their profile is USEFUL.
I asked the question to start a conversation. I know that some species are muddled, heavily bred, taxonomy issues, etc. B. vagans is the only one that I own I actually cared about because they are known to be hybrids. I figured if one spider is sketchy, how many other ones are out there etc. The question I asked was in general, not out of what I care for.
 

viper69

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I asked the question to start a conversation. I know that some species are muddled, heavily bred, taxonomy issues, etc. B. vagans is the only one that I own I actually cared about because they are known to be hybrids. I figured if one spider is sketchy, how many other ones are out there etc. The question I asked was in general, not out of what I care for.
Understood, it was your leading sentence that caused my reply >>> "So I got a few adult females I am ready to knock up"

If you had removed the above quoted material some readers will see it as a general question.;)
 

EulersK

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Without knowing what females you have, can't provide you info. This is an excellent case where putting one's collection on their profile is USEFUL.
Get my name out of your head, because my species list is 100% up to date after you and CB made me cry :alien
 

gypsy cola

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Understood, it was your leading sentence that caused my reply >>> "So I got a few adult females I am ready to knock up"

If you had removed the above quoted material some readers will see it as a general question.;)
It was more of story to why the question was asked. I can see what you mean though, it is unnecessary in hindsight.
 
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