Amblypygid ID?

_scorpio_

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2008
Messages
44
Anyone have any idea what this might be? Having a great deal of trouble finding anything other than D. diadema in the UK.
Also anyone know what the largest species of Amblypygi is?
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_scorpio_

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2008
Messages
44
Thanks, been googling for hours and didnt even find Heterophrynus mentioned!
Im guessing the largest ones are likely to be in the Heterophrynus family then?
 

wizentrop

to the rescue!
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
522
That is NOT H. armiger.
This can be one of several other species of Heterophrynus. Hard to tell which one exactly, since this specimen is not an adult, and only a single photo is provided. It reminds me of H. gorgo, but I reiterate that it is impossible to ID without inspecting the specimen. Locality information is important too.
 

symbol

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Messages
41
As for the largest amblypygid... depends on your definition. I believe H. batesii has the longest whipspan (~60cm), but A. coronatus is the most massive/heaviest. Both are really lovely, impressive creatures, but I have a particular fondness for H. alces myself. Not as large as some others, but I just love the look of their "catch basket".
 

schmiggle

Arachnoking
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Messages
2,188
Thank you, Wizentrop, for clarifying. If it helps, the original posting does have another photo, but no close-up shots of the pedipalps (often how species are differentiated, yes?).

Out of curiosity, how do you tell by looking at the photo? I was going mostly off of vague resemblance (especially colors--H. armiger is the only one I've seen pictures of with the same color patterns). I will not repeat that mistake again :p But what, precisely, are you using?
 

wizentrop

to the rescue!
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
522
I usually rely on taxonomical keys and species descriptions, but in this case I am using my field experience. H. armiger is more robust with shorter pedipalps.
You can see a couple of photos of H. armiger (along with some examples of other Amblypygi) on my website - http://gilwizen.com/photography/amblypygi/
Completely by coincidence, my latest publication reports H. armiger feeding on frogs, if you're interested - https://www.researchgate.net/public...antis_achatinus_Cachabi_Robber_Frog_Predation
 

Ghoul

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 16, 2016
Messages
134
I usually rely on taxonomical keys and species descriptions, but in this case I am using my field experience. H. armiger is more robust with shorter pedipalps.
You can see a couple of photos of H. armiger (along with some examples of other Amblypygi) on my website - http://gilwizen.com/photography/amblypygi/
Completely by coincidence, my latest publication reports H. armiger feeding on frogs, if you're interested - https://www.researchgate.net/public...antis_achatinus_Cachabi_Robber_Frog_Predation
Wow, you took all these pictures? They are beautiful! ;o;
 
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