Amblypigi Id and help

Erica Clemente

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 13, 2020
Messages
25
Good morning to all. There is really so little sources of information on these that is not either so scientific I need to look up every other word or seems dreadfully insufficient. I got one at Petco the other day. In a 10 gallon on its side with a door and ventilation. vertical and diagonally placed cork and plants to the top and a foam background (that I tossed to the side with my T’s finally used!) a few inches of damp substrate.

So for care… water dish? Gauging cricket size ? ID? Any feed back would be appreciated
 

Attachments

ThemantismanofPA

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
150
some damon sp, most likely medius. generally no water dish is needed, and it looks like its close to adulthood, so large crickets are fine. Humid, but not too humid. I keep springtail with mine because theyre super messy eaters and high humidity causes mold. Dont worry, mold isnt likely to kill them
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
747
^^^ What they said. Setup looks appropriate, though all that extra decor up top might just end up giving prey a place to hide. Should be fine though. Keep that substrate moist and you should be good. Amblypygi will take pretty big prey so anything bigger than a baby Damon can handle large crickets easily.

This animal is very likely wild caught, so assume it's super stressed and needs extra moisture and plenty of quiet time.
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
462
some damon sp, most likely medius. generally no water dish is needed, and it looks like its close to adulthood, so large crickets are fine. Humid, but not too humid. I keep springtail with mine because theyre super messy eaters and high humidity causes mold. Dont worry, mold isnt likely to kill them
Some species of amblypygi even have symbiotic relationships with mold on their exoskeletons. Unfortunately the study proving this is behind a paywall now :/
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
747
Some species of amblypygi even have symbiotic relationships with mold on their exoskeletons. Unfortunately the study proving this is behind a paywall now :/
DO you happen to have the title, the author list, or any other info that might help track this down? My university may have access to the journal.
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
462

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
747
Thank you! Turns out I do in fact have access!

Looks like fungal growth is widespread - they found a variety of fungal species growing on all of the amblypygi they examined. There appeared to be zero evidence of any of the fungi being able to cause infections in the amblypygi, even in the cases of fungal species that are known to be lethal to spiders and various insects. The fungal hyphae also didn't penetrate the exoskeleton in any of the specimens they examined, which is one of the major indicators of a parasitic or entomopathic fungus. They hypothesize that the fungus may actually play a protective role - a lot of the fungus species they found produce antimicrobial secretions.
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
590
:)
also very interesting in this regard are these two papers:


two more papers dealing with this cerotogument aspects will follow soon.
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
590
The next paper dealing with this special feature in neglected arachnid orders will be soon published:

Seiter, M., Schwaha, T., Ferreira, R.L., Prendini, L., Wolff, J.O. 2021. Fine structure of the epicuticular secretion coat and associated glands of Pedipalpi and Palpigradi (Arachnida). Journal of Morphology. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmor.21360
 
Top