African longtail centipede

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
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Joined
Sep 12, 2002
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2,280
I picked up a couple of these guys labeled as Rhysida longipes/ African longtail centipede and did a search without finding much in the way of personal experiences. Anybody breeding these or keeping them communally with anything interesting to report? Any pics of one over 3" (without legs or antennae)?
 

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Xenomorph

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Joined
Sep 19, 2010
Messages
88
Hello,

I have a few of these species.
My personal experience with this type is the following: Leading the way in a very hidden life, and when they come out of their time hiding out or I have to implement them, they are neither extremely nervous or very aggressive. But who needs them run their terminal legs they swing back and forth, up and down that they want to eat, they can distract the enemies in the legs drop easy.

Attitude of them: 20-22C ° and 70-80% humidity

Breeding for I can tell you nothing more accurate. Had only clutches a sham.
I think all individually. From a consumer group I know nothing of this sort, but they are widely used across the world.

I have only one which both terminal legs are missing, or otherwise change the behavior I have not noticed.

Hope you could help a little further. despite my bad english

cheer
Sandro





 

dannyboypede

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Joined
Aug 22, 2010
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142
Doesn't Ken have some of those? I hope to get some from him eventually. I had this great idea. Here it goes: Get your hands on two of those double betta tanks. Or you could get 4 display cubes. In Giant Centipedes, The Enthusiast's Handbook it speaks about the Barrier Method of breeding (legs, antennae, and genitals can interact, but the pedes can't get to each other). Put very small holes in the walls of the enclosures. Make sure all of the holes in all of the walls in all of the enclosures match up. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT! Then take the tanks/cubes and arrange them side by side in a square configuration. This way you have enclosure 1 is in contact with enclosures 2 and 3. Enclosure 2 is in contact with enclosures 1 and 4, enclosure 3 is in contact with enclosures 1 and 4, and enclosure 4 is in contact with enclosures 2 and 3. It is kind of confusing, but that is the best way I can think to describe it :?. With this square configuration and each enclosure side to side with two other enclosures, your chances of getting a male and female to come into contact with each other is greatly increased. Mind you, this is assuming that the barrier method works. This is simply an idea, and I have yet to test it. Don't go writing books and claiming this is your idea; Copyright dannyboypede 2010 {D. Barrier method: not my idea. What to use as barriers: my idea{D. Also, if they are communal or semi-communal, you could just put them together and see what they do.

--Dan;)
 

Xenomorph

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Sep 19, 2010
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This is a very good idea who I even have time dan I will to try your method;)

cheer

Sandro
 

treygoba

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 13, 2008
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3
Used this method...

a decade ago with my S. gigantea. 3 clutches in 3 years...all eaten prior to hatching.
 

dannyboypede

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Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
142
a decade ago with my S. gigantea. 3 clutches in 3 years...all eaten prior to hatching.
I doubt the two are connected, but it is possible. If you use the display cubes, then you can separate them when a pede gets a clutch to prevent disturbances. It is a real shame that they ate the clutches. At least we know the method works to a certain degree, i.e. the genitals can do their thing;). Where exactly did you put the holes in your barriers?

--Dan
 
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