Advice on a really tiny centipede

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
83
Hello all, I live in North Carolina, and about a month ago I found a tiny centipede under a brick, and managed to catch it by tricking it onto a leaf. Its is about the size of a dime lengthwise, maybe the tiniest bit longer, and slightly thicker than an uncooked spaghetti strand.

Due to its size, I haven't been able to really feed it anything. I have crushed a few pill bugs and left them in with him as food, and I've noticed nothing left but their shells, but they may have decomposed. I've also noticed gnat larva, but never of notable size, leading me to think he is eating them, and probably not the pill bug.

Any advice? Think it might get larger? I would take a picture, but he is too small to get in focus, and really hard to find at all in his tiny container (adept hider). Best match I could find by looking at a NC critter guide was bark scorpion, but it seems too small.
 

jhjhj

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 17, 2021
Messages
16
Based on the size description and the described appearance to a small bark centipede, could be a stone centipede. (Lithobius)
 

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
83
Based on the size description and the described appearance to a small bark centipede, could be a stone centipede. (Lithobius)
looks pretty similar, though this one is a bit leaner. It hasn't grown since I got it, about 2 months now. But it eats.
 

TheHouseof21pairs

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
102
Most likely a Lithobiomorpha, without picture the sp. is hard to know. The most common lithobius is the fortificatus sp., but as I said with no pic it’s hard to say
 

TheHouseof21pairs

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
102
The video clears up any doubt. It’s not a Lithobiomorpha, that is a Cryptop or Cryptopidae belonging to the order of Scolopendromorph centipedes. There’s over 150 different species known in the word so very very difficult to guess it. They don’t grow any bigger then 2/3 inches.
 

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
83
The video clears up any doubt. It’s not a Lithobiomorpha, that is a Cryptop or Cryptopidae belonging to the order of Scolopendromorph centipedes. There’s over 150 different species known in the word so very very difficult to guess it. They don’t grow any bigger then 2/3 inches.
Thanks for telling me! Guess it is full grown then. I kept him because I am new to centipedes, figured it would be a good starter pet. May try a bigger one some day
 
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