Advice for school lab pet/s

asher

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 19, 2010
Messages
56
Hey, I was wondering if you guys had any advice on a pet for a school lab. It would have to be something safe so it passes health and safety regulations (i.e. not a tarantula or dangerous spider). Cost isn't really an issue, although of course it can't be an extortionate price.

I was thinking stick insects or mantids would be an easy option, although I'm not sure. How dangerous are the big assassin bugs? Also, are there any spiders which spin impressive webs (i.e. Argiope sp.) available to purchase and not dangerous at all?

Thanks!
 

ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
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Mar 8, 2008
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Cockroaches. Madagascar hissers are okay for handling, Archimandrita tesselata are better. There are also B. discoidalis, B. dubia, and various other species that are good for observing.
 

neubii18

Arachnosquire
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Dec 14, 2009
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tarantulas are not deadly.and only some have bad venom.if you got a Brachypelma Smithi,you wouldn't have any problems other than the hairs.if you wanted one that webbed,get an avicularia versicolor.
 

redrumpslump

Arachnobaron
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My 10th grade science teacher had some red belly fire toads and they were really cool. Also maybe some hamsters or fish.

Matt
 

GPulchra

Arachnoknight
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Jul 21, 2010
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I remember when my class had a hamster. BEST pet! We took turns taking it home over the weekend, fed it Yogies.
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
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Mudskippers. Big ole googly frog eyes, fish body, jump around, come flopping over at any hint that there is food involved :D
 

asher

Arachnosquire
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Aug 19, 2010
Messages
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tarantulas are not deadly.and only some have bad venom.if you got a Brachypelma Smithi,you wouldn't have any problems other than the hairs.if you wanted one that webbed,get an avicularia versicolor.
I have no issue with tarantulas, it's just I doubt anything that can bite or that could trigger an allergic reaction will make it past health and safety.


Mudskippers. Big ole googly frog eyes, fish body, jump around, come flopping over at any hint that there is food involved :D
I hadn't considered these, do they require particularly expensive equipment? What sort of prices would the mudskippers themselves be?


Isopods, earthworms, ants.
The only isopods I could find were small ones, are larger ones available to buy?


Cockroaches. Madagascar hissers are okay for handling, Archimandrita tesselata are better. There are also B. discoidalis, B. dubia, and various other species that are good for observing.
Cockroaches seem a good idea, I'll look into them!
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
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I paid about $9 USD for mine, although I think they would be cheaper where you are. Right now my 3 Indian (I recommend these. Smaller, can be kept in easier, more peaceful. Other types get much larger, are more aggressive, and are better off alone.) are in a 10gal with about 4 to 5" of sand, a small mat heater under half the tank, and a "pool" of water (they are rackish and require salty water.)

I'm going to upgrade the soon to a 55gal just for the fun of it. Am going to use a mud combination, mangrove plants, some driftwood, more skippers, and maybe some crabs.
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Gromphadorhina portentosa are always a hit. I am always asked about phasmids(stick bugs), but non-natives are a no-no here. Maybe better in your area? Either would be relatively inexpensive
 

asher

Arachnosquire
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Aug 19, 2010
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What about tailless whipscorpions? They look exciting... Is there a possibility of them hurting someone if handled/are they expensive or difficult to keep?
 

dtknow

Arachnoking
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Tailess whips are harmless but I do not think they will make good classroom pets. They need to be left relatively alone which is not going to happen in a classroom. If the kids do not bang on the glass and they are not handled frequently(I personally believe these should not be handled at all...they do best left strictly alone) they could be a fascinating display.

I would highly reccomend newts/salamanders. Axolotls would be a good possibility, if not any smaller newt species will fit the bill. Inexpensive upkeep, harmless, cute, and interesting.
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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That would be a good choice, too. No defenses to worry about with the kids, although they are fragile if you intend to have young children handling them.
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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If this is for very small children and there is any possibility of ingestion, be careful of which species you get. Many are quite toxic.

Axolotls would be a fine choice, dr! They get up to 13" inside of a couple years, are quite curious, take to a number of available foods(& have their own "chow"). Once the tank is seasoned, maintainance is low.
 

Vespula

Arachnodemon
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Mantids are good insects, but personally, I'd go with a large arigope spider. When I was little, I kept one as a pet, and it inspired me to go into science, entomology and Arachnology. They can be great for a kid!
 

groovyspider

Arachnoknight
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Aug 18, 2010
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maybe a huge toad not one that has venom glands.. maybe a pacman frog i dont think they have venom do they:?? they get a good size are warm colored and wont bite or sting ( i dont no much about frogs more of an invert guy but just putting my 2 cents in)
 

asher

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 19, 2010
Messages
56
Mantids are good insects, but personally, I'd go with a large arigope spider. When I was little, I kept one as a pet, and it inspired me to go into science, entomology and Arachnology. They can be great for a kid!
A nice web-spinning spider sounds good, which species would you recommend?
 

dtknow

Arachnoking
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Being in London you may be able to acquire one of the large Nephila species. If you have enough room(a window sized frame enclosure) they build massive webs.

Anything local would be just as suitable, however. It would be interesting to try to put them on a reverse photoperiod to see if they can be observed constructing a web...that is sure to fascinate.
 

kevin91172

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Oct 11, 2009
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407
Giant millipedes!!!
Yes! I took a alligator snapper and a red ear slider in a bowl together,

Me and my science teacher got along great.I had some snakes to bring,which she liked but she did not want to push it. she was a new young teacher and loved her job
 
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