Advice for first time Pokie owner

TarantuLover81

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Apr 21, 2016
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i just ordered my first two Pokies. I am getting a P. Regalis and a P. Ornata. Both are about 1-1.5" slings right now. Any advice. I have 14 new World species some docile some really skittish...but most of them run away and hide..however, as I understand it..the OW T's are more prone to stand and fight, bite first..ask questions later sort of attitude. What advice can you guys give me?

Thanks!

PS. I'm so glad to be a member of this board! I've learned SO much from you guys!!!
 

TarantuLover81

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Whoops...I meant P. regalis and P. ornata..I didn't notice it was doing auto-cap when I hit the . button!!
 

Venom1080

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super fast, skittish, and ornata gets pretty defensive as it grows.. keep the catch cups ready. beware the venom, seriously, dont take risks..
theyre quite tolerant to dryer conditions, but ive always kept them slightly moist.
 

TarantuLover81

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Thank you very much! I know these species are in a totally different ball park than NW species so any info, advice, or short cuts (if there are any) are VERY much appreciated!!
 

TarantuLover81

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Are there any differences in how I should handle the slings vs adults..or are they that way from 1.5" slings?
 

Ghost56

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From my experience, poecs would much rather bolt than give a threat posture. As venom1080 said, they're quick though, so be ready for that.
 

TarantuLover81

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Are they a great deal faster than GBB's? I've gotten used to their speed and skittishness...is there any comparison?
 

cold blood

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adults are 10x worse. slings are nothing compared to their adult counterparts.
Adults are the real deal, not to be taken lightly...respect!

That said, while their potential is 10X, an adult is actually rarely defensive, and they tend to either flee to a hide (and not a frantic bolt, just a brisk walk) or just rely on their camo and just hold their ground....usually its the latter for mine (except striata). I haven't found ornata to be any more defensive than any of my other poecs at all.

ornata
Regalis

 
Last edited:

DrowsyLids

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Dec 4, 2016
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Congrats and good luck! My first poec was a regalis a few years ago and I fell in love with the entire genus. I moisten the sub and let it dry in between watering and sometimes allow a little bit of a dry spell. but the sub is moist more often than not w/ always full water dish. Their speed and venom potency shouldn't be taken lightly, but like others stated they are more likely to retreat to their hide than give you a threat pose. As slings they might burrow and be unseen for long periods of time IME but you can expect that from many species.
 

bryverine

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Apr 18, 2012
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Are they a great deal faster than GBB's? I've gotten used to their speed and skittishness...is there any comparison?
Yes and no. My regalis does seem faster maybe, but it's the erratic movements that make 'em more difficult IME.

I've rarely gotten a threat posture from my regalis. She runs and... well dances around the enclosure until she makes it back into her hole in the ground.
 

viper69

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Are they a great deal faster than GBB's? I've gotten used to their speed and skittishness...is there any comparison?
GBBs are slow compared to that genus. A breeder and friend of mine owned a female P metallica, and they are small, it went up one arm, across his shoulders and down his other arm before he had time to react. He's an experienced breeder of both Ts and venomous reptiles too, many decades of experience.

All tarantulas are deceptive in their movement. I was looking at my G. iheringi, not a slow NW species, taking gentle steps. You might think it's slow, and as you know, they aren't.

Poki's are wired for speed, they are built for that and agility.

Slings are equally as fast, ie they aren't slow. My P rufilatas were always very fast, and that was when they were only 2" and less.

When in doubt, take a time out w/this genus.

W/all that, this genus is more likely to go down and retreat than rise up like some OW African species.

I would provide your Poki's with a decent amount of coverage so they feel secure and a container that provides you with more than enough space to work with them.

Also, a good vertical cork bark tube will be very similar to what they live in out in the wild. I would submerge it into the sub a bit, but allow them to burrow out the back if they want. As you many Ts usually like more than 1 escape route from the hide.
 

Spidermolt

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May 29, 2015
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Its a whole new ball park your walking into. They're not hard to take care of especially if you've own a few fast NW arboreals in the past which will help prepare you but the key things to always remember is respect, patience, and preparedness.

RESPECT:
-This is a very fast genus which can and will flee when disturbed but if it feels like it can't get away then it will not hesitate to throw a threat pose and strike.
-I've never been bitten but I have done extensive research to understand that their venom potency which ranges from a hell of an agonizing night to a trip to the hospital not counting the several weeks of on and off pain.
-They are a generally larger genus so they will need proper sized cages with no (IMO) excuse of "it could be placed in this space saving enclosure". The ranges will vary of course from Sp. to Sp. such as MM male regalis and metallica easily in 8"x8"x12" cages whereas a MM ornata and rufilata needs 12"x12"x18". ALL females of EVERY Poecilotheria sp. I own goes into a 12"x12"x18".

PATIENCE:
- Do not rush this genus because of already said info.
- IF you try and rush things then it increases the chances of you forgetting a step which can result in the harm or you or your T.

PREPAREDNESS:
- Nothing is more stressful than having a T run out and then saying $#!t What now, trust me.
- When dealing with OWs then you should always place the cage in an area where you know the T cannot run far and/or hide.
-Always have several capture cups of varying sizes, paint brushes, flashlights, and tongs near by when doing any care/maintenance.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Just attention always and nothing bad should happen. They are super fast and their venom is brutal, you know this of course, but they mostly prefer to run & hide instead of "stomping" the foot like a Sumo fighter and fight like certain baboons love to do :kiss:
 

TarantuLover81

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Apr 21, 2016
Messages
54
Adults are the real deal, not to be taken lightly...respect!

That said, while their potential is 10X, an adult is actually rarely defensive, and they tend to either flee to a hide (and not a frantic bolt, just a brisk walk) or just rely on their camo and just hold their ground....usually its the latter for mine (except striata). I haven't found ornata to be any more defensive than any of my other poecs at all.
Regalis

Wow you have a beautiful specimen! Thank you for your advice!
 

TarantuLover81

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
54
Its a whole new ball park your walking into. They're not hard to take care of especially if you've own a few fast NW arboreals in the past which will help prepare you but the key things to always remember is respect, patience, and preparedness.

RESPECT:
-This is a very fast genus which can and will flee when disturbed but if it feels like it can't get away then it will not hesitate to throw a threat pose and strike.
-I've never been bitten but I have done extensive research to understand that their venom potency which ranges from a hell of an agonizing night to a trip to the hospital not counting the several weeks of on and off pain.
-They are a generally larger genus so they will need proper sized cages with no (IMO) excuse of "it could be placed in this space saving enclosure". The ranges will vary of course from Sp. to Sp. such as MM male regalis and metallica easily in 8"x8"x12" cages whereas a MM ornata and rufilata needs 12"x12"x18". ALL females of EVERY Poecilotheria sp. I own goes into a 12"x12"x18".

PATIENCE:
- Do not rush this genus because of already said info.
- IF you try and rush things then it increases the chances of you forgetting a step which can result in the harm or you or your T.

PREPAREDNESS:
- Nothing is more stressful than having a T run out and then saying $#!t What now, trust me.
- When dealing with OWs then you should always place the cage in an area where you know the T cannot run far and/or hide.
-Always have several capture cups of varying sizes, paint brushes, flashlights, and tongs near by when doing any care/maintenance.
Thank you so much for such a detailed "plan" of sorts!! Very detailed and well thought out. Thank you!!
 

TarantuLover81

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
54
GBBs are slow compared to that genus. A breeder and friend of mine owned a female P metallica, and they are small, it went up one arm, across his shoulders and down his other arm before he had time to react. He's an experienced breeder of both Ts and venomous reptiles too, many decades of experience.

All tarantulas are deceptive in their movement. I was looking at my G. iheringi, not a slow NW species, taking gentle steps. You might think it's slow, and as you know, they aren't.

Poki's are wired for speed, they are built for that and agility.

Slings are equally as fast, ie they aren't slow. My P rufilatas were always very fast, and that was when they were only 2" and less.

When in doubt, take a time out w/this genus.

W/all that, this genus is more likely to go down and retreat than rise up like some OW African species.

I would provide your Poki's with a decent amount of coverage so they feel secure and a container that provides you with more than enough space to work with them.

Also, a good vertical cork bark tube will be very similar to what they live in out in the wild. I would submerge it into the sub a bit, but allow them to burrow out the back if they want. As you many Ts usually like more than 1 escape route from the hide.
Thank you for sharing your experience!! You guys are really helping me to prepare mentally for this new side of this awesome hobby that is so misunderstood and stereotyped...I love talking to people who love them like I do.
 
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