Acanthoscurria Geniculata hair?

Ehliza

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 29, 2016
Messages
29
Sometime this week I'll be ordering my first T, an A geni. I've heard they are big hair flickers. For those with experience, how often is this? I know it varies with each individual but in your experience. Also, how bad are these hairs? Are they so bad that if I reached into the enclosure to pick something up ( which I'd probably avoid while the T was still in there ) is my hand gonna get bombarded by loose hairs and suffer relentless rash/itching for days? Maybe im just paranoid but if those hairs are really as bad as they say, I'd prefer KNOT to TANGLE with those ;)
 

BobBarley

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Sep 16, 2015
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1,480
Also, how bad are these hairs?
This also varies between people. Some people barely react, some people react with huge blisters. For example, I only keep NW (including Theraphosa stirmi, which probably has the worst u hairs in the hobby along with the rest of its genus) and I barely react to hairs. I've been told however, that, with repeated exposure, my reaction will get worse. My advice is to not stick your face too close to the enclosure, and you'll most likely be ok.

I don't keep Acanthoscurria geniculata, so I can't give any insight on my reaction to that particular species.
 

chanda

Arachnoking
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Jun 27, 2010
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I have an A. geniculata and she's one of my favorites. I've never seen her flick hairs, but she is a beast at feeding time! (My GBB's are my worst hair flickers.)

The trick to cage maintenance is just to not stick your hands in there at all if you can help it - particularly if the spider is in there. If you don't already have some, invest in a nice long pair of feeding tongs (with rubber-coated tips, to avoid fang damage if she decides to cop an attitude and attack the tongs). Tongs can be used to remove dead crickets, molts, and other debris. For heavier-duty maintenance like removing/cleaning a water dish or hide or changing substrate, wear disposable gloves to protect your hands from stray hairs in the enclosure - and only reach in after the spider is safely covered in a catch-cup or has been removed from the enclosure.
 

Ehliza

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Nov 29, 2016
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29
I have an A. geniculata and she's one of my favorites. I've never seen her flick hairs, but she is a beast at feeding time! (My GBB's are my worst hair flickers.)

The trick to cage maintenance is just to not stick your hands in there at all if you can help it - particularly if the spider is in there. If you don't already have some, invest in a nice long pair of feeding tongs (with rubber-coated tips, to avoid fang damage if she decides to cop an attitude and attack the tongs). Tongs can be used to remove dead crickets, molts, and other debris. For heavier-duty maintenance like removing/cleaning a water dish or hide or changing substrate, wear disposable gloves to protect your hands from stray hairs in the enclosure - and only reach in after the spider is safely covered in a catch-cup or has been removed from the enclosure.
Thanks for the advice:)!
 

Haksilence

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Dec 6, 2015
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405
It's 100% dependant on the individual for this species, more so than others I'd say.
A geniculata seem to have some of the most personality in tarantulas, and likewise I have some that have never flicked, never given a threat posture, and are chill as a cucumber to disturbance. And on the other hand I have ones (from the same sack as the chill one's mind you) that flick worse than my boehmeis and are PMSing 24/7

Noone can tell you if YOUR geniculata will be nasty or not, just get to wait and see :D but fear not, in my experience their hairs seem quite mild compared to Brachypelma albo/boehmei and they are a true joy to own, one of my ABSOLUTE favorites
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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This is one of the few NW Ts that chronically is cited has having "terrible setae". SO when I read that and hear it from my friends who own this species 2 things pop up in my mind, 1. This species flicks more than most 2. Its setae are worse than most.
 

Formerphobe

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Feb 27, 2011
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2,342
The flickiness is as individual as the keeper's reaction to the hairs.
My A geniculata has never been a flicker. But, she does leave random hairs about her enclosure because she's a NW tarantula.
I ditto the recommendation to invest in a set of tongs. I never reach my hand onto any of my spider enclosures.
 

mistertim

Arachnobaron
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
551
Yeah just keep your hands out and you'll be ok. That being said, as others have stated, it really varies from one to the next. My A. genic has never once flicked hairs since I got her about 6 months ago. However, I know people who have said theirs flicks at the slightest disturbance. A. geniculata seems to be one of the more unpredictable species as far as their overall temperament. The only thing that tends to be consistent with them is that they eat like ravenous pigs.
 

bryverine

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Apr 18, 2012
Messages
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Make sure not to get too excited with molts (no fingers) and use tongs for maintenance. I made this mistake with my LP once and starting digging around... bad choice on my part.

You'll find that webbing in the enclosure has hairs embedded in it so it's not just the hair cloud to be weary of.

If you stay hands off, you'll probably be fine. :)
 

The Grym Reaper

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I've found that they're quite itchy but not as irritating as Lasiodora hairs. Mine doesn't flick that often tbh.
 

Kayis

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 26, 2016
Messages
37
Anything that kicks hair gets lab treatment which means I'm tossing on anything to protect my eyes, long sleeve clothing, gloves and most importantly tongs. I have sensitive skin....:banghead:
 
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