Aborial Brachypelma Vagans???

Divan1985

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
3
Hi there all.

I have a Brachypelma Vagans. She is about 4cm in length. She does not burrow at all but prefers to be in the air on the side of the cage..(I'm sure she is an aborial wannabe)..lol..:?

She also hardly eats but she is in good shape and not starving. What should I do about this and should I be concerned about this?

Kind Regards

Divan Schoeman
:confused:
 

popcangenie

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 6, 2010
Messages
135
well i would say she is not trying to be a climber but you probually keeping her en closer setup wrong

how wet is her en closer?? they will climb it it is to wet or they just don't like it

and is it reused coco fiber because ive heard of the hair annoying them causing them to stay off the ground
 

Divan1985

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
3
I have a hide in and a small bowl of water. It is peat moss that I use and I moist it a little every now and then, but not that often. She has burrowed before but she all of a sudden stoped burrowing.
 

TerribleGrizz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
15
If it's new substrate your T may not have adjusted to it yet. I know my T stayed on the wall or partially on the wall when I rehoused it. Eventually it got away from the wall and now wanders freely.:D
 

Divan1985

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
3
I had cleaned the cage and put in new substrate today because of her not burrowing. This has been going on for atleast 2 months if not more. This had happend when I last put in new substrate.
 

TerribleGrizz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
15
It's probably just the fact that it is new substrate then. Give it time and it should get away from the wall.

Don't worry about it not burrowing. Brachys aren't obligate burrowers. If it wants to burrow it will. :)
 

Arachnos482

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
50
I have B. vagans. and she also took a while to adjust to the new substrate when i changed her substrate, she usually spends most of her time in the open, she made a burrow, but only uses it when i open the enclosure. Just give her time.
 

JimM

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
Messages
873
Adjusting to substrate/enclosure aside...a tarantula climbing the side of the cage does not equate to arboreal behavior.

It always gets me how whenever someones tarantula dares leave the bottom of the cage, it somehow has turned into a tree spider.
 

sharpfang

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Messages
913
Lol - It's a Plastic Container Climbing T

It always gets me how whenever someones tarantula dares leave the bottom of the cage, it somehow has turned into a tree spider.
I hear what you are saying....:cool:

Sometimes Hobbyists will work w/ a species, that behaves different then usual though.

I had C.Rican Tiger-Rumps, that basically lived on Bio-Vines w/ fake Leaves wrapped around :eek: My Buddies collection of them ONLY ever seen on ground & in burrow.

Mine would climb & perch alot....and All mating interactions were high-up in container branches/ledges :? She eventually came down, and Burrowed deep into Soil - to lay sack.....after process done {eaten after disturbed :(} she began to "Roost" again :rolleyes:

B. Vagans are considered a Burrower, IMO - and I have seen 1ft. long tunnels from them, to the Bottom. 4 whatever that's worth.

- Jason
 

Bill S

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
1,420
Adjusting to substrate/enclosure aside...a tarantula climbing the side of the cage does not equate to arboreal behavior.

It always gets me how whenever someones tarantula dares leave the bottom of the cage, it somehow has turned into a tree spider.
+1 I guess the concept works if you view the world in the context of a kritter keeper - but in the real world it's not unusual for purely terrestrial animals to be found several feet above the surface of the ground. Arborial means they climb trees - which is a lot different than the walls of a small plastic cage.

The example I'll use for a terrestrial climbing small distances in the wild is Aphonopelma chalcodes. They're common where I live, and during the warm months of the year we often see them hunting on window ledges on the outside of our house at night, picking off moths and other insects that are drawn to the light. They're still terrestrial - but the "ground" is not just a low flat surface - it includes rocks, walls, ledges, etc.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
The only reason to change out the substrate is if you have some sort of infestation that you cannot remedy IMO. When you change it out, you are taking everything that marks the enclosure as home out and forcing it to get settled in again, which takes time. Don't do it, unless you have to.
 
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