A. Versicolor enclosure idea

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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You can block off part of the ventilation with clear packing tape from the inside(sticky side facing outside), the TKG recommends saran wrap also. A big water dish and partially blocking off that ventilation and you should be good to go.

Edited to add:

That is a nifty looking enclosure!
 

Alice

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I don't think you even need to block any of those holes - avics ime do best with very good ventilation. They also don't need a high humidity per se - as the exoscelleton is impenetrable to humidity.

I've never had an Avic die on me (and I've had plenty and even bred them) and I kept them with loads of ventilation and never a concern for humidity. What they really need is plenty to drink so they don't dehydrate - so mist every day and you will fare better with loads of ventilation than with too little of it (because then they tend to die from fungus spores).
 

curiousme

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I don't think you even need to block any of those holes - avics ime do best with very good ventilation. They also don't need a high humidity per se - as the exoscelleton is impenetrable to humidity.

I've never had an Avic die on me (and I've had plenty and even bred them) and I kept them with loads of ventilation and never a concern for humidity. What they really need is plenty to drink so they don't dehydrate - so mist every day and you will fare better with loads of ventilation than with too little of it (because then they tend to die from fungus spores).
While I agree they don't have high humidity requirements, the misting is simply busywork and not needed, or accomplishing anything; unless you want the T to drink from the walls.

Here is a thread where Stan Schultz states that Ts aren't really known to die from fungal infections.

and here is one where he states that misting is unnecessary


OP ~ If you want higher humidity, it can be accomplished, but this species is not one that calls for high humidity. We kept ours with a higher humidity, so that is why I answered the way I did. :) Just make sure it always has water available, whichever care you choose to give your T.
 

Jimi Thing

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Alright, thanks for the help. Do you think this might be a little large for an adult versicolor?
 

Dexity

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i have a versicolor and my enclosure is bigger than that, and she is happy. I can say though give it plenty to walk around on, exploration and things to webb off of. I dont have the most experience and I recently just got the tank set where I am satisfied!
 

curiousme

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Alright, thanks for the help. Do you think this might be a little large for an adult versicolor?
No, not at all. In fact, my husband and I were looking at the enclosure and thinking we wouldn't put an adult in it. lol We are big fans of giving our Ts LOTS of space though, so that doesn't mean it isn't suitable. :)
 

Poxicator

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While I agree they don't have high humidity requirements, the misting is simply busywork and not needed, or accomplishing anything; unless you want the T to drink from the walls.

Here is a thread where Stan Schultz states that Ts aren't really known to die from fungal infections.

and here is one where he states that misting is unnecessary
the links you've provided are where Schultz is talking about Mexican species, quite different habitats than Avics. I also think you've misinterpreted what he says, its a little out of context I think.

Avics seem to do much better on drier conditions than they'll be found in their natural habitat. I think some of that is due to the lack of ventilation and stale conditions.
I'd think there is too much ventilation in your tub but it should be easy to alter that and your avic is likely to web over some of it. Unfortunately adult Avics dont like getting moved around so the creation of the web will probably be slow.
Its not the biggest of enclosures, so I take it this is small form versicolor?
I'd not bother with much or any substrate, you could use just sphagnum moss but you want plenty of arboreal furnishings. If you decide to not use substrate you could possible just pour water into the bottom to raise your humidity.
 

curiousme

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the links you've provided are where Schultz is talking about Mexican species, quite different habitats than Avics. I also think you've misinterpreted what he says, its a little out of context I think.
Perhaps, but I think this statement was meant to be a global one judging from the wording.

Pikaia said:
Mold is seldom a real issue with tarantulas. Enthusiasts who insist on keeping their tarantulas in damp cages complain about it constantly (Duh!), but we almost never hear of a tarantula dying of a mold or fungus infection.
As far as the misting, he has posted here alot recently and I feel has made it known that in his opinion misting is unnecessary. There are certain genera with higher humidity requirements, but Avicularia is not one of them. He recommends providing a larger wider water dish, or even adding a second dish and blocking of ventilation instead of moistening substrate as well. I will try and find a better post on it, but here is one with the list of genera.

That said, we don't follow the TKG utilitarian way of keeping Ts ourselves. We have planted enclosures and keep our Ts and plants more humid than what he recommends. Since Ts survive under a wide variety of care, T husbandry is more about personal preference, than a strict set of rules.
 

Poxicator

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I think if you read TKG you'll find Stan suggests dry substrates for all tarantula except the arboreals (see p163-164 of his first addition). And whilst this is acceptable for the pet tarantula more care should be taken for breeding. The misting issue is the same, it relates to terrestrials.
Personally I find a water dish on the substrate almost superfluous for Avics as they are very rarely found on the ground. Misting the web is quite likely to be an immitation of their natural occurence. My Avics seem to love moisture provided in this manner and are rarely found using the elevated water bowls - they web over them!

To my mind moulds are an indicator things in the enclosure are a little stale or too moist. Small amounts can be ignored but I believe remedies eg. ventilation, springtails and pillbugs should be sought.

I certainly advocate TKG as the bible of tarantula keeping but Im not in total agreement with everything, especially the alarmist reaction to mites.

Since Ts survive under a wide variety of care, T husbandry is more about personal preference, than a strict set of rules.
So very true. If it works for you then its right, even if a completely different system works for others. Good to hear the variety too.
 

curiousme

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I think if you read TKG you'll find Stan suggests dry substrates for all tarantula except the arboreals (see p163-164 of his first addition). And whilst this is acceptable for the pet tarantula more care should be taken for breeding. The misting issue is the same, it relates to terrestrials.
I see, we have different editions. :) In the 3rd edition, pg. 165-166, he explains why misting is a futile thing to be doing and not recommended. On pages 249-251 he explains their take on arboreal humidity regulation(and Avicularia in particular) and recommends a water dish that can take up the whole bottom of the enclosure and blocked off ventilation to achieve it. I hadn't pulled out the book yet, but was instead trying to find posts here on the forum to link to.

Personally I find a water dish on the substrate almost superfluous for Avics as they are very rarely found on the ground. Misting the web is quite likely to be an immitation of their natural occurence. My Avics seem to love moisture provided in this manner and are rarely found using the elevated water bowls - they web over them!
If the T needs water it will seek it out, whether it is up high or down low. I have seen our arboreals do both. That said, with Avics we almost always spray a little in the web, but we have caught them in the water dish too.

To my mind moulds are an indicator things in the enclosure are a little stale or too moist. Small amounts can be ignored but I believe remedies eg. ventilation, springtails and pillbugs should be sought.

I certainly advocate TKG as the bible of tarantula keeping but Im not in total agreement with everything, especially the alarmist reaction to mites.
We are in complete agreement. The TKG is perfect for beginners and they have done a beautiful job of writing it, so it is accessible to everyone.

So very true. If it works for you then its right, even if a completely different system works for others. Good to hear the variety too.
Exactly! :D
 

killy

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