A small blockage

CaiusV

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
9
So my B. vagans is in a jar half filled with a mix of peat moss and eco earth coconut fiber for substrate, with a bit of cork bark like a cave, a tiny rock just because, a couple sticks for decoration, and a small bit of sponge I shaped like a plant that I periodically spray with water. Just recently Red started to burrow under the cork bark. He's pushed all the dirt he's moved back just far enough that it completely blocks every centimeter of the entrance to his little cork cave. There's barely enough room between the back of the bark and the glass of the jar for him to get out. Is he doing this on purpose in preparing to molt? Should I dig in there and pull the dirt out of the entrance? Will he move it on his own if I don't? Anyone else notice this behavior in burrowing terestrials? He's only a quarter inch sling, should I be concerned or am I just being a paranoid parent?
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
It sounds like it is fine. My Ts move a lot of dirt around when setting up a home.

If you're really worried post a photo and we can see whats up.
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Sep 14, 2014
Messages
2,007
Nah -- don't go digging in his enclosure -- sounds like he has it the way he wants it. It is his home afterall. I adore Ts who bulldoze. And Ts like tight places -- they feel secure.
Short of a serious tunnel collapse, Ts know how to dig their way back out when they're ready.
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
hoffmanni enclosure.jpg
Here's a photo of one of my S. hoffmanni enclosures, tenant is 5/16", and dug a burrow under the cork.
Most slings burrow to avoid predation, natural instinct, nothing to worry about. Digging may cause stress or interrupt a molting process. I've a few Brachypelma species, as slings all burrowed, only exception B. sabulosum.
 

Lokee85

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 8, 2017
Messages
202
Burrowing is totally normal for many terresterials, especially as slings. I have several Brachypelma slings that have all burrowed to some extent, and most of them will close off their burrow when they're preparing for a molt, or they might do so when stressed. Just trust that the spider knows what it's doing. ;)

I do have one small bit of advice based on your OP, however: ditch the sponge, they're a major breeding ground for bacteria. You can provide your sling with a small dish or other container for water (some use bottle caps, Monopoly houses, small Legos, or tattoo ink caps, for example). Don't worry about them drowning, they float. Or you can moisten a small section of the substrate and the sling will drink directly from the ground.

Otherwise, it sounds like your little baby is just doing his spider thing. But if you're still concerned, you can post pics and more experienced keepers than I could give you great advice. Welcome to the best place for invert information. ;)
 

darkness975

dream reaper
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
3,906
So my B. vagans is in a jar half filled with a mix of peat moss and eco earth coconut fiber for substrate, with a bit of cork bark like a cave, a tiny rock just because, a couple sticks for decoration, and a small bit of sponge I shaped like a plant that I periodically spray with water. Just recently Red started to burrow under the cork bark. He's pushed all the dirt he's moved back just far enough that it completely blocks every centimeter of the entrance to his little cork cave. There's barely enough room between the back of the bark and the glass of the jar for him to get out. Is he doing this on purpose in preparing to molt? Should I dig in there and pull the dirt out of the entrance? Will he move it on his own if I don't? Anyone else notice this behavior in burrowing terestrials? He's only a quarter inch sling, should I be concerned or am I just being a paranoid parent?
Get rid of the sponge. All sponges do is attract mold and bacteria. A small water dish and the proper substrate moisture will provide the sufficient hydration.
 
Top