A.seemanni set up as seen in nature( Including pics)

14pokies

Arachnoprince
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I have seen pictures and videos of A.seemanni living in vertical burrows in nature, often constructed amongst tree roots.
I also noticed that there was a significant amount of fallen leaves covering the ground and some of the tarantulas even incorporated them into there burrows.

So when I acquired this specimen I decided to set it up similar to how I've seen in nature in order to see if it would take to the premade vertical burrow..

The enclosure is only 8×8 across by 11 inches deep. It has approximately 8 inches of coco fiber substrate for burrowing. I provided a vertical premade burrow of about 4 inches and left the other four so that the T could excavate as it see's fit.
I also provided dried water vine to simulate roots over the burrow as well as leaf litter.

I will eventually provide an enclosure atleast twice as deep after observing my T tonight. (Yes I know it's a waste of space in some peoples opinion but I don't care it's my space to waste and I feel it benefits the T)

It sat on top of the substrate for 3-4 days and upon checking on it tonight to offer prey I was happy to see this..

The T hanging out in it's burrow.
20161118_221405.jpg 20161118_222259.jpg This is the T attacking a Discoid roach from it's burrow.
 

Ellenantula

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Love it! Very nice.
My A seemanni just built a burrow about 3 weeks ago. For two+ years all she did was hang out by water dish (sometimes IN the dish, and yes, 1/3 of tank is kept slightly damp 'cuz I was told they like that). She just never attempted to dig at all and only occasionally went under her half-log hide. I kept reading about all these elaborate tunnel systems they could build....mine? Nada. And now? A true underground burrow!!!
Last time she moulted top side -- maybe this time she'll try it underground.
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
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Love it! Very nice.
My A seemanni just built a burrow about 3 weeks ago. For two+ years all she did was hang out by water dish (sometimes IN the dish, and yes, 1/3 of tank is kept slightly damp 'cuz I was told they like that). She just never attempted to dig at all and only occasionally went under her half-log hide. I kept reading about all these elaborate tunnel systems they could build....mine? Nada. And now? A true underground burrow!!!
Last time she moulted top side -- maybe this time she'll try it underground.
Thank you! Did she burrow vertically or horizontally?

I know alot of keepers will provided this species with relatively little sub and a hide as they do ok as terrestrials.. Some will often slope the sub so that one side is 2-3 inches and the other side is 5-6 so the T can burrow in at an angle.

In the reference that I have seen this species are living in burrows that look completely vertical and appear to be pretty deep.. I figured I would house him or her like a pet hole and see what happend...
 
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Trenor

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I've been collecting some broad leaves from Dad's to use in some of the rehousing that I'm getting ready to do. I'm trying to get some good branches to use as well. The setup looks good.
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
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I've been collecting some broad leaves from Dad's to use in some of the rehousing that I'm getting ready to do. I'm trying to get some good branches to use as well. The setup looks good.
Thanks man.. It's different than alot of seemanni enclosures you often see.. So far this T seems to be enjoying it's enclosure :)
 

Trenor

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I've been using fake leaves for my slings for a while now. I prefer it over the corkbark when the Ts are in Deli cups. Most of them make a leaf covered burrow and it's worked pretty well so far. A new enclosure I'm trying out should be here tomorrow so we'll see how it goes.
 

Ellenantula

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Thank you! Did she burrow vertically or horizontally?
Sorta both -- she dug straight to the bottom, kicking the substrate completely away, leaving a hole where the tank bottom is visible. And then she started tunneling east -- it's a true underground hideout. She hit wall on both sides so I can sort of see her through the glass, underground. She's got lots of space and substrate depth to make a complete tunnel system if she chooses. (fingers crossed)
Goes to prove deeper substrate IS important. :)
She does come out, esp to visit her water bowl, but most of the time she is in her new burrow.
 

14pokies

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Sorta both -- she dug straight to the bottom, kicking the substrate completely away, leaving a hole where the tank bottom is visible. And then she started tunneling east -- it's a true underground hideout. She hit wall on both sides so I can sort of see her through the glass, underground. She's got lots of space and substrate depth to make a complete tunnel system if she chooses. (fingers crossed)
Goes to prove deeper substrate IS important. :)
She does come out, esp to visit her water bowl, but most of the time she is in her new burrow.
Nice! In nature there is often a pile of dirt next to there burrow.. It seems as though they actively dig there own burrows wherever they see fit..

Yes, I agree... IMO any T that is an O/B in nature should be provided the space to create a burrow in captivity.

Tarantulas are very hardy though so I can't knock the keepers that fall into the minimalist category.. Everyone has there own way of setting up enclosures..
 

Trenor

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All of my Ts are given enough substrate to burrow if they choose to do so. I usually go pretty minimal with my slings though they seem to like the leaf setup I mentioned above. It gives them a good cover for when they burrow and almost all my slings have made use of it.

Here is one the the H.pulchripes deli containers. It has made a nice burrow underneath the two silk leaves I gave him when I moved him in. To me it was much better to use them instead of a clunky piece of cork given the limited size of the container and the over all size of the T when the enclosure was setup.
 

AphonopelmaTX

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Good for you for housing your tarantula based on how they live in nature. Do it with enough species and you will start to find that the traditional classifications for tarantula behavior: fossorial, terrestrial, and arboreal are nonsense. Patterns start to emerge where those categories are more based on captive conditions and what kind of disposition it has. There really is just two classifications: fossorial and arboreal. Besides, I always thought terrestrial meant "lives on land" as opposed to aquatic (lives in water) or arboreal (lives off of the ground, but not in water) and not necessarily lives in the land. I house just about everything in my collection as it was an obligate burrower within reason and it is very satisfying to only ever see the toes of a species that some say never burrow.

Now if only more people would consider the climate in which popular species come from when housing their tarantulas we would see more natural behavior. For instance, Brachypelma albopilosum and Aphonopelma seemanni come from tropical climates and really shouldn't be kept dry even if they can tolerate it in captivity.
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
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Good for you for housing your tarantula based on how they live in nature. Do it with enough species and you will start to find that the traditional classifications for tarantula behavior: fossorial, terrestrial, and arboreal are nonsense. Patterns start to emerge where those categories are more based on captive conditions and what kind of disposition it has. There really is just two classifications: fossorial and arboreal. Besides, I always thought terrestrial meant "lives on land" as opposed to aquatic (lives in water) or arboreal (lives off of the ground, but not in water) and not necessarily lives in the land. I house just about everything in my collection as it was an obligate burrower within reason and it is very satisfying to only ever see the toes of a species that some say never burrow.

Now if only more people would consider the climate in which popular species come from when housing their tarantulas we would see more natural behavior. For instance, Brachypelma albopilosum and Aphonopelma seemanni come from tropical climates and really shouldn't be kept dry even if they can tolerate it in captivity.
Thank you and I plan on doing more enclosures that represent the habitat that the tarantulas are found in not just the general conditions of the region, If that makes any sence.Lol...

It's difficult to find accurate collection data and is compounded by the variable habitats that Theraphosids can adapt to.. I'm piecing together what I can though and have two Genera that are next in line for "unconventional" set ups that are inspired by seeing how they live in the wild.. I have to get those females first though :)..

I have an avic set up coming soon though, I just recieved the enclosure.. Once I get her in there and she settles I'll create the thread..
 
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Estein

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I house just about everything in my collection as it was an obligate burrower within reason and it is very satisfying to only ever see the toes of a species that some say never burrow.
Do you usually make starter burrows for them, or do you find that they'll just dig their own when left to their own devices?

@14pokies Great looking enclosure!
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
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Thank you! Did she burrow vertically or horizontally?

I know alot of keepers will provided this species with relatively little sub and a hide as they do ok as terrestrials.. Some will often slope the sub so that one side is 2-3 inches and the other side is 5-6 so the T can burrow in at an angle.

In the reference that I have seen this species are living in burrows that look completely vertical and appear to be pretty deep.. I figured I would house him or her like a pet hole and see what happend...
Hi. My A. seemani has burrowed horizontally and vertically. I put a corkbark hide at an angle. She lurks at the "bottle neck." Also keep a third of substrate damp. She's slanted the area behind her hide herself.
I have a ton of bamboo leaf litter outside. My landlord doesn't like spraying so the ll will be safe. Is bamboo safe for the Beast?
 

Bugmom

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Good for you for housing your tarantula based on how they live in nature. Do it with enough species and you will start to find that the traditional classifications for tarantula behavior: fossorial, terrestrial, and arboreal are nonsense. Patterns start to emerge where those categories are more based on captive conditions and what kind of disposition it has. There really is just two classifications: fossorial and arboreal. Besides, I always thought terrestrial meant "lives on land" as opposed to aquatic (lives in water) or arboreal (lives off of the ground, but not in water) and not necessarily lives in the land. I house just about everything in my collection as it was an obligate burrower within reason and it is very satisfying to only ever see the toes of a species that some say never burrow.

Now if only more people would consider the climate in which popular species come from when housing their tarantulas we would see more natural behavior. For instance, Brachypelma albopilosum and Aphonopelma seemanni come from tropical climates and really shouldn't be kept dry even if they can tolerate it in captivity.
Tarantulas do some really neat things when you give them options. Like my adult female GBB here, who was given the choice to go vertical. She spends at least half her time off the ground now. The upper right portion of the photo shows the "home" she built herself on the ground; she dug an inch, at most. It's more like a trench than a burrow.


I thought keeping A. seemanni more humid was common knowledge. My albopilosum has made itself a nice little burrow under the half coconut hide. He's never made an actual burrow before, just moved dirt around a lot, but for reasons only he knows, has decided now's the time to have a cave.

 

ErinM31

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Do you usually make starter burrows for them, or do you find that they'll just dig their own when left to their own devices?
I make starter burrows for any species or individual that I know has a propensity to burrow and some seem to need this while others will make their burrows where they see fit regardless. ;)
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
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Do you usually make starter burrows for them, or do you find that they'll just dig their own when left to their own devices?

@14pokies Great looking enclosure!
This is only the third A.seemani I have kept and it's the first one I have set up this way. For this one I used a starter burrow for the previous two I housed them more like terrestrials with just a few inches of substrate and a hide..
 
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Crone Returns

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Tarantulas do some really neat things when you give them options. Like my adult female GBB here, who was given the choice to go vertical. She spends at least half her time off the ground now. The upper right portion of the photo shows the "home" she built herself on the ground; she dug an inch, at most. It's more like a trench than a burrow.


I thought keeping A. seemanni more humid was common knowledge. My albopilosum has made itself a nice little burrow under the half coconut hide. He's never made an actual burrow before, just moved dirt around a lot, but for reasons only he knows, has decided now's the time to have a cave.

It's his man cave
 

YagerManJennsen

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What substrate did you use? and how did you compact it for the tunnel to stay upright? I'm going to try this with my female and see what happens.
 

Crone Returns

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What substrate did you use? and how did you compact it for the tunnel to stay upright? I'm going to try this with my female and see what happens.
I use plain old eco-earth. My Demon Spawn has been out of her mind happy with it. There's a lot of burrows. The eco earth hasn't caved in except where she wanted it to. She's very happy, and I want to KEEP her happy -- know what I mean? ;)
 
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