A. seemani

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
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Mar 22, 2016
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990
Hi
Here's a kinda foggy pic of my rascal that sdsnybny sent me. I've had her a month and I just discovered the molt today. Yes she's too young to be sexed, but she's MINE so I get to call her a girl. Lol. 20160801_192322.jpg Oh yeah, she's BCF. Dang she's cute!
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
Seemani? I've never them that blue.
Yeah that blue may be my cell camera's deal. In real life she's got a little grey mixed in it. But the kid's blue! Way cute, and with a saucy attitude!
Got her in a good 4" of substrate. Corkbark, water dish. LOVES crickets.
 

Poec54

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Mar 26, 2013
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Yeah that blue may be my cell camera's deal. In real life she's got a little grey mixed in it. But the kid's blue! Way cute, and with a saucy attitude!
Got her in a good 4" of substrate. Corkbark, water dish. LOVES crickets.

They're a great species, beautiful and hardy. There's several that look similar, that are obviously closely-related. Don't know of they're subspecies or distinct species. In the 1970's there was a small battleship grey one in the pet trade, from Guatemala (4-5"). Also a less common one from Honduras that was a dark coffee-bean brown (5-6"), and even more scarce, the blue one we have now, from lower Central America. All of these forms have salmon pink undersides and spinnerets.
 

antinous

Pamphopharaoh
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Mar 28, 2013
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All of these forms have salmon pink undersides and spinnerets.
And that's what make this species beautiful (at least to me). I love the color of the underside spinnerets, couldn't help but buy a bunch of them haha.
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
They're a great species, beautiful and hardy. There's several that look similar, that are obviously closely-related. Don't know of they're subspecies or distinct species. In the 1970's there was a small battleship grey one in the pet trade, from Guatemala (4-5"). Also a less common one from Honduras that was a dark coffee-bean brown (5-6"), and even more scarce, the blue one we have now, from lower Central America. All of these forms have salmon pink undersides and spinnerets.
Yeah! I thought I was seeing things, but her underside is a salmon pink! Thanks for the information about the others.
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
And that's what make this species beautiful (at least to me). I love the color of the underside spinnerets, couldn't help but buy a bunch of them haha.
I think I'm gonna have to get more, but I need to grow my A. seemani and A. avic I got from sdsnybny. The E. sp Red and my curly B. albopilosum are adult.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
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I've love to get that grey Guatemalan one again. Haven't seen it in decades.

From what I've heard over the years, the vast majority of seemani are females. Males are highly coveted. Don't know if that's totally accurate, but don't waste your mature males.
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
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I've love to get that grey Guatemalan one again. Haven't seen it in decades.

From what I've heard over the years, the vast majority of seemani are females. Males are highly coveted. Don't know if that's totally accurate, but don't waste your mature males.
Ok. But I think she's a girl. If it's a boy, I'll send him out for breeding.
Why are most females? What makes that happen?
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
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Ok. But I think she's a girl. If it's a boy, I'll send him out for breeding.
Why are most females? What makes that happen?
I've looked online high and low, but couldn't find why the sex ratio.
According to some of the things I read it has to do with a lot of factors, including whether on sex is wanted. This applies to humans, but how would that apply to spiders, except that too many males would mean an overrunning the environment with slings?
 

Poec54

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Sex ratios are influenced by the distance the male has to travel, the terrain, predation, the proximity of females to each other, etc. They've carefully evolved over many thousands of years to fit the variables. For the survival of the species, the majority of females need to produce viable sacs annually. Unpaired females serve little purpose, as do excess males. There's no reason to believe any tarantula species has a 50/50 ratio. If the males have to travel miles in open terrain, and females are widely spread out, a lot of the males aren't going to make it. On the other hand, when females live in a group with a number of them concentrated in a small area, and a male is close by with ample foliage cover, one male can potentially service a number of females.

BTW, humans are born with 3 percentage points more males than females. By the time they reach maturity, the ratios are equal. Human males, like those of many species, compete for females and territory, and that thins out the population a little.
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
Sex ratios are influenced by the distance the male has to travel, the terrain, predation, the proximity of females to each other, etc. They've carefully evolved over many thousands of years to fit the variables. For the survival of the species, the majority of females need to produce viable sacs annually. Unpaired females serve little purpose, as do excess males. There's no reason to believe any tarantula species has a 50/50 ratio. If the males have to travel miles in open terrain, and females are widely spread out, a lot of the males aren't going to make it. On the other hand, when females live in a group with a number of them concentrated in a small area, and a male is close by with ample foliage cover, one male can potentially service a number of females.

BTW, humans are born with 3 percentage points more males than females. By the time they reach maturity, the ratios are equal. Human males, like those of many species, compete for females and territory, and that thins out the population a little.
I have to learn more.
 
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