A real news report from Sydney Australia

JacenBeers

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SYDNEY, Australia (Reuters) -- Thieves broke into a Sydney pet shop and stole 20 giant bird-eating spiders and 20 scorpions, police said on Tuesday, warning residents to avoid the potentially lethal arachnids. The thieves also stole 150 hermit crabs during a break-in late on Monday. "The owner of the store regards these spiders as one of the most dangerous in the world as their venom has a rapid effect on the human central nervous system, causing victims to lapse into coma and even death," police inspector David Hudson said in a statement. "These animals are very hard to miss as they resemble a tarantula ... with nine millimeter (0.35 inch) long fangs," Hudson said. Stephen Weeks, owner of the Urban Animals Pet Center from where the spiders -- Selenecosmia sterling -- were stolen, said he did not sell the spiders for pets but kept them for display mounting. He appealed to the thieves for their return. "I don't care if they get left in a box on the back step ... I just want them back," Weeks told reporters.


NOW MY QUESTION IS...WHAT DOES THIS SPIDER LOOK LIKE AND IS THIS STORY MANIPULATED TO SCARE THE PUBLIC OR ARE THEY REALLY THAT POISONOUS?
 

Vayu Son

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><

I think what they are reffering to is Selenocosmia stirlingi which is indeed a tarantula. AKA australian whistling/barking spider(do we have a stridulater here?)

Selenocosmiinae subfamily used to hold(among others) genera Poecilotheria, Psalmopeus, and of course Selenocosmia. Since then Psalmopeus has been moved to Aviculariinae, with Pokeys and the true Selenocosmia being given their own sub-categorys. Not sure if venom had an impact on these classifications.

1.They are a tarantula, not just "Resembling one".

2.I believe their venom is similar to OW species, perhaps even more significant. There is a bite report of another member of Selenocosmia on the forum here.

3.Steve nunn would be the real man to ask for all australian arachnids.


-V
 

JacenBeers

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THanks a lot Vayu SOn. And to the other person that replied, I think I would eat a tarantula before I would ever put one on my ass.
 

King_Looey

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The barking spider isnt too dangerous. It isnt too aggressive, but will attack if provoked. If it bites, it will put you in hospital, but deaths are uncommon. People have died however.
 

dilleo

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I saw a segment on animal planet about the whistling spider and it indeed does have some significant venom. I want one!

-Jeremy
 

Tarantula Lover

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hey

i never heard of this specie before, is there any sites on it? does it compare to the black widow, brown relusce, or Brazilian wonderers venom? that is really scary!!

James

P.S- thanks jacen fo letting us know!:(
 

King_Looey

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It isnt as bad as those other spiders, the venom will only kill animals and those in the highest risk groups, like the elderly or children.
 

belewfripp

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Re: ><

Originally posted by Vayu Son
I think what they are reffering to is Selenocosmia stirlingi which is indeed a tarantula. AKA australian whistling/barking spider(do we have a stridulater here?)

Selenocosmiinae subfamily used to hold(among others) genera Poecilotheria, Psalmopeus, and of course Selenocosmia. Since then Psalmopeus has been moved to Aviculariinae, with Pokeys and the true Selenocosmia being given their own sub-categorys. Not sure if venom had an impact on these classifications.

1.They are a tarantula, not just "Resembling one".

2.I believe their venom is similar to OW species, perhaps even more significant. There is a bite report of another member of Selenocosmia on the forum here.

3.Steve nunn would be the real man to ask for all australian arachnids.


-V

I'll just add that from what I have read, in Australia the term tarantula is generally used for North American theraphosids with the native theraphosids of Australia being called by a variety of other names including bird-eating spiders.


Adrian
 
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