a dog or cat eating a ( t )

phil jones

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this is hypothetical as i do not have a dog or cat but what if a ( t ) was eaten by one would the dog or cat be ill or would they be ok or spit the ( t ) out i allways wonder what would happen ? to the dog / cat --- phil
 

DrAce

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It's unlikely that anything permanent would happen to the cat or dog. Depending on the tarantula, there may be some skin (tongue, mouth, or throat) irritation.

In terms of venom action, again, it depends on alot.

If the venom was to get out into the pet's mouth then, again, it depends alot on the tarantula itself. The only effect externally may be some tingling in the mouth, or dry mouth (the ion channels in the surface of the tongue would probably get blocked up). Ultra-worst-case senario, I'd predict an ulcer.

Longer term, I wouldn't think anything. And all that above is worst-case senario stuff (as an informed guess). Most venoms are acid-sensitive, meaning that they would not make it past the stomach.
 

Talkenlate04

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Well, I think the dog might stand a chance at being bite somewhere in the mouth....... the cat would play with it till it was dead before making the decision to eat it......... In general I think the cat and dog would win most of the time I dont think they would chose to eat it though. Some might.

But some species venom Pokies come to mind might be strong enough to take down a dog or cat.......

There are a lot of what if and variables that cant be accounted for though in your question....

Poodle or Rottie?
Small feline or hybred lynx house cat. lol. Who knows all of this is theoretical.
 

TJPotter

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this is hypothetical as i do not have a dog or cat but what if a ( t ) was eaten by one would the dog or cat be ill or would they be ok or spit the ( t ) out i allways wonder what would happen ? to the dog / cat --- phil
I would be concerned if it was a T that possesses urticating hairs, and also, I think I remember hearing something about the potency of T venom when it comes to dogs and cats and the very negative consequences (so i would be concerned about the dog or cat getting bitten in the process of subduing and eating the spider)... I have no idea about a reference for that though. As for the health of the animal after eating the spider... They eat other spiders, and Humans eat tarantulas, so I would assume it would would have no ill effects (granted, when humans prepare them for eating, they burn off all the urt hairs). Beyond that, I have no clue!

Tucker
 
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DrAce

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The 'added' potency to cats and dogs isn't real, but it's a result of them being smaller, with faster metabolic rates, and getting the same dose as a bigger, slower, person (at least, that's a first estimate - they have the same basic biochemistry, but it runs a bit faster than ours).

Also, when people eat spiders, they've normally cooked 'em first. As far as I've noticed, they also miss the good bits at the front, focussing on the legs and abdomen - although I've only the National Geographic channel to back me up with that.

Certainly, ingesting venom is a completely different kettle-o-fish to getting it injected via a fang.

Talken is right, however, they're likely to get bitten before getting to the feast.
 

DrAce

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I might regret asking, but for what do you need a bucket?
 

DrAce

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From that picture, and the comment you posted with it, it looked like the cat did more damage to it's paw/leg than the spider did.

Cats and dogs tend to gnaw and nibble at spots that hurt, and more often than not, they get infections in there. You mention that the cat spent some time biting the area. It sure looked nasty in the picture.

Still, that's a little off the idea of a cat or dog 'eating' a tarantula. And I still think that if they did happen to ingest a spider, the spider wouldn't last long, and nor would the venom.
 

Leiurus87

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if i recall correctly, cats and dogs, in most cases, are more toxin resistant than humans, hence the reason cats and dogs were never used in those horrid bio-chemical weapons experiments back in the 50s and 60s.
 

phil jones

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the bucket thing was a JOKE as we say over here like pass the bucket some is going to be sick or vomit its called a sense of humour !!
 

ErikH

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I would think the urticating hairs (assuming we are talking NW species)would cause irritation of the digestive tract, but I have no idea how seriously. As far as venom goes, it is probably a big question mark. I know that there is some research to indicate that dogs are particularly sensitive to the venom of Australian tarantulas, with fatal encounters being reported.
 

Scourge

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Bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and canines
Isbister, JE Seymour, MR Gray, RJ Raven - Toxicon, 2003:

Spiders of the family Theraphosidae occur throughout most tropical regions of the world. There have only been three case reports of bites by these spiders in Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical effects of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders in both humans and canines. Cases of spider bite were collected by the authors over the period January 1978-April 2002, either prospectively in a large study of Australian spider bites, or retrospectively from cases reported to the authors. Subjects were included if they had a definite bite and had collected the spider. The spiders were identified by an expert arachnologist to genus and species level where possible. There were nine confirmed bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and seven in canines. These included bites by two Selenocosmia spp. and by two Phlogiellus spp. The nine spider bites in humans did not cause major effects. Local pain was the commonest effect, with severe pain in four of seven cases where severity of pain was recorded. Puncture marks or bleeding were the next most common effect. In one case the spider had bitten through the patient's fingernail. Mild systemic effects occurred in one of nine cases. There were seven bites in dogs (Phlogellius spp. and Selenocosmia spp.), and in two of these the owner was bitten after the dog. In all seven cases the dog died, and as rapidly as 0.5-2h after the bite. This small series of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders gives an indication of the spectrum of toxicity of these spiders in humans. Bites by these spiders are unlikely to cause major problems in humans. The study also demonstrates that the venom is far more toxic to canines.
 
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DrAce

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the bucket thing was a JOKE as we say over here like pass the bucket some is going to be sick or vomit its called a sense of humour !!
Sorry, but I understand that 'joke' but didn't get what was going to make you vomit - so I didn't get it.
 

DrAce

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Bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and canines
Isbister, JE Seymour, MR Gray, RJ Raven - Toxicon, 2003:

Spiders of the family Theraphosidae occur throughout most tropical regions of the world. There have only been three case reports of bites by these spiders in Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical effects of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders in both humans and canines. Cases of spider bite were collected by the authors over the period January 1978-April 2002, either prospectively in a large study of Australian spider bites, or retrospectively from cases reported to the authors. Subjects were included if they had a definite bite and had collected the spider. The spiders were identified by an expert arachnologist to genus and species level where possible. There were nine confirmed bites by spiders of the family Theraphosidae in humans and seven in canines. These included bites by two Selenocosmia spp. and by two Phlogiellus spp. The nine spider bites in humans did not cause major effects. Local pain was the commonest effect, with severe pain in four of seven cases where severity of pain was recorded. Puncture marks or bleeding were the next most common effect. In one case the spider had bitten through the patient's fingernail. Mild systemic effects occurred in one of nine cases. There were seven bites in dogs (Phlogellius spp. and Selenocosmia spp.), and in two of these the owner was bitten after the dog. In all seven cases the dog died, and as rapidly as 0.5-2h after the bite. This small series of bites by Australian theraphosid spiders gives an indication of the spectrum of toxicity of these spiders in humans. Bites by these spiders are unlikely to cause major problems in humans. The study also demonstrates that the venom is far more toxic to canines.
Dogs, cats and people all belong to very different branches of mammals. There's no really good reason to assume that venoms will have the same effect. The venom will attack the same pathway, which will be in common, but the dog or cat will probably suffer more from a dose-dependancy... they're smaller than us... and the venom will act faster because their metabolism is a little faster than ours.

This is all different from what Phil asked... he wanted to know about INGESTION of the tarantula, and I still think there wouldnt be any big effect.
 

phil jones

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thanks for all your replies and i hope it never happens to any dog / cat as just thinking about it and i feel ill :eek: :eek: so thanks and do not let it happen to any dog / cat we have -- phil
 
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