A couple of questions.

JoshBC

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May 23, 2016
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Can scorpions get cataracts? Wife snapped a pic of my Pandinus Cavimanus and one of his eyes are clearly silver. Is this an indicator of age?

Can you crossbreed scorpions? F Androctonus Amoreuxi with a M Androctonus Australis. Resized_20161015_120825.jpg
 

pannaking22

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Not sure about the first question, but the second is you definitely don't want to try to hybridize scorpions because their taxonomy is messy enough as is. Hybrids tend to decrease the quality of stock in the hobby and just add extra confusion later on, especially if someone wants to do scientific work with them.
 

JoshBC

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May 23, 2016
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Not sure about the first question, but the second is you definitely don't want to try to hybridize scorpions because their taxonomy is messy enough as is. Hybrids tend to decrease the quality of stock in the hobby and just add extra confusion later on, especially if someone wants to do scientific work with them.
Good to know. Thanks for the info.
 

Spidermolt

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I don't think so, I think that its just a reaction from the camera's light because of their sensitivity to UV lighting. breaking down my theory is that if you look into a mirror and shine a UV flashlight near your eye you will see that your pupils will turn white because your exposed to a concentrated UV ray but when you are in sunlight you look the same as any other lighting. Now if you take a scorpion which are famous for turning a bright blue/green under a a concentrated UV light their eyes will turn even while under a dim ray of sunlight so I imagine that the bright flash of a camera still contains enough minute rays of UV to enhance the white glow of the eyes in scorpions and not humans or other animals

This is my theory and I hope that it makes sense :)
 

JoshBC

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May 23, 2016
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I don't think so, I think that its just a reaction from the camera's light because of their sensitivity to UV lighting. breaking down my theory is that if you look into a mirror and shine a UV flashlight near your eye you will see that your pupils will turn white because your exposed to a concentrated UV ray but when you are in sunlight you look the same as any other lighting. Now if you take a scorpion which are famous for turning a bright blue/green under a a concentrated UV light their eyes will turn even while under a dim ray of sunlight so I imagine that the bright flash of a camera still contains enough minute rays of UV to enhance the white glow of the eyes in scorpions and not humans or other animals

This is my theory and I hope that it makes sense :)
Idk it's only that eye, and all the time. Regardless of lighting. Now that I know it's there I look everytime I look at the scorpion, and I can see it. It's odd for sure. I'm guessing cataract.
 

darkness975

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They cannot see well at all. Also I am unsure if their eyes are sophisticated enough to even develop this issue.

Most likely it is just a flaw. I had a P. imperator once that had a broken chela. It was intact but unable to be moved and so it was always held shut.
 
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