A. Chalcodes or G. Pulchripes?

Centaaronpede

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
6
Hey everyone, I recently made a post about what could be the best beginner T for an arachnophobe (check it out on my page for some backstory), however I think I have narrowed down which two T’s I like the most, those would be the A. Chalcodes and the G. Pulchripes. Could anyone give me more tips such as the pros/cons of both? Fluffier/thicker = cuter to me in my opinion, and I’d rather not have one that is prone to bolting/attitude problems. I’ve heard/seen G. Pulchripes can grow quite large and that isn’t a problem, I’d actually not prefer a tiny T for my first! I would also be wanting to find an established one preferably at least an inch and a half or more. Any info on this helps! (Sorry if this has been posted before, I could not find any info online comparing the two species directly. Thanks!)
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
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Mar 8, 2020
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85
To me pulchripes is the winner, but really over looks due to similarity of the two.

Pulchripes are docile, they can flick or threat pose but are incredibly predictable and slow when doing so. That’s quite a good quality for arachnophobes or beginners (but of course it varies between specimens). They’re also pretty enthusiastic eaters (not just of crickets, watch your fingers when s/he is bigger). They are one of the best looking beginner species and get quite big.

Chalcodes are again a very docile species but this varies (knew somebody who had one that flicked hairs every time the viv was opened but have seen some completely docile and cooperative specimens) Chalcodes do have a tendency to flick slightly more than pulchripes but, are pretty much the same in terms of docility and suitability as pulchripes. In my opinion (yours may differ) pulchripes looks better so wins. Except for that they are both practically the same.

May I ask why you left out the T. Albopilosus. They are docile, don’t really flick and they’re fluffiness definitely reduces the frightening aspects of T’s.
 

Sgt7212

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
10
While I don’t currently have either of those species, my vote between the 2 would be for the G. Pulchripes. That would purely be based on looks. I agree with the previous post about the T. Albopilosum and I’d even say E. Campestratus might be a decent choice.

The most important thing you can do is research and educate yourself as much as possible (which you appear to be doing), with general tarantula keeping methods and species specific requirements. And then keep learning... No matter how much anyone knows, we’re all still learning. so stay open to constructive input from others.

Tom Moran has a ton of really good and informative videos on YouTube. He has an updated “13 Best Beginner Species” and I’m sure he has species highlight videos for both of the ones you are considering. Watching them may help you narrow down your decision. His videos are very educational and cover topics like husbandry, disposition/ temperament (although regardless of species, that can differ wildly between T’s). He also provides insight on his own personal experience. Tom states in more than one of his videos that he started out as an arachnophobe, but his fascination with them helped him develop a healthy respect and a love for the hobby. He also purchased his first T from a US Marine. While I did not get my first T from Tom, things have come full circle because he greatly influenced this US Marine to get into the hobby. His channel is Tom’s Big Spiders, and he also has a blog/ podcast.

Coincidentally, I was always an arachnophobe, as well. At the same time, I’ve always been fascinated with nature and try to learn as much as I can. So a while back, I decided it was time to take the next step and get my first T. I’ve done well, so far, but am always reading, watching, learning. I am still a newbie and lack a lot of the advanced knowledge many of the members here have, but this forum is also an invaluable resource.
 

jezzy607

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Dec 29, 2002
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575
Definitely go for G. pulchripes. Adult A. chalcodes are all wild caught and slings take an eternity to grow, where as G. pulchripes are all captive bred and slings grow at a much more reasonable pace. I wouldn't pass on T. albopilosus though, however even adults sold by pet stores of that species are wild caught most often, but slings grow fast.
 

FrDoc

Gen. 1:24-25
Arachnosupporter
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Jul 18, 2017
Messages
756
I have both, and everything stated above generally applies. This is one of those rare situations where your personal subjective tastes regarding appearance, e.g., coloration, etc., should dictate. However, “gun to my head” decision, G. pulchripes.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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Mar 12, 2016
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Aphonopelma chalcodes - extremely slow growing, but long lived; can fast for several months, especially during the winter; adult females grow to about 5". Their temperament can range to both extremes - while they are generally more on the tolerant end, people have reported having very defensive individuals. Spiderlings, juveniles and even adults are easy to find in the United States, and are relatively inexpensive. In Canada they are much harder to find and sub-adults/adult females can run almost $200cdn.
My girl, Audrey, is one of my top favourites and has a very tolerant personality.

Grammostola pulchripes - medium growing with a lifespan around 20-25 years; can fast for several weeks prior to moulting, but mine have otherwise had a steady appetite; adult females can grow to about 7" on average, although people have reported having adult females closer to 8". Their temperament is pretty solid for being tolerant. My really old mature male sometimes kicks hair at me now, but my female never has. I don't think I have ever, even once, heard reports of a defensive Grammostola pulchripes, but that doesn't mean that they aren't out there. They are a bit more difficult to find, at least in Canada, and their availability has peaks and valleys. They are also fairly expensive in Canada, even for spiderlings, and generally cost about 3X what a Tliltocatl albopilosus will cost here.
I adore my female, Portia.
 

Centaaronpede

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
6
May I ask why you left out the T. Albopilosus. They are docile, don’t really flick and they’re fluffiness definitely reduces the frightening aspects of T’s.
I’d have to look into them more, I don’t know much about them!

I have both, and everything stated above generally applies. This is one of those rare situations where your personal subjective tastes regarding appearance, e.g., coloration, etc., should dictate. However, “gun to my head” decision, G. pulchripes.
That’s what I’m pretty much down to. I know the relative top 5-ish best beginner T’s and that they’re all relatively similar in general species temperament, now I’m sorting through which I believe to be the prettiest/most colorful out of those. PERSONALLY I think the A. Chalcodes is better looking than the G. Pulchripes which is why I really like the blondes.

Definitely go for G. pulchripes. Adult A. chalcodes are all wild caught and slings take an eternity to grow, where as G. pulchripes are all captive bred and slings grow at a much more reasonable pace. I wouldn't pass on T. albopilosus though, however even adults sold by pet stores of that species are wild caught most often, but slings grow fast.
Is it a big deal in the T world for wild caught vs captive bred as it is for other animals? I do keep a wide variety of lizards and snakes. Most of these animals coming from Africa/Australia/South America. The Australian ones it is basically impossible to get wild caught anymore. However there are significant differences in getting a wild caught vs captive bred in temperament for all of these.
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
Active Member
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Mar 8, 2020
Messages
85
Is it a big deal in the T world for wild caught vs captive bred as it is for other animals? I do keep a wide variety of lizards and snakes. Most of these animals coming from Africa/Australia/South America. The Australian ones it is basically impossible to get wild caught anymore. However there are significant differences in getting a wild caught vs captive bred in temperament for all of these.
Wild caught specimens can be ill or have parasites. They are also sometimes mated etc. and the age of the T is usually not determinable.The wild caught industry on a whole is unsustainable(unnecessary air miles etc.), even in the case of common species. There is no difference in temperament but by buying wild caught you are supporting an unsustainable trade and purchasing spiders with potential parasites and illness as well as indeterminable age.
 

octanejunkie

Arachnopeon
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Mar 12, 2018
Messages
22
I have both, although our are tiny slings lol

G. pulchripes is much more active and visible than our A. chalcodes, although as slings both are holes in the ground. G. pulchripes is a bulldozer compared to our tunnel-boring A. chalcodes. YMMV

You forgot Nhandu Chromatus
 

Asgiliath

Arachnoknight
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May 4, 2019
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266
I think they're lovely but chalcodes is the most boring species I have ever kept. They don't do much of ANYTHING as adults.

I agree with @cold blood. If you want to learn by actually being able to observe the spider doing something (anything!), i'd go with the pulchripes.
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
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@Centaaronpede, have you considered t.albopilosus yet? How bad is your arachnophobia as well? As stated their appearance makes things a lot less frightening. I don’t want to presume or project stereotypes (this is completely according to the arachnophobia of Centaaronpede) but is a large, active and enthusiastic eating spider the best choice for an arachnophobe? The pulchripes would be my first option but this may differ for an arachnophobe...?
 

Centaaronpede

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
6
@Centaaronpede, have you considered t.albopilosus yet? How bad is your arachnophobia as well? As stated their appearance makes things a lot less frightening. I don’t want to presume or project stereotypes (this is completely according to the arachnophobia of Centaaronpede) but is a large, active and enthusiastic eating spider the best choice for an arachnophobe? The pulchripes would be my first option but this may differ for an arachnophobe...?
I don’t know much about T. Albopilosus, my top three right now are G. Pulchripes, A, Chalcodes and B. Albopilosum! Also my arachnophobia stems more so from the fact that I’m afraid of where they /could/ be. I could put on a shoe or wake up in bed and have a brown recluse right there and I think that’s terrifying. Knowing where they’re at and as long as I can read their behavior, it isn’t bad to have a large and active T. I never had a phobia of snakes ever, but when I first started dating my girlfriend she had a corn snake I was reluctant to hold, however after only a few months we took in a 7 foot Carpet Python who is considerably more active and considerably more cranky, but I’ll hold him all day long! Now we have 4 constrictors :). Since I learned to read their behavior and when they’re in “nice mode” or pissed it makes it easier. Now that I’ve learned how you can judge when a T is angry/when you should leave it alone or not, it makes it much easier.
 

octanejunkie

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Messages
22
The 3 you mention (G. pulchripes, A. chalcodes and B. albopilosum) are all good beginner species, aka pet rocks once they mature. T. Albopilosus looks almost exactly like B. albopilosum; fuzzy.

Our first T was a curly hair (B. albopilosum) and we currently have G. pulchripes and A. chalcodes slings. The pulchripes is a lot more interesting than the chalcodes, the latter is basically a hole in the ground.

Their behaviour is pretty predictable, especially the new worlds, and they basically become part of the background of a typical home, they are not super active.
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
Active Member
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Mar 8, 2020
Messages
85
The 3 you mention (G. pulchripes, A. chalcodes and B. albopilosum) are all good beginner species, aka pet rocks once they mature. T. Albopilosus looks almost exactly like B. albopilosum; fuzzy.

Our first T was a curly hair (B. albopilosum) and we currently have G. pulchripes and A. chalcodes slings. The pulchripes is a lot more interesting than the chalcodes, the latter is basically a hole in the ground.

Their behaviour is pretty predictable, especially the new worlds, and they basically become part of the background of a typical home, they are not super active.
I thought T Albipilosus is simply the revised latin for B.Albopilosum(both the same sp.)Having been removed from brachypelma and revised to Titlocatl. Is this correct?
 
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