A behlei

Brandon

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
415
Ernie,
Down by tuscon? in that case its not A behlei, the name slips my mind A behlei only occure around Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon. Infact there might not be a Sci name for this. I would contact a local tarantula Athority, or email me privatally at versicolorking@aol.com and i would be more than happy to help you out.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

Brandon

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
415
Mr T,,
The range they refer to is in northern AZ. I live in az as well and collect to. I am no expert but there are 3 species that look like A behlei that live in AZ. The range of A behlei is northern AZ and northern NM, Tuscon is far to south to be in that range. I strongly fill you have something else.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

MrT

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 13, 2002
Messages
2,174
Very well could be, Brandon.
What do you think it is?
Its was very blonde when collected. After the last molt it went almost black.
I'll try to get a better pic. to post.;)

Ernie
 

dilleo

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 26, 2002
Messages
111
If you live in arizona try to take it to a shop. I know there are some shops there that have some expert on the native Aphonopelma there and would be happy to id it.

-Jeremy
 

VI6SIX

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 14, 2002
Messages
64
Its was very blonde when collected. After the last molt it went almost black.


Ernie [/B][/QUOTE] are you sure it's not a male?
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
Ernie + Brandon-

I collected some tarantulas very much like the the one in Ernie's pic, also in the Tucson area (about an hour south in Rio Rico). They have about a 3" legspan and are stocky and heavy. At first, I believed they were immature (and very dark) A. chalcodes, but I also collected some males that appeared to be the same species (much smaller and blacker than A. chalcodes males). I thought at one point that they were A. paloma, but I learned they were too big to be that. They also (the females) have a redish setae on the abdomen, while A. paloma is supposed to be all black. Like Ernie's, mine are also much darker folowing a molt, but this common with many Aphono's, so it may not mean much. Annother interesting thing was that they were all collected in a parking lot, wandering around. Normal for males, but kind of unusual for females, I thought. A recent heavy rainstorm may have driven them from the burrows, but they seemed to be taking advantage of the insects that had been drawn to the lights.

Anyway, if anyone gets a line on what they are, I'd love to know myself!

Wade
 
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