A. avic Cohab Experiment

Do you think A. Avic can be cohabbed together successfully under ideal conditions?

  • Yes

  • No


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Ichor

Arachnopeon
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Oct 29, 2016
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So I've seen a lot of back and forth about whether or not cohabbing A. avics successfully is possible without ending up dead specimens. Some people have done it for years without issue, others have had no such luck, but they do seem to have the most potential for cohabbing with one another out of typically antisocial T species'. I will likely be picking up a pair of Pink Toe slings tomorrow, and I would like to make this thread to document this little experiment from start to finish. Nothing science-y, just a somewhat casual attempt to see if its possible!

Most success seems to come from large environments, where the spiders can get away from one another whenever they wish. Lots of hides, lots of climbing space, and lots of food seems to be the ideal way to set them up, so that's what I'll be doing.

The slings are about 2'' right now and will be housed in a vertical, fully bioactive tank. I will be adding springtails and isopods at a later time, once the environment is stable enough for them.

I invite everyone to follow this experiment, as well as throw in any tips they might have as we go along! I'll be including lots of pictures in my updates! :)
 

cold blood

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Experiment? I think you are destined for one real fat one. They can start munching each other right at 2i.
 

mistertim

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If you need to make the enclosure big enough that they don't interact with each other I wouldn't necessarily call that a cohabitation. More like isolation without being in separate enclosures.
 

Ichor

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P.Novak is a user here who kept them together successfully for 4 months- for breeding purposes- back in 2007 without incident. It was a relatively short time of course, being only 4 months, but it was, technically, successful. A great many care sheets floating around also assure that cohabitation is possible, although there are also just as many saying it's not. As 2007 is really the most recent incident I can find on arachnoboards about it, I was hoping to see if I could get more recent data on the subject on a first hand account, that's all~

The enclosure won't be enormous, probably just a 30ish gallon vertical, but I've got Pothos and Bromeliad to plant in it as well as tons of climbing branches, lots of places to hide.

These particular two slings are from the same sac, and my breeder has told me that often helps decrease aggression... I'm certainly not 100% sure that this is going to work, but I thought I'd at least document the process. I'm not advocating for cohabbing, I just want recent data to convince me one way or another that A. avics can or cannot be cohabbed successfully. I'm well aware that a vast majority of Ts cannot be housed together at all, but I would like to give these one's a shot, just because of how often I've heard that they are an exception.

You guys are more than welcome to share your thoughts!

--Addition; If you are all vehemently against the idea, I will certainly take your advice into account and stop the experiment. The last thing I want to do is waste everyone's time on something already doomed to fail. I'm just a person who likes to know absolutely 'yes or no' on such topics.

Like even with this thread- http://arachnoboards.com/threads/pink-toe-colonies.21030/
It's a super old thread, but same thing, some people saying they've kept just 2 together fine, others saying that it doesn't work, but no real answer except that keeping lower numbers together seems to work out better than higher numbers.
 
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Najakeeper

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It will work until one of them is hungry and mistakes the movement for prey. This can happen in one day, one year or not in their lifetime depending on luck and enclosure size. It is that simple in my opinion.
 
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Rittdk01

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Oct 4, 2016
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First tarantula I ever got. Did some research and saw that they could be put together on several sites and care sheets. I got a big vertical enclosure that opens from the front for my big one. Got a little one a few months later with the thought of putting them together. Learned more and realized that would be a grave mistake. Muffin is the little one and one of my very favorites, so I wouldn't risk it.

I also got three h. Gigis slings w thoughts of cohabitation, but I know I won't want to risk it.
 

Teal

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As someone else pointed out, having an enclosure big enough for the spiders to avoid each other is NOT cohabitation... that is just hoping the spiders don't cross each others' paths and get eaten. It is folly. I don't understand the desire to force animals to live together who are solitary in nature.
 

Andrea82

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The only time I've heard about keeping succesfully two Avicularia sp together was when breeding. But even then, the male was pulled out as soon as he finished his business.
The idea may be great, but in reality, I would never put two Avicularia sp. together.
 

mistertim

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As someone else pointed out, having an enclosure big enough for the spiders to avoid each other is NOT cohabitation... that is just hoping the spiders don't cross each others' paths and get eaten. It is folly. I don't understand the desire to force animals to live together who are solitary in nature.
Yeah I don't get it either. The driver here seems to be pure curiosity or just some desire to do it by the OP. It obviously isn't driven by what is best for the spiders which, in the case of pretty much any tarantula outside of a couple species, is isolation. Seems borderline sadistic to me.
 

Ichor

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Seems borderline sadistic to me.
Well that's a bit rude.

As I've mentioned before, there are several places and care sheets, as well as a couple of breeders, who believe A. avic can be cohabbed. Knowing as I do that Ts are generally antisocial, the discrepancy with this particular species was odd, and surely has to have come from somewhere. With no recent data to work with, it's impossible to say.

That said, as the great majority don't believe it can be done, I have no interest in investing myself or my spiders in a project doomed to failure, so I'll be discontinuing the experiment. If the current community does not believe it could herald any useful results then there's no point to putting them in unnecessary danger.
I thank everyone who commented and shared their advice! (Except for rude guy) I have taken it into account and will not be pursuing the experiment! :)
 

BobBarley

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Well that's a bit rude.

As I've mentioned before, there are several places and care sheets, as well as a couple of breeders, who believe A. avic can be cohabbed. Knowing as I do that Ts are generally antisocial, the discrepancy with this particular species was odd, and surely has to have come from somewhere. With no recent data to work with, it's impossible to say.

That said, as the great majority don't believe it can be done, I have no interest in investing myself or my spiders in a project doomed to failure, so I'll be discontinuing the experiment. If the current community does not believe it could herald any useful results then there's no point to putting them in unnecessary danger.
I thank everyone who commented and shared their advice! (Except for rude guy) I have taken it into account and will not be pursuing the experiment! :)
Try looking into Monocentropus balfouri communals as well as Neoholothele (previously Holothele) incei communals. N. incei have been witnessed in the wild communally, and M. balfouri have tons of recent and successful communals including @Formerphobe and (I think) @Blue Jaye . From what I remember, the more space, the better. I think Formerphobe (correct me if I'm wrong) compared it to a neighborhood. People in a friendly neighborhood often come over to have a party, but they do not have parties everyday. Something like that lol.
 

Ichor

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Try looking into Monocentropus balfouri communals as well as Neoholothele (previously Holothele) incei communals. N. incei have been witnessed in the wild communally, and M. balfouri have tons of recent and successful communals including @Formerphobe and (I think) @Blue Jaye . From what I remember, the more space, the better. I think Formerphobe (correct me if I'm wrong) compared it to a neighborhood. People in a friendly neighborhood often come over to have a party, but they do not have parties everyday. Something like that lol.
Thank you! I'll look into those species fo'sho.
I also like the metaphor lol... but hey as long as it works for them!
 

Blue Jaye

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I've seen many an A.avic set up as a communal. It has never ended well. M.balfouri on the other hand do live and thrive together very well. As long as there's enough real estate to go around it should be a peaceful, happy neighborhood.
 

Teal

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Yeah I don't get it either. The driver here seems to be pure curiosity or just some desire to do it by the OP. It obviously isn't driven by what is best for the spiders which, in the case of pretty much any tarantula outside of a couple species, is isolation. Seems borderline sadistic to me.
Agreed!

Well that's a bit rude.

I thank everyone who commented and shared their advice! (Except for rude guy) I have taken it into account and will not be pursuing the experiment! :)
How is it rude? Someone who plans to put animals together knowing there is a huge chance they will kill each other sort of fits the definition...
 

viper69

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but it was, technically, successful.
4 months is successful?? You have a very limited definition. What is successful is keeping a communal throughout the entire life cycle. 4 months is NOT technically successful.

By your subjective definition, someone would just easily think 2 months is "technically successful".

The link you provided isn't supportive at all of an Avic communal. By and large, the majority said "no" in some fashion.

They aren't known to be communal animals in the wild to the best of my knowledge.

Care sheets?? You are relying on Care sheets for info in part????? CARE SHEETS KILL TARANTULAS because they are filled with true and UNTRUE info. Leading the reader to not know what is true and false. That's why they are so dangerous.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
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Jul 27, 2016
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Well that's a bit rude.

As I've mentioned before, there are several places and care sheets, as well as a couple of breeders, who believe A. avic can be cohabbed. Knowing as I do that Ts are generally antisocial, the discrepancy with this particular species was odd, and surely has to have come from somewhere. With no recent data to work with, it's impossible to say.

That said, as the great majority don't believe it can be done, I have no interest in investing myself or my spiders in a project doomed to failure, so I'll be discontinuing the experiment. If the current community does not believe it could herald any useful results then there's no point to putting them in unnecessary danger.
I thank everyone who commented and shared their advice! (Except for rude guy) I have taken it into account and will not be pursuing the experiment! :)
But you have already stated it is an experiment which means there is no defined actual steps for success. Your experiment depends on a dice roll based on the huge majority.
 

Formerphobe

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...and M. balfouri have tons of recent and successful communals including @Formerphobe and (I think) @Blue Jaye . From what I remember, the more space, the better. I think Formerphobe (correct me if I'm wrong) compared it to a neighborhood. People in a friendly neighborhood often come over to have a party, but they do not have parties everyday. Something like that lol.
I don't think it was me that said that. Mine all live together in the same burrow, always have, over 4 years now. They have room to spread out, but dont.
 
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