A. Australis/LQ longetivity

Poec9090

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I used to keep a number of scorps in the past. Mostly arid species I was interested in. I have been doing some reading and learning from other keepers recently.

I used to keep my LQ and A. Australis the same. 90-92 degrees F until night time the temps would be dropped lower.

I kept them like this for years with no issues. However, recent things I've been reading is that their lifespans can be longer with less feeding and heat.

What is everyone's take on this?
 

Ferrachi

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I used to keep a number of scorps in the past. Mostly arid species I was interested in. I have been doing some reading and learning from other keepers recently.

I used to keep my LQ and A. Australis the same. 90-92 degrees F until night time the temps would be dropped lower.

I kept them like this for years with no issues. However, recent things I've been reading is that their lifespans can be longer with less feeding and heat.

What is everyone's take on this?
I was told the same by a few breeders and keepers...
 

RoachCoach

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If I can interject with some semi pertinent info. That goes true for almost all? inverts that reproduce fairly fast. The closer to the highest tolerance temp and food availability the faster they reproduce and the faster their metabolism is. Same goes for mammals. Faster metabolism faster life. Life fast die young. YEET
 

Outpost31Survivor

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I used to keep a number of scorps in the past. Mostly arid species I was interested in. I have been doing some reading and learning from other keepers recently.

I used to keep my LQ and A. Australis the same. 90-92 degrees F until night time the temps would be dropped lower.

I kept them like this for years with no issues. However, recent things I've been reading is that their lifespans can be longer with less feeding and heat.

What is everyone's take on this?
Yes they will live longer especially if you offer them a winter hibernation period, simply they grow slower and molt less frequently at say 75-85F.

But the downside is lower temps can increase risk of bad molts.
 
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Outpost31Survivor

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Zucht von Skorpionen und SpinnenMenu

This table show the time, the scorpions needed to reach aduldhood in my breedingstock.
I raise my scorpions at moderate temperatures and with hibernations, so the time is much longer than under constant "perfect" conditions.
It´s possible to raise them much faster, but i belive it´s the best way, to simulate the conditions in the natural habitats.

W = Weeks
M = Months
J = Years
/ = Seperates different animals



 

Poec9090

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Yes they will live longer especially if you offer them a winter hibernation period, simply they grow slower and molt less frequently at say 75-85F.

But the downside is lower temps can increase risk of bad molts.

Yes thats true. Which is why I was confused about this. Its interesting to say the least though.
 

ignithium

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It is very true. The scorpions has only certain amount moults in its life, and the faster it will grow, the faster it will moults. More food and highers temperatures means it need to moult sooner. Stretching the time between moult will extend the lifespan, and also reduce the adult size of scorpion. I keep mine at much lower temperature than most keeper, and result is they live longer but are smaller and much longer gestation period (also generally fewer brood size). For my experience there is no other consequence of this with high desert species, but with tropical species it can cause some health problem if done incorrectly as mentioned by other poster in this thread. For example, in south of asia there is seasonal change not only of temperature but also of corresponding amount of moisture, light exposure, and even atmosphere pressure in the wild. If change only temperature in captivity, it can cause problem. High desert specie like androctonus and leiurus is easiest to keep this way, due to they must endure a huge range of condition in the nature.
Other example is with savannah specie like babycurus, when i try to doing this or even simulate seasons they are just dying, its possible im clown and do it incorrectly.
 
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