2" Sling housing, will this do?

Otesha

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May 10, 2016
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My first T I bought when he was about 3 and a half inches and I did a terrible job, but he managed to deal with my shortcomings and survive past it all. This time around, I have 3 more, 2 B. Smithi, both 2" and my G.Pulchra, 3 and a half inches. The G. Pulchra has been in the same housing since I got it, and has done very well, but the two wee things I'm not sure if I've done it right. They have their hides since they're both lazy borrowers at the moment, but I don't know if I have too much substrate. I stacked it up so if they tried to explore the top of their containers, a fall wouldn't hurt them, but I also don't want them deciding one day to start digging to the middle of the earth and end up burring themselves alive. here are some pictures, the white stuff is calcium sand to try and help soak up any access dampness. (Recently has a REALLY bad mite issue with their last homes being too damn and not drying out, due to living in a cooler basement. The sand, along with some pillbugs they eventually ate, solved the issue perfectly, though!)

IMG_3657.JPG IMG_3659.JPG
 

johnny quango

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May 17, 2013
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Firstly don't fret about your tarantulas being buried alive it isn't going to happen they have an amazing ability to get back out. I have a smithi that's smaller than your 2 at around 1.5" and that never burrows or uses the hide i provided it just sits there like a potato (actually a potato probably moves more).
The enclosures look fine to me I'd just tweek them a little for the Brachys give them an hide that isn't clear as I've found some of mine will use hides more if they let less light through and if you need to rehouse or change the substrate in the future bake it rather than adding sand i personally don't use it as i don't feel it's needed. On a side note you have a couple of great species there and they're pretty much bulletproof so just feed,water and wait i mean really wait for something to happen from them.
 

KezyGLA

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Apr 8, 2016
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It isnt the wrong size. You have the right amount of substrate. I have never heard of calcium sand being used to combat mould in a tarantulas enclosures.

It shouldnt be needed if you are keeping the substrate dry. It should be fine without the calcium sand.

What temperatures are they kept at?

Mould can be prevented by supplying a larger water dish and not overflowing it.

I am curious as to what you mean by "don't think they are doing well". What makes you think that they arent doing well?

I'm not trying to give you a hard time, just curious..

EDIT: As mentioned above, the Brachys will utilize a hide if they see necessary, but I dont think clear hides are much use. I also agree that they dont do much and you shouldnt worry about the burrowing. They are oppertunist burrowers and will only do so if an appropriate hide is not provided :)
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
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May 10, 2016
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Firstly don't fret about your tarantulas being buried alive it isn't going to happen they have an amazing ability to get back out. I have a smithi that's smaller than your 2 at around 1.5" and that never burrows or uses the hide i provided it just sits there like a potato (actually a potato probably moves more).
The enclosures look fine to me I'd just tweek them a little for the Brachys give them an hide that isn't clear as I've found some of mine will use hides more if they let less light through and if you need to rehouse or change the substrate in the future bake it rather than adding sand i personally don't use it as i don't feel it's needed. On a side note you have a couple of great species there and they're pretty much bulletproof so just feed,water and wait i mean really wait for something to happen from them.
The hides I have in there are only partly out of the ground, they're about 3 inches long and go deep in, so they both can go into their respected plastic hides and be fully hidden under the substrate, one likes to sit in there most of the day out of sight, the other only wanders in for an hour or so throughout the day. The sand thing was something I read on another part of the forums here when it mentioned it helped keep it dry if there was a mite problem. There was, but now that it's dealt with, I'll take your advice and refrain from using it again, possibly try baking it in the future if needed. A bit more relaxing knowing they'll be okay with how much I have in there though! Thank you very much! :3
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
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May 10, 2016
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30
It isnt the wrong size. You have the right amount of substrate. I have never heard of calcium sand being used to combat mould in a tarantulas enclosures.

It shouldnt be needed if you are keeping the substrate dry. It should be fine without the calcium sand.

What temperatures are they kept at?

Mould can be prevented by supplying a larger water dish and not overflowing it.

I am curious as to what you mean by "don't think they are doing well". What makes you think that they arent doing well?

I'm not trying to give you a hard time, just curious..

EDIT: As mentioned above, the Brachys will utilize a hide if they see necessary, but I dont think clear hides are much use. I also agree that they dont do much and you shouldnt worry about the burrowing. They are oppertunist burrowers and will only do so if an appropriate hide is not provided :)
It wasn't really a mold issue, but a Mite infestation. I read on here a while back that calcium sand helped keep the substrate dryer if it was too damn and wasn't drying out over the course of a few days. My basement doesn't really allow for things to dry out very easy, so it helped a bit, but now that the issue has been resolved and it's all nice and dry and the mites are all dead and gone, I will be sure to not add the sand next time, as you're right, it's not really needed. As for saying they're not doing very well, I didn't mean to put it that way, I was more worried if I had done something wrong before a problem arose, so figured it better to ask for advice before something did, and luckily, all appears to be well and good! :D The G. Pulchra appears to be as chill as ever as well, so I've no worried about how I got that little one set up. It's good to know though that the sand is not needed, it was playing on my mind a bit.
As for their temps, they're kept at around 20c - 30c. If the basement im in gets chilly in the winter, I learned with my first that instead of adding any sort of heat pads or lams, I just wrap the sides in a Tshirt and it's done wonders with keeping the temp very level. :D
 

KezyGLA

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If you have rehoused them recently then they could just take a little while to settle in. I'm glad to hear its dry and there are no more mites.

Temps are great at 19C-25C for all of these. In the winter you just wrap a Tshirt around the enclosures? Are you sure that works? I would think that a Tshirt straight off your back may give wormth for a minute but if its cold in the basement in the winter surely the Tshirt would get cold and not insulate much, if any. o_O

Oil/space heaters work wonders in the winter. Maybe give that a try? :)
 

Otesha

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May 10, 2016
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If you have rehoused them recently then they could just take a little while to settle in. I'm glad to hear its dry and there are no more mites.

Temps are great at 19C-25C for all of these. In the winter you just wrap a Tshirt around the enclosures? Are you sure that works? I would think that a Tshirt straight off your back may give wormth for a minute but if its cold in the basement in the winter surely the Tshirt would get cold and not insulate much, if any. o_O

Oil/space heaters work wonders in the winter. Maybe give that a try? :)
I can give it a try if it gets beyond a point where I know I'll be able to keep them warm, but so far it's worked for the past 2 years. It doesn't get Horribly cold, where you can see your breath or anything of that sort, just enough that a little bit of something helps keep it in a safe range. That, and shirts straight from the dryer are wonderful too, without having to buy more heaters that I would only use for a short period of time. Again though, if it every got close to where they the temp dropped below 20c, I would quickly invest in another space heater if I can't find the one I used to have. >__>; Other then that! Everything else is comfy it seems, one of them ate lastnight too, so I think they're going to be content for quite some time. :3
 

bryverine

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I can give it a try if it gets beyond a point where I know I'll be able to keep them warm, but so far it's worked for the past 2 years. It doesn't get Horribly cold, where you can see your breath or anything of that sort, just enough that a little bit of something helps keep it in a safe range. That, and shirts straight from the dryer are wonderful too, without having to buy more heaters that I would only use for a short period of time. Again though, if it every got close to where they the temp dropped below 20c, I would quickly invest in another space heater if I can't find the one I used to have. >__>; Other then that! Everything else is comfy it seems, one of them ate lastnight too, so I think they're going to be content for quite some time. :3
Unfortunately you won't see that shirt (even from the dryer) stay warm for much more than an hour in a cool room.

Insulating tarantulas alone won't keep the enclosure warm for long and certainly won't allow it to warm up (you know with the whole "not producing body heat" thing). If anything, heat up several liters of clean, pure water and put it in a container (e.g. a soda bottle) and throw it under a blanket with them.
 

Haemus

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Feb 11, 2016
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The temperature change is what I hate most about fall/spring. Certain days its +15C, other days its closer to zero lol.

If your basement temp is +20C you're good, but a temperature increase would help dry out that substrate :)
 

Otesha

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May 10, 2016
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Unfortunately you won't see that shirt (even from the dryer) stay warm for much more than an hour in a cool room.

Insulating tarantulas alone won't keep the enclosure warm for long and certainly won't allow it to warm up (you know with the whole "not producing body heat" thing). If anything, heat up several liters of clean, pure water and put it in a container (e.g. a soda bottle) and throw it under a blanket with them.
The bottle idea sounds brilliant, I like that! If it gets colder here, I'll do that for sure. It's still a comfy 23c at the moment in the room we're in, has been for the past few weeks, I'll save a bottle today to keep at the ready! My grandmother also just gave me an electric heating pad, I know not to keep to too close cause of over heating concerns, but it's another option. (Family's in a bit of financial strain, wont be able to go buy anything for a while, so these options would work well for now) <3!
 

darkness975

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I prefer to use hides that do not have an "end" on the back side. For my arid terrestrials I use those half logs. If it wants to burrow past the end it can.
 

bryverine

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The bottle idea sounds brilliant, I like that! If it gets colder here, I'll do that for sure. It's still a comfy 23c at the moment in the room we're in, has been for the past few weeks, I'll save a bottle today to keep at the ready! My grandmother also just gave me an electric heating pad, I know not to keep to too close cause of over heating concerns, but it's another option. (Family's in a bit of financial strain, wont be able to go buy anything for a while, so these options would work well for now) <3!
Those electric blankets would work well, but you have to be very careful because those suckers get HOT! Just try it out with a temperature monitor first if you have one.

If anything, I'd set part of the electric blanket in with the Ts under a different blanket.
 

Otesha

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May 10, 2016
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Those electric blankets would work well, but you have to be very careful because those suckers get HOT! Just try it out with a temperature monitor first if you have one.

If anything, I'd set part of the electric blanket in with the Ts under a different blanket.
Sounds good, I'll definitely give that a try, and there's not much time I'm not around them, so I'll be able to keep a very very close eye on it, as well as them at all times!
 

Otesha

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I prefer to use hides that do not have an "end" on the back side. For my arid terrestrials I use those half logs. If it wants to burrow past the end it can.
I had a few half logs, but during the mite issue and the dampness, they started to mold, so I threw them out right away. I get where you're coming from, and I agree, it's a better idea to have no end, but these were all I had at the moment and those half logs sell for 10$ each, the smallest ones where I'm at and to get 3 of them is a bit more than I can afford at this very moment, but after they've relaxed a bit, I can switch them out for some cut tubing which should be a lot cheaper, but if they dislike that, then I will save up for the half logs again.
 

Andrea82

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I had a few half logs, but during the mite issue and the dampness, they started to mold, so I threw them out right away. I get where you're coming from, and I agree, it's a better idea to have no end, but these were all I had at the moment and those half logs sell for 10$ each, the smallest ones where I'm at and to get 3 of them is a bit more than I can afford at this very moment, but after they've relaxed a bit, I can switch them out for some cut tubing which should be a lot cheaper, but if they dislike that, then I will save up for the half logs again.
You could use halfs from a plastic flowerpot, a piece of driftwood from a nearby lake or river or sea. Bake it to remove all nasties. Doesn't have to cost much at all. :)
 

Otesha

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You could use halfs from a plastic flowerpot, a piece of driftwood from a nearby lake or river or sea. Bake it to remove all nasties. Doesn't have to cost much at all. :)
Ouuu~ I really like the driftwood idea. I'm gonna try that next time I can get down to Oakville or something. :D
 

Moonohol

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I had a few half logs, but during the mite issue and the dampness, they started to mold, so I threw them out right away. I get where you're coming from, and I agree, it's a better idea to have no end, but these were all I had at the moment and those half logs sell for 10$ each, the smallest ones where I'm at and to get 3 of them is a bit more than I can afford at this very moment, but after they've relaxed a bit, I can switch them out for some cut tubing which should be a lot cheaper, but if they dislike that, then I will save up for the half logs again.
Those half logs are overrated anyways. Just one more idea for you to consider: I make my own hides by buying pieces of cork tube and sectioning them out with a handsaw.
 

cold blood

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Driftwood is about all I use. I bake it, but it has nothing to do with "nasties", its baked to remove any residual water the wood might be holding, as that is what will cause your wood to mold faster than anything.
 

cold blood

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Doesn't have to cost much at all. :)
That's one thing many newcomers don't realize..this hobby is only as expensive as you make it...good quality housing can easily be had at dirt cheap prices. My average adult set up costs about $8 or less...and the container costs $6 of that 8.
 

Andrea82

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That's one thing many newcomers don't realize..this hobby is only as expensive as you make it...good quality housing can easily be had at dirt cheap prices. My average adult set up costs about $8 or less...and the container costs $6 of that 8.
True. Although i must say I am currently saving up some money to buy more aesthetically pleasing enclosure for when my slings/juvies grow up. I have a B.kahlenbergi who molted last week and got its adult coloration, and he/she is stunning :).
 
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