filistata hibernalis

  1. Post-molt Feed (♀ Kukulcania hibernalis)

    Post-molt Feed (♀ Kukulcania hibernalis)

    I'm not sure what is going on with her carapace (to the right of her eyes); I'm guessing it happened when she molted.
  2. A Lucky Break (♂ Kukulcania hibernalis)

    A Lucky Break (♂ Kukulcania hibernalis)

    In the middle of the night, I felt this spider crawling on my forehead. Fortunately for him, I was sufficiently awake that I didn't reflexively squish him. I brushed him off, captured him, and released him near a female's web the next day.
  3. More goofy Kukulcania hibernalis babies

    More goofy Kukulcania hibernalis babies

    I could watch these guys all night. It’s like they don’t know how to use their own legs. Their baby awkwardness is delightful ♥️
  4. Kukulcania hibernalis spiderlings

    Kukulcania hibernalis spiderlings

    Look at my beautiful new spiderlings! They’re about the same size as my 2i Kochiana brunnipes tbh.
  5. Kukulcania hibernalis snacking while sac-sitting

    Kukulcania hibernalis snacking while sac-sitting

    She made this sac about two weeks ago and has been an amazing mom. She’s been very slim, though, so I offered her a mealworm and she’s casually snacking on it while guarding her sac. Such a good mama ♥️
  6. Vaska (Kukulcania hibernalis)

    Vaska (Kukulcania hibernalis)

    She was already mature when she crawled out from behind the washing machine six years ago.
  7. Living Dangerously (1.3" Mature Male Kukulcania hibernalis)

    Living Dangerously (1.3" Mature Male Kukulcania hibernalis)

    Two days ago, I extracted this freshly matured male from a roach bait tray. He'd been living there for months until he matured, undeterred by the poison. When the weather is nice, I will release him where there are lots of females.
  8. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [7/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [7/7]

    I gently placed her back in her web so she can recover. She is a fighter, and I hope she pulls through. (The leg at the end of her abdomen is from a previous molt.)
  9. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [6/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [6/7]

    Here she is after the surgery. She looks rough, and some of the legs may harden crooked, but she is very much alive.
  10. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [5/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [5/7]

    Eventually I had removed as much of the old abdomen as I could without tearing the delicate skin of the new abdomen. (I'm not sure, but there might still be trace amounts around the pedicel and book lungs.) Then I saw that one of her left legs was still encased in the old exoskeleton.
  11. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [4/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [4/7]

    Having removed the loose, easy sections, I could see that some of the abdomen appeared to be stuck around the book lungs and epigastric furrow. I continued using the water dropper to try to soften and separate.
  12. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [3/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [3/7]

    Next I turned my attention to the abdomen. She had made no progress extracting her abdomen save for a small opening near the sternum. I used the water dropper to fill the abdominal cavity with water and then backlit the area so I could separate the old abdomen from the new one.
  13. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [2/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [2/7]

    First I worked on the two right legs that were stuck near the knee joint. I used my dropper to insert water into the femur tube as lubricant and gently pulled to free the legs. The first leg was easier than the second.
  14. Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [1/7]

    Kukulcania hibernalis Molt Surgery [1/7]

    She-Ra, a mature female Kuk I've had for over 7 years, was hopelessly stuck in her molt. I wasn't confident that I could help her, because these spiders are so small and delicate when compared to tarantulas, and she had not even begun to extract her abdomen.
  15. Molting Kukulcania hibernalis

    Molting Kukulcania hibernalis

    "Sideways Sally" (she is called that, because she normally sits with her butt facing out of the retreat) has been living in my house for well over a year. She had one brood of spiderlings last fall, and now she's made a second egg sac.
  16. Kukulcania hibernalis

    Kukulcania hibernalis

  17. Sideways Sally

    Sideways Sally

    This Kuk lives in my house behind a vanity mirror. She's called "Sideways Sally," because she normally sits with her butt facing out of the retreat.
  18. Kukulcania hibernalis Spiderling (3.6 mm)

    Kukulcania hibernalis Spiderling (3.6 mm)

    This spiderling was crawling across the coaster on my computer desk. (The grid paper is 1 cm.)
  19. Juvenile Kukulcania hibernalis (8.4 mm) [2/2]

    Juvenile Kukulcania hibernalis (8.4 mm) [2/2]

    This Kuk was living in my kitchen between a shelf and its wall brace. I coaxed her out of her web in order to relocate her. (The grid paper is 1 cm.)
  20. Juvenile Kukulcania hibernalis (8.4 mm) [1/2]

    Juvenile Kukulcania hibernalis (8.4 mm) [1/2]

    This Kuk was living in my kitchen between a shelf and its wall brace. I coaxed her out of her web in order to relocate her. (The grid paper is 1 cm.)
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