Spider from Ecuador (Nature)
D

Spider from Ecuador (Nature)

I think it's an Pamphobeteus sp but i don't know wich specie and i will to know it. The picture was taken in the jungle at Mera, the Pastaza, close to tropical Andes.
Ho yes ! Really looks like Sericopelma rubronitens but the area is weird. Sericopelma rubronitens lives in Central America.
 
Ho yes ! Really looks like Sericopelma rubronitens but the area is weird. Sericopelma rubronitens lives in Central America.
i read they stretch from panama to nicaragua, which isnt too far from ecuador.
gl with finding the correct sp though
 
Panama and Ecuador are not geographically close. Not enough for a tarantula to have an undiscovered range, anyway. They are not masters of dispersal.

This is a mature male, and I would compare to Pamphobeteus petersi or perhaps Megaphobema velvetosoma. Peters notes in his description of P. petersi that specimens of the two species were mixed with one another, so they were difficult to distinguish (not mixed as in bred, but placed together as collected items of the same species).
 
Panama and Ecuador are not geographically close. Not enough for a tarantula to have an undiscovered range, anyway. They are not masters of dispersal.

This is a mature male, and I would compare to Pamphobeteus petersi or perhaps Megaphobema velvetosoma. Peters notes in his description of P. petersi that specimens of the two species were mixed with one another, so they were difficult to distinguish (not mixed as in bred, but placed together as collected items of the same species).
The carapace markings make me think velvetosoma.
 
It looks like a Sericopelma sp. to me. But there's a lot of look a like from this area. Looking forward to find out what species it really is.
 
@Damlon

Around Mera are some bigger Theraphosinae and maybe more than one Pamphobeteus sp. (1) (2) but none Sericopelma.
There is also a Pamphobeteus sp were the female is similar to the female that SCHMIDT has described as P. petersi.
But "P. petersi" is another mess from SCHMIDT.
Finally i would say your specimen is a adult male of a Pamphobeteus sp.

@Edan bandoot @dangerforceidle
If we talk about "P. petersi" we should not forget the description of P verdolaga.
 

Media information

Category
Tarantula Identification
Added by
Damlon
Date added
View count
180
Comment count
9
Rating
0.00 star(s) 0 ratings

Image metadata

Device
NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D5300
Aperture
ƒ/5.6
Focal length
90.0 mm
Exposure time
10/800
ISO
400
Flash
Auto, did not fire
Filename
cccccc (37).jpg
File size
284.5 KB
Date taken
Sat, 16 March 2019 11:20 PM
Dimensions
1000px x 666px

Share this media

Top