ID? pls.
No, It doesnt.
It looks like an Aphonopelma sp. "new river", or flagstaff orange, or something similar.
 
give a scientific name please, because that is just useless. give me a scientific name if you would like to contradict me. aphonopelma moderatums can easily com in a colour morph such as the given specimen.
 
aphonopelma clarki is the best one out of all the suggested options. it fits everything and looks exactly like one. for those who doubt me, google and be amazed
 
michaelcb said:
aphonopelma clarki is the best one out of all the suggested options. it fits everything and looks exactly like one. for those who doubt me, google and be amazed
I doubt you. ;) You should know that just because something looks similar doesn't mean they are the same. Pictures are worthless when trying to ID a spider. You should know this.. any experienced tarantula hobbyist would.

michaelcb said:
give a scientific name please, because that is just useless. give me a scientific name if you would like to contradict me. aphonopelma moderatums can easily com in a colour morph such as the given specimen.
You have not helped this situation any, at all. You have in fact stated nothing but jibberish. You have swung around a couple scientific names that you claim this species is, without any ironclad evidence, and yet you tell others they are wrong for what they have stated here? pfftttt.. Your guesses are no better.

Look, it's as simple as this - It occurs in the US. that means this is an Aphonopelma of some sort. That's the only genus that is -native- to the US. But species? you must look at the locality of this tarantula. It's useless to throw around species names. Even if you know the locality, that's only half the work.

So right now, it can only be called Aphonopelma sp. Until the poster of this picture tells us the location, that might be all we will ever know about this spider.
 
bliss said:
michaelcb said:
aphonopelma clarki is the best one out of all the suggested options. it fits everything and looks exactly like one. for those who doubt me, google and be amazed
I doubt you. ;) You should know that just because something looks similar doesn't mean they are the same. Pictures are worthless when trying to ID a spider. You should know this.. any experienced tarantula hobbyist would.

michaelcb said:
give a scientific name please, because that is just useless. give me a scientific name if you would like to contradict me. aphonopelma moderatums can easily com in a colour morph such as the given specimen.
You have not helped this situation any, at all. You have in fact stated nothing but jibberish. You have swung around a couple scientific names that you claim this species is, without any ironclad evidence, and yet you tell others they are wrong for what they have stated here? pfftttt.. Your guesses are no better.

Look, it's as simple as this - It occurs in the US. that means this is an Aphonopelma of some sort. That's the only genus that is -native- to the US. But species? you must look at the locality of this tarantula. It's useless to throw around species names. Even if you know the locality, that's only half the work.

So right now, it can only be called Aphonopelma sp. Until the poster of this picture tells us the location, that might be all we will ever know about this spider.
Agreed.
 

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