Don't let the bed bugs bite!
Atleast, the one upside to the the t being male, it actually moves i bet! :) I rarely see my aphonopelma move and its one of the only specimen i keep at my work desk all day next to me :cigar: the thing don't move
 
I agree with @macaridonte . Each one is different , just like each of us are different. My boys always out, day or night , doesn't matter . And he seems comfortable, he in and out of his hide, and the only renovating I've seen him do was clean out a little dirt from the borrow I made when I set up his enclosure. I guess I missed a spot :) . He has one little piece of cork bark , smaller than a ping pong ball , that is usually in a different spot each morning . Again, very active.
 
@REEFSPIDER I'd assume if she's on your work desk all day, that she only comes out at night when there's not so much going on around her . She's probably stressed, due to moving objects, shadows, vibration from your desk, etc . Idk I could be wrong but I've learned that spiders are pretty sensitive creatures when it comes to vibration . If I could feel everything around me through the tip of my toes, a highly trafficked desk would be the last place I would want to live .
 
@REEFSPIDER actually I'd probably say yes . Do some research. There's several threads on here about Ts not being able to see red light due to it being on a different wave length. I use a red flashlight to check on my inverts and watch a little of their activity at night. It's much better than a bright white light, and I do this very seldom . None of my inverts are under constant light, nor are they around constant traffic/activity like a work desk . I'm sure I'm not the only one that feels this way . In no way am I saying you're an idiot or causing harm to your pets , just giving my opinion as to why you don't see yours move . As I stated , mine are all very active, regardless of the red light.
 
Okay dude . I tried playing nice . You've been on AB since 2016, I've been here since November . You're wrong on the light thing plane and simple . It DOES still ultimately bowl down to individuality. I've never met you or seen the conditions your t is in. I'm not a scientist and did not claim to be giving scientific facts or expert advice on why your t doesn't move around and you never see it, not to mention that wasn't even the purpose of this thread. I simply gave you my opinion and tried to be informative to the best of my knowledge . That's what forums are for . If you don't agree with me or this thread , be a 26 year old adult and leave the conversation instead of acting like a child going back and forth with pointless, uneducated statements.

Thank you , have a nice evening .
 

Media information

Category
Aphonopelma
Added by
animaliaadvocate216
Date added
View count
348
Comment count
9
Rating
0.00 star(s) 0 ratings

Image metadata

Device
LG Electronics LGL84VL
Aperture
ƒ/2.2
Focal length
3.7 mm
Exposure time
0.108 s (1/9)
ISO
2200
Flash
Off, did not fire
Filename
0127190101_Burst01.jpg
File size
5.1 MB
Date taken
Sun, 27 January 2019 1:01 AM
Dimensions
4160px x 3120px

Share this media

Top