20220519_202304.jpg
T

20220519_202304.jpg

Grammastola Pulchra
It's the bit above the flap you pay attention to inbetween the flap n where the abdomen attaches to the carapace, males have a hollow arch above that flap, females have a bulging pouch, only works for nw sp though and even then some are more difficult than others to tell. I have no idea with ow sp still learning myself 😆
 
I did some reading but still cant figure out how people can tell. Could you explain to me? I see a little flap there, but idk what that means.
Yeah, absolutely - no problem. 👍

The little flap you're talking about is between the forward set of book lungs (the pale patches on either side of the T's 'belly') - it's actually a little slit or vent, and it's called the epigastric furrow. When trying to determine gender with this method, what you're really looking for are the epiandrous fusillae, which are a densely packed patch of specialized setae that male theraphosinae use when building a sperm web prior to mating. Usually these fusillae are accompanied by a dimple or crease in the center of the furrow, but not always. In this case, the epiandrous fusillae are easily seen - it's the little darker dot on the anterior (forward) lip of the furrow. This is not present in females, and female often have a bit of a puffed out appearance to that anterior lip of the furrow, due to the fact that they have the spermathecae and uterus externus inside underneath that lip.

I wish I was able to grab a screen shot and mark it up to illustrate this, but I can't. It is all a bit confusing and heavy with technical jargon, but once you see it a few times and figure out what you're looking for, it is actually fairly simple. Let me know if you have any questions or need more clarification!
 
Yeah, absolutely - no problem. 👍

The little flap you're talking about is between the forward set of book lungs (the pale patches on either side of the T's 'belly') - it's actually a little slit or vent, and it's called the epigastric furrow. When trying to determine gender with this method, what you're really looking for are the epiandrous fusillae, which are a densely packed patch of specialized setae that male theraphosinae use when building a sperm web prior to mating. Usually these fusillae are accompanied by a dimple or crease in the center of the furrow, but not always. In this case, the epiandrous fusillae are easily seen - it's the little darker dot on the anterior (forward) lip of the furrow. This is not present in females, and female often have a bit of a puffed out appearance to that anterior lip of the furrow, due to the fact that they have the spermathecae and uterus externus inside underneath that lip.

I wish I was able to grab a screen shot and mark it up to illustrate this, but I can't. It is all a bit confusing and heavy with technical jargon, but once you see it a few times and figure out what you're looking for, it is actually fairly simple. Let me know if you have any questions or need more clarification!
Thank you!! I see exactly what you mean now!
 

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Category
Epiandrous fusillae sexing (Not Molts)
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TwinkleToe
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samsung SM-N950U
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ƒ/1.7
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4.3 mm
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1/716
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50
Filename
20220519_202304.jpg
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Date taken
Thu, 19 May 2022 8:23 PM
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