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Your carnivorous plant pics

Discussion in 'Live Plants' started by Benurmanii, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. xFujimoto

    xFujimoto Arachnopeon

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    Ahh these are all gorgeous, I'd really love to have some CP someday.

    Are you able to obtain clippings easily to start new plants? I know my mom does this with a lot of her plants but she says some are easier to start new growth than others.
     
  2. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight

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    Hi,
    You can propagate most species via root cuttings, some can also be propagated via leaf cuttings. Quite a few will create lots of little plants over time and spread all over the pot. Then you get those that flower and set seed like crazy, such as D. Burmannii who if given time will spread like a weed and take over adjacent pots :wacky:
     
  3. Such awesome photos!
     
  4. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnopeon Active Member

    So it's been a while folks...

    I'll probably keep this thread for people who want to share their CP pics, but I'm gonna start a thread about my personal collection, so I can share unholy amounts of photos, and people can ask me questions about the plants that I grow without it getting too cluttered. Sorry to the people who asked questions previously on here, after I had taken a break from the forums.
     
  5. Yulian

    Yulian Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Heyyyy a fellow cp keeper! Ive kept cps for awhile now but stopped expanding my collection a few years back and have only kept a few species. I guess I'll take it upon myself to revive this thread XD I'll try to get some more pictures when I can as my tropical weather really favors the few nepenthes I have left!
    IMG_2843.JPG Frog fell into N.truncata Pasian variety pitcher
    View attachment 232666 N.distillatoria x rafflesiana I pollinated these myself it was a treat!
    image.jpg N.truncata pasian
     

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  6. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight

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    @Yulian That Nepenthes looks amazing! How do you grow it? Light, soil, water etc.
    For some reason, out of all the CP's I have grown I struggle with Neps:depressed: and they are suppose to some of the easier plants to grow..
     
  7. Yulian

    Yulian Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Well that really depends on the species. I moved all of my nepenthes outdoors because they got way too large to keep in my windowsill but this N. truncata struggled to stay alive outdoors here as I have very tropical weather year round and the sun was too much for it given that this is the highland variety. So I just moved it indoors and is currently doing very well as you can see the biggest pitcher so far is reaching the 10in mark. Its in a southeast window and gets supplemental lighting from a lamp with a simple fluorescent bulb(dont remember the watts but the more the better), for water I use rain water I collect or reverse osmosis and I'll put it outside if its raining, as you probably know already CPS need pure water so its very important to provide that. Potting soil is a mix of sphagnum with perlite and orchid bark(dont really keep track of how much) the soil doesnt really matter it just depends on how you keep your nepenthes although some aeriation of the soil is always good and should be provided. I dont feed any of my cps but as you can see the plants catch their own prey. This truncata has really suprised me and has naturally caught a few lizards(all I freed except one as it was already dead) and this frog(also dead before i could get it out) and has really started growing relatively fast from all this fertilizer I imagine. Remember Nepenthes are tropical plants and they really appreciate some extra humidity and heat, but that differs if for example you get an "easier" species like N.sanguinea which would do relatively well with home humidity. Now the opposite is true with low landers and ultra highlanders. Low land species like most I own (N.distillatoria, N. Rafflesiana) require high temperatures and high humidity to thrive while ultra highlanders require more humid temperatures and a sort of cooling during night temps. One tip to help keeping plants cool is potting them in plain live sphagnum moss. I recommend trying your luck with species that have requirements similar to your climate as I do and you'll have the most success. Also remember Nepenthes in general really need alot of sun to thrive and pitcher properly. Without it they will eventually decline and die. I could go on and on about their care but I'll suggest joining the flytrapcareforums( the forum of the flytrapstore) they are really friendly and discuss anything cp related and have some really experienced hobbysts there. Best of luck!
     
  8. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnopeon Active Member

    I give all of my Neps (intermediate to highland) days in the low 70s during winter and dropping into the mid to low 50s at night. Temps during the summer get closer to the 80s during the day, now that I upgraded to T5HOs it will probably be in the low 80s. Fortunately this means I'll get more of a temp drop than last summer, as the temps only drop to the mid to high 60s at night during the summer.
     
  9. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight

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    Awesome, thanks for the info guys.
    How is your watering schedule, do you let the plant dry out completely or do you let the media remains moist at all times?
     
  10. Yulian

    Yulian Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Never let Neps dry out completely, or any other carnivorous plants lol except maybe mexican pings during their dormancy and thats still kind of risky. For my Neps I usually wait for the surface of the soil to start to dry out before throughly watering again. Dont keep them too wet or with wet feet(water dish always on bottom) as that can lead to rot.
     
  11. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnopeon Active Member

    I let my Mexican Pinguicula dry out completely during their winter phase. In fact, some species that form underground bulbs, such as P. medusina and P. macrophylla, demand the soil be devoid of moisture. I've noticed that there is a lot of over-exaggeration about how they are super sensitive to moisture while in their succulent phase, too. I have multiple fully succulent P. calderoniae in a pot with a few ones in summer-mode, and the pot sits in water. Have not lost one, and they have been sitting this way for months.

    In regards to Neps, yes, you don't want to the soil to dry out completely. However, with my Neps that are not in my terrarium, I am bad about water, and the surface of the soil often gets fairly dry. They don't pitcher a lot for me, only holding one or two at a time, but I believe this is just due to the humidity being a bit lower than they were used to in their previous environment; they may still be adjusting.

    I actually water my non-terrarium Neps by pouring water in the dishes/trays they sit in until the pots stop absorbing water. Than I fill the dish to the point where it is full (only a cm or two). You can sit the Neps in water, as long as it is super high up the pot's level. Neps are happier with more oxygen getting to their roots, which is why it is advised against planting them in dense mixes, and sitting them in a lot of water.
     
  12. Yulian

    Yulian Arachnopeon Active Member

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    XD yea I pings arent my specialty. Also tuberous sundews can handle abit of a drought and actually need it in their yearly growth cycle if im not mistaken! I had a pot of D.dichotoma that dried up completely and the plants just withered away only to find them growing back from the roots when the pot was watered again it was really quite an experience. Note that any of the D.binata variations arent tuberous sundews tho.
     
  13. Benurmanii

    Benurmanii Arachnopeon Active Member

    I grow four species of tuberous Drosera, and some seeds I sowed super late seek to be germinating (will be power-feeding those). I also let those get pretty much completely dry during the summer. I give them a few drips of water on occasionally though, with not really any pattern. All of mine came out of dormancy fine, except the D. menziesii were very late, but they didn't go dormant until July.
     
  14. brolloks

    brolloks Arachnoknight

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    I have not grown any tuberous Drosera yet, but I will hopefully have some winter growning sundews soon. I sowed some cistiflora, cuneifolia, hilaris, and trinervia. Hopefully they will germinate for me once the temperatures start to drop in June/July.
    I am also waiting for my Drosophyllum seeds, so excited! I can't wait to start growing these. Will give them similar conditions as I give my Roridula and see how it goes. :shame: