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World's Largest???

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Carolina_wolfie, May 13, 2006.

  1. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

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    Hello, all.

    I have two questions:

    1.) What is the world's largest WOLF spider? I know that Hogna carolinensis is the largest wolf spider in North America. However, I want to know what the world's largest wolf spider is.

    2.) What is the world's largest TRUE spider?

    I hope somebody on this board knows the answers to these questions because I am very curious. I also want to possibly obtain these spiders if anyone has them available for sale.

    By the way, I am interested in the large hunting spiders (the ones which don't make webs and actively hunt for their prey).

    All replies are GREATLY APPRECIATED by me. Thanks again!

    Take care,
    Terry
     
  2. Stefan2209

    Stefan2209 Arachnolord Old Timer

    Hi there,

    1.) Hogna ingens

    2.) Heteropoda maxima

    Sorry, to shatter your dreams, but i´m afraid you won´t find any of these two out for sale: Hogna ingens is endemic to a small deserted island next to Madeira. This island is off-limits and controlled by armed forces. Only biologists who applied (and had been granted of course) for permit are allowed to set feet on that island for research purposes.

    H. maxima is just known since some years, it´s a cave-dwelling species from Laos. Many german hobbyists are very interested in this species, however, to my best knowledge nobody was ever able to get hold of some.

    Your best bet is to grab a H. carolinensis for your "wolf-spider delight" and to satisfy your taste of big and active hunting spiders, i´d advise to take a look into the ads here on the AB´s and search for Bridgebane´s offer.
    I´ve kept C. coccineus and can easily state that they make nice and easy to care for pets.

    Greetings from Germany,

    Stefan
     
  3. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Hello, Stefan.

    Thanks for answering my questions. You've been a great help to me.

    Here is another question for you:

    Exactly how dangerous is Cupiennius coccineus (Orange wandering spider) to humans?

    Please let me know. Thanks!

    Take care,
    Terry
     
  4. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Hello again, Stefan.

    Never mind. I was just reading one of your earlier posts in which you had said that this particular species is harmless to people. Well, that's good to know!

    Here are two more questions for you:

    1.) Is Cupiennius coccineus (Orange wandering spider) able to climb smooth surfaces?

    2.) Is it one of the LARGEST, safe wandering spiders which is offered for sale in the hobby?

    I am looking forward to your reply.

    Take care,
    Terry
     
  5. Stefan2209

    Stefan2209 Arachnolord Old Timer

    Hi Terry,

    1.) Yes, absolutely. They are excellent climbers and are lightning-quick, but not aggressive.

    2.) That´s a bit difficult to answer for me, as i´m located in europe and i don´t know exactly which species are offered right now in the US. So let´s try it this way: in europe they belong not to the biggest hunting-spiders offered, they´re in the medium size range.
    Cupiennius salei grows bigger, Phoneutria´s of course (beware, toxic!) and Ancylometes spec.´s.
    To my knowledge Ancylometes are very hard to get in the US, Phoneutria are kept by a few hobbyists, but i wouldn´t recommend those to you, as long as you have not plenty experience with other hunters, as they can react very aggressive and are very toxic. I once saw pics of C. salei from a US-hobbyist, so this might be an alternative species if you manage to grab them. I´ve kept both and like the C. salei´s better, but this is pure personal taste. By behaviour they´re very similar if not the same at all. The C. salei´s grow a tad bigger, but not that much. So it depends most which colouration you like better and which species is easier to get hold of i guess.

    Feel free to ask, if you have any questions open.

    Greetings,

    Stefan
     
  6. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Hello, Stefan.

    WOW!!! Your replies are really helping me a lot!

    1.) What is the difference in coloration between C. coccineus and C. salei. Also, does C. salei have any bright colors like C. coccineus has or is its entire body a drab color? Do you have any photos of the adults of both species so I can compare the two?

    2.) Can I keep these two species in a similiar way like I would for a terrestrial tarantula or do they absolutely require a tall enclosure? The reason why I am asking is because I don't have any tall tanks.

    3.) Do both species relish cockroaches? The reason why I am asking is because I have a thriving colony of giant tropical cockroaches (Giant Cave Roaches and Giant Peppered Roaches). I need to do something with my surplus roaches. I don't have crickets or anything else to feed the spiders. In my opinion, roaches are much easier to breed and raise than crickets! Plus, the giant cockroaches make for very impressive and fascinating display animals.

    4.) What size prey do both species of spiders tackle?

    5.) Do both species need something to hide in or do they normally stay out in the open?

    6.) Can I just place water dishes in their tanks or is this not enough as far as humidity is concerned? I live in a place which is fairly humid anyway.

    7.) How long do both species live? What are their lifespans?

    Well, that's all the questions which I have for you now. I will ask you more questions as they come to me.

    Thanks again for all your help, Stefan!

    Take care,
    Terry
     
  7. Stefan2209

    Stefan2209 Arachnolord Old Timer

    Hi Terry,

    1.) Sorry i´ve got no pics of C. salei, as i got my cam my female was unfortunately already dead.
    I´ve got some pics of my former C. coccineus male somewhere, gotta dig them out...
    Till i have them, i´d advise to take a search through the boards, both species had been shown here before.
    They are not too similar in colour, as the name is already saying it, C. coccineus is of an orange-yellow-golden colour.
    C. salei shows a mix of different colours from orange over red till some dark stripes...

    2.) Don´t mind, they prefer high places, but that´s just as high as high gets. I´ve kept some of mine in cube-style enclosures, with no problems at all.

    3.) Sure, they take roaches, just watch the size of the roaches. I feed nearly all my hunting-spiders with roaches, no probs.

    4.) That´s a much more important question: they eat nearly everything they can overpower, dending on their growth-stage, of course. Adults take down a big variety of prey, starting with adult crickets, over bugs, roaches (i used to feed adult S. tartara) and nearly everything else.
    My slings often attacked and took down prey items that was nearly twice as big, as themselfes.
    On the net some pics can be found that show such spiders devouring even small lizards, tadpoles and frogs...

    5.) My specimen had both a curved piece of bark, to hide behind. However, they didn´t use it very often.

    6.) Waterdish is quite useful. Both species will live and thrive with humidity levels around 70 - 80%, but will tolerate some fluctuations.

    7.) From sling to adulthood and natural death it´s about 2 - 2,5 years for females and 1 - 1,5 years for males.

    My pleasure to help out.

    Have a nice sunday.

    Greetings from germany,

    Stefan
     
  8. Ganoderma

    Ganoderma Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Have you considered orb weavers at all? or really just want hunters? there are soem pretty large and spectacular nephila and argriopes around. somewhat easy to obtain i would think.

    i have posted this before but this is a nephila pilipes. very large and quite attractive! I am trying to figure out a good cage to display one of these in now. a wall sized picture frame spider, that would be interesting.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Actually, I am interested in two species of large orb weavers which are native here in the states. One species is Argiope aurantia (the Black-and-yellow Argiope)... which is my favorite orb weaver. The other species is Nephila clavipes (the Golden-silk Spider)... which is closely related to the orb weaver in your photo. I've heard that you can place the spiders of both genera on windows inside your home and they will spin their webs and stay in those locations. Then you can toss grasshoppers or other insect prey in their webs. So, you really don't need to buy special enclosures for them. I think spiders of the genus Argiope prefer a sunny spot and spiders of the genus Nephila prefer the shade (or dappled sunlight).

    The large hunting spiders are my favorites though.

    Take care,
    Terry
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2006
  10. Ganoderma

    Ganoderma Arachnobaron Old Timer

    ahh cool. you have clavipes? i alsways thought they were restricted to asia, indonesia on down to aus??

    definatl cool spiders, i'm not sure about that windo thing though....they will choose what they choose i guess. im in a school so i wouldnt want one of those to choose the classroom one day :D

    what kind of sizes do you want fo rhunting? or is strange and small ok?
     
  11. T.Raab

    T.Raab Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Hello,

    I'm sure Peter Jäger kept or even already keeps H. maxima.

    BTW: He described this species in 2001.

    Reference:
    • JAEGER, P. (2001a). A new species of Heteropoda (Araneae, Sparassidae, Heteropodinae) from Laos, the largest huntsman spider? Zoosystema 23: 461-465. (click me for description [PDF])
     
  12. Randolph XX()

    Randolph XX() Arachnoprince Old Timer

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  13. Stefan2209

    Stefan2209 Arachnolord Old Timer

    Hi Timo,

    yeah, i had contact to Peter at the end of last year, guess he still has some specimen at hand.

    Furthermore, as far as i know he had been back to Laos in march this year....

    However, would be new to me that he has supplied some private keepers with this species. Do you know more?

    Greetings,

    Stefan
     
  14. Steven

    Steven pede-a-holic Old Timer

    somewhere i've seem to remember the wellknown herr Vinman was on the search for males H.maxima last year,... maybe he has/had females ? :?
     
  15. T.Raab

    T.Raab Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Hi Stefan,

    yes, Peter is already back from Laos since few weeks. (BTW: He broke his leg there.)
    I dont know if he supplied H. maxima to private keepers, but you said:
    "... to my best knowledge nobody was ever able to get hold of some."

    BTW: I'm still waiting for the picture (you know what i mean). ;)
     
  16. Cheshire

    Cheshire Arachnoking Old Timer

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    Gano: Do you have slings for that spider?

    That thing would be a hit in the US hobby!
     
  17. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Yep, we have N. clavipes here in the USA. It is a tropical/sub-tropical species which occurs in the warmer, southern states in this country such as Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, etc...

    I want the LARGEST hunting spiders which I can possibly obtain (3 to 4 inch legspan minimum). We do have a few species of large hunting spiders here in the states which can reach 3 to 4 inches such as Hogna carolinensis, Dolomedes tenebrosus, etc...

    Take care,
    Terry
     
  18. Randolph XX()

    Randolph XX() Arachnoprince Old Timer

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  19. Carolina_wolfie

    Carolina_wolfie Arachnosquire Old Timer

    Hello, Randolph.

    Yeah, I already know what it is. I was answering Ganoderma's (His name is Kyle?) question when he was asking me if I had N. clavipes here in the USA. Thanks for letting me know though. By the way, those are nice photos!

    Take care,
    Terry
     
  20. Ganoderma

    Ganoderma Arachnobaron Old Timer

    yes i am kyle :)


    i KNEW they could catch birds!!!!! hikers too i bet! great pic :)