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What was the hardest lesson to learn?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Caseyface, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. Caseyface

    Caseyface Arachnosquire

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    This speaks to me.
    Sometimes I worry that I am *too* obsessed with my Ts. Is it normal to pause movies just to go look at them? Maybe... Maybe.
     
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  2. Trenor

    Trenor Arachnoprince Active Member

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    If you don't have a dubia nymph the right size you can always cut one to the needed size. Small slings will scavenge for food easily. I have 6 small Cyriopagopus sp. hati hati slings and I usually use one dubia to feed them all.

    It is. I've often been walking by the T room and randomly dropped in to see who was out. I do this a lot in the evening. There is a difference between watching them and messing with them so they come out to where you can see them.

    I have a nice red led flashlight so I can sneak in at night and see what they are up to without them knowing. :)
     
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  3. Caseyface

    Caseyface Arachnosquire

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    The enclosures add up so fast. In my excitement and classic over-preparedness, I purchased all the enclosures my Ts may need from sling to adult. Yeah...that hurt my wallet. But they are so prettyyyy?
     
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  4. Caseyface

    Caseyface Arachnosquire

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    This...I am still learning.

    I don't mess with them. I try not to even breathe too hard. I'm just very curious and they bring me a lot of enjoyment. Same with you, this happens much more often at night, when the Ts are usually out and about. :D

    EDIT: I forgot to mention: even the smallest of the small dubia nymphs I have are far too large for my e. sp. red sling. It either gets a leg, or piece of freshly chopped dubia. (yummmmm).
     
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  5. GingerC

    GingerC Arachnosquire Active Member

    same reaction any time someone has PMS
     
  6. Magenta

    Magenta Arachnosquire

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    I do that! My husband knows to just go play some video games or something if I go into my T room. Even if I say I'll only be a sec, it easily turns into 30min of me just staring at them. LOL:p
     
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  7. Caseyface

    Caseyface Arachnosquire

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    I'm glad that I am not alone in this! Time doesn't seem to travel at the same speed in my T room. :rolleyes:
     
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  8. Thaneem

    Thaneem Arachnopeon

    What I found is that if I used a shallow, ceramic water dish and let some water overflow, I had a very moist area directly under the dish. But yeah, otherwise the substrate was bone-dry. I had a Haitian giant lay eggs and nearly all babies survived. I had no mold, no mites. Nothing. I've kept subspinipes this way too. All of my centipedes. Pure peat moss, dry, overflow from the dish and occasional misting.
     
  9. Thaneem

    Thaneem Arachnopeon

    Honestly, dry substrate w/overflow solved all of my problems. If you can keep it moist and avoid mites (which was my biggest issue), cool.
     
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  10. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    what ever works. :)
    ive found peat moss to be really good with preventing mold, which in turn prevents mites.
     
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  11. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Well, a good ventilation, and spot on cleaning, always helps to prevent molt and else. But what's important IMO is considering where someone live. My 'bone dry' is different from EulersK 'bone dry', since he lives in a desert environment, for tha matter. Same if someone lives in a tropical nation.

    Granted, a nice sized water dish always helps, and while substrate should be moist (if needed for certain species) and never wet, and that exaggerating with water isn't advised, still I fail to realize how it's possible to keep an 'Haplo' (example) on bone dry substrate, man :stop:
     
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  12. crone

    crone Arachnodemon Active Member

    So THAT'S how you got that face on your avatar....
     
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  13. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    I've watched all of mine eat esp at the 1/4"
    Size to make sure they are eating, and to k serve their behavior.
    It's very different than any other T I've seen re prey capture.

    I get a single bolus. I haven't observed partial eating.
     
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  14. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Arachnolord Arachnosupporter

    My slings are all burrowing so it is kind of hard to catch them eating. My crickets are usually over-sized as well so I have to break them up in pieces. I usually spread the pieces out over a 1/2" distance to insure the T finds the food.

    But I have seen the adults eat plenty and they definitely eat the whole cricket.
     
  15. Thaneem

    Thaneem Arachnopeon

    Sure. At the same time, bone dry substrate doesn’t necessarily = low humidity. I’m not saying I kept centipedes in low humidity environments. I’m saying only that I found other ways to increase the humidity without moistening the substrate (save for under the water dish). Seriously – I never had any issues with any of my spiders or centipedes doing this, but had constant issues with centipedes prior to doing this. Granted, it could’ve amounted to me way overdoing the moistening. Idk.

    I live in a tropical area now, but I’m from New England. Summers are humid, but during the winter we crank up the heat and it dries the air horribly. Even in those situations, I had zero problems with my animals on essentially bone dry substrate. Maybe it’s not for everyone, but it’s worked for me.
     
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  16. grayzone

    grayzone Arachnoking

    Hardest lesson i learned was when it came to the breeding aspect.
    I learned to just let nature take its course and let the mom tend to the sack. I got way to anxious on a few of my first breeding attempts and pulled the sacks, only for them to go to waste during the incubation process.

    It is way easier to lure the angry mother into a catchcup (once the slings hatch) than it is to attempt to play god
     
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  17. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    That's nice...living in a naturally humid area has its advantages;) In the winter its exceedingly dry here, so I need to add large amounts of water to the substrate on a regular basis.

    And that's actually a tough lesson to learn;) Understanding that what works for some in one area, won't always work or will need adjustments in other areas or even during other seasons.
     
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  18. Thaneem

    Thaneem Arachnopeon

    Oh absolutely. Maybe I'm on the verge of learning something new, though.
    For me, moist substrate was an issue almost solely because of mites which were introduced into the enclosures with feeder crickets. This was a constant issue, so much so that I’m not understanding why those of you using moist substrate aren’t experiencing it constantly.

    My question becomes: what was I doing wrong/what are you all doing right?
     
  19. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Arachnolord Arachnosupporter

    Were the mites with your crickets or did they show up after you placed them in the enclosures?
     
  20. Thaneem

    Thaneem Arachnopeon

    Well my assumption was that they were on the crickets. It was only crickets, too. Never had any mite issues when I fed out hissing roaches. Moist substrate + crickets = mites for me, almost always. And this wasn’t over the course of a month, either. It was years, with probably 50 some odd inverts and crickets bought from many different stores.

    Why/how would mites show up after crickets were placed in the enclosure unless they were on the crickets to begin with?