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What is this?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by bee67, May 25, 2010.

  1. bee67

    bee67 Arachnosquire

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    Poop?
    Fungus?
    Larva of some kind?

    Found in my a. avic's enclosure- brand new, just bought her and set it all up on Saturday.
    The plant it's on is a fabric with a waxy/plastic coating. Fake plant from the dollar store, you know.
    Each "pellet" of that stuff is about 3mm long.

    I would say "poo" but it looks nothing like my g. rosea's poopoo pellets, which are more like birds'- white and liquidy. And stuck to the glass.

    Should I clean it off, if it is poo? Would that mould?


    ... my posts always end up being longer than I intend them to be.
     
  2. JC

    JC Arachnoprince

    Their poop does not mold. I'm not too sure what that is though. Color seems a bit off if it were poop.
     
  3. xhexdx

    xhexdx ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Wait...tarantula crap doesn't mold? :?

    Where'd you hear that?
     
  4. thedude

    thedude Arachnoprince Old Timer

    kind of looks like eggs or pupa to me
     
  5. JC

    JC Arachnoprince

    Well I'm sure they mold to some degree(perhaps a microscopic level), but I've never seen mold on poop even in the best mold growing conditions, have you?
     
  6. xhexdx

    xhexdx ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Just because you've never seen it doesn't mean mold doesn't grow on it.

    No, I haven't specifically seen mold growing on crap, but I don't exactly let my cages get moldy, either. I was just curious if you read something somewhere or if you were saying something perceived as fact based on personal experience.

    You've put crap in "the best mold growing conditions" and it didn't mold?
     
  7. OxDionysus

    OxDionysus Arachnobaron

    I have had poo mold before, and have had their poo dry up and turn brown/tanish also
     
  8. me too... i think thats poop on the pic
     
  9. Travis K

    Travis K TravIsGinger Old Timer

    looks like projectile avic poop to me.
     
  10. JC

    JC Arachnoprince

    Yup, I still have it in there actually. :}

    So far 20 days and counting, part of it is even touching the substrate, humidity 90% and very low ventilation .
     
  11. JC

    JC Arachnoprince

    What color was it before it turned brown?
     
  12. xhexdx

    xhexdx ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Pictures ?
     
  13. JC

    JC Arachnoprince

    You want to see un-molded clear-white tarantula poop? lol. I guess I can take a few snaps.
     
  14. AbraCadaver

    AbraCadaver Arachnoknight

    That looks nothing like the poop my babies send after me.. =/ I really have no idea what it could be, but I don't think it's poop.. Regardless, I'd just remove it..
     
  15. xhexdx

    xhexdx ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Well, if it's in optimal molding conditions, that means there would be mold everywhere else, right?

    I'm curious to see a picture of poop in the middle of a mold-field, yes.
     
  16. xhexdx

    xhexdx ArachnoGod Old Timer

    It's poop. ;)
     
  17. AbraCadaver

    AbraCadaver Arachnoknight

    The word poop is making me giggle.. How sad is that..

    Well, I stand corrected then.. But it still doesn't look like the stuff that comes out of my T's =p
     
  18. xhexdx

    xhexdx ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Not all (poop poop poop ;)) is created equal.

    Not to mention it also would depend on what the spider is eating. If you're feeding yours crickets and they're feeding theirs roaches, I bet the (poop poop poop ;)) will have some slightly different characteristics.
     
  19. AbraCadaver

    AbraCadaver Arachnoknight

    Hahaha XD I feel so mature..
     
  20. JC

    JC Arachnoprince


    No actually I am preventing mold from growing all over the place with the aid of peat moss. Peat moss is significantly acidic, its levels reach a pH of 3.5 to 4.0. The purpose of the experiment is to isolate the theraphosid's waste from anything else that is growing in the substrate and observe if the waste itself attracts the fungi. The peat moss is only their to hold in humidity. I've also allowed some of it touch the waste to see what happens.