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What is compatible with green tree frog?

Discussion in 'Not So Spineless Wonders' started by XxSpiderQueenxX, Mar 12, 2019.

Should I keep a crestie with a Green tree frog

  1. Yes

    9.1%
  2. No

    45.5%
  3. NO NEVEREVER

    45.5%
  4. Yes I hv kept them together and it was good!

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. I hv kept them together it turned out bad

    0 vote(s)
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  6. YES YES YES THEY ARE BEST TANK MATES :)

    0 vote(s)
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  1. XxSpiderQueenxX

    XxSpiderQueenxX Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Hello everyone! I have a green tree frog tadpole, and I wanted to know if when he grows up, he can be kept with something else? e.g. crested gecko, anole
    People have kept them with cresties and anoles without problems, I'm probably keeping it with a crestie. You can also check out my other thread: crested gecko+ green tree frog
    Thank you for any help!




    2 cockatiels
    3 tarantulas
    2 vampire crabs
    1 red devil crab
    1 panther crab
    2 Thai Micro crabs
    2 hissing cockroaches
    1 yellow porcelain roach nymph
    1 centurion roach nymph
    a flock of zebra finches
    1 green tree frog tadpole
    3 African dwarf frogs
    6 and more fry guppies
    4 Mexican wild color dwarf crayfish (NOT wild caught)
    1 Orange Dwarf Crayfish
    1 angelfish
    a whole ton of more fish
    1 soil centipede
    10 mealworms for turning into darkling beetles for selling/ keeping as pets
    1 delta betta fish
     
  2. Salmonsaladsandwich

    Salmonsaladsandwich Arachnobaron Active Member

    Do you mean an american green treefrog (Hyla cinerea?)

    Many people will say that no herps should ever be species- mixed in a single enclosure. I think there are situations where it can be pulled off (keeping small geckos with dart frogs, mixing some similar-sized frogs and toad species from the same region), but long- term, this definitely isn't a safe one. Cresties (especially specimens that have only eaten powdered food) don't seem to be particularly voracious hunters, but we're talking about a lizard that can grow to 9", has a huge head and could swallow an adult green treefrog if it wanted.

    If you mean an australian/whites green treefrog, i would be worried about the opposite: the frog biting off and eating the gecko's tail, stressing it out by lunging at it whenever it moves, etc. Also, i believe they have temperature requirements that are higher than what is ideal for cresteds.
     
  3. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnosquire Active Member

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    I wouldn't recommend a crested gecko as it's generally not advised to mix species from different areas of the world, especially with such large size difference. If you're heart is set on a mixed species vivarium with a green tree frog, it can be done. I remember my aunt had a large, planted paludarium (120g) in her living room with American green tree frogs, Cuban frogs, brown and green anoles, hermit crabs, newts, and a red eyed tree frog (this one was a rescue). It held my fascination longer than anything that was on the TV when I was growing up.

    Thanks,
    --Matt
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. XxSpiderQueenxX

    XxSpiderQueenxX Arachnosquire Active Member

    Yes, I mean American green tree frog!
     
  5. XxSpiderQueenxX

    XxSpiderQueenxX Arachnosquire Active Member

    So I'm not going to do the crestie, and my tank is 12 x 12 x 18 (If I had the crestie I would move them both to a bigger tank later). What could be kept with a GTF in there?
     
  6. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Anything I listed, but with something that small, I wouldn't put more than two other animals in it. Maybe a pair of anoles and the frog, or three frogs.

    Thanks,
    --Matt
     
  7. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    If you mean Cuban tree frog, I'd be careful with those. They get big, they have a big head, and they're voracious little buggers. I could easily see them trying to eat the green tree frog.
     
  8. Salmonsaladsandwich

    Salmonsaladsandwich Arachnobaron Active Member

    I would be cautious of newts, as they all have very powerful skin toxins and could possibly poison the frog, and hermit crabs should have a bowl of saltwater which is not something that ought to be in an amphibian enclosure. Also, I can easily see a hermit crab grabbing and eating a frog. It might not have happened in a 120 gallon puludarium where the frogs could easily avoid the crabs but a smaller enclosure is a different story.

    I would reccommend a gray treefrog, fowler's or american toad (toads are lots of fun), or a mole salamander- marbled, spotted, bluespotted etc. (I kept a spotted salamander with a gray treefrog for years before eventually separating them). Obviously never house amphibians with significant size differences. I would say that a salamander whose head is the same size or larger than a frog's head is too large to house with said frog.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Good point. Dont know if that ever happened in her tank, she fed daily and I doubt she counted the frogs daily as well. Mostly, everything was the same size.

    Thanks,
    --Matt
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnosquire Active Member

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    The water feature was filtered and over 20g, pretty sure the toxins were a moot point and I think she provided salt water in a sponge, but I cant remember as this was over 23 years ago. Obviously, OP's situation is way different. Guess I should have dug a little deeper before making the suggestion, that's my fault.

    Thanks,
    --Matt
     
  11. XxSpiderQueenxX

    XxSpiderQueenxX Arachnosquire Active Member

    Hello! All good suggestions! In a 12x12x18, is that too small with too little floor space for a American Toad? If it is, I'm probably going with the anole! :) (Do they have to be in pairs? I feel it is too small... they are 8 inches snout to tail tip!)
     
  12. Ajohnson5263

    Ajohnson5263 Arachnosquire

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    while I think that is enough space for an American toad, I wouldn't underestimate the size of their potential prey, I've seen some fairly large American toads, and I know if hungry they could take on a tree frog. so always be aware of the risk. for anoles, there doesn't seem to be a risk of either eating the other, but you always have to watch for possible transfer of disease and/or parasites. my personal recommendation would be a grey tree frog. they are cheap, easy to care for, live in the same habitat, and have near identical care to green tree frogs. otherwise, maybe try some inverts? I imagine that isopods or maybe ivory millipedes might to well with an ideal substrate.
     
  13. Dry Desert

    Dry Desert Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Grey tree frogs or Red Eyed tree frogs only. If you introduce inverts or small reptiles what is disease resistance for one maybe fatal to another if you are unfortunate to unintentionally introduce a virus of some kind.