1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Velvet Worm Vivarium - Epiperipatus barbadensis

Discussion in 'Insects, Other Invertebrates & Arthropods' started by AbraxasComplex, May 11, 2017.

  1. Hisserdude

    Hisserdude Arachnoprince Active Member

    Advertisement
    Wow, learning so much here! I knew they were fragile, but had no idea how sensitive they could be to such minor problems.

    I know fully well that it will probably take @AbraxasComplex several years to fully establish his colony, let alone have enough to start selling them, if he can even get them to do well in culture at all, I was just asking for him to keep me in mind if/when he ever has any available in the future, probably far into the future. :)

    Really hope you are successful keeping and breeding these cuties @AbraxasComplex, and I hope you are able to get a stable culture of your species going @wizentrop! Will definitely be following this thread closely! Already know a LOT more than I previously did about these critters thanks to the information posted by you two! :D
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  2. Staehilomyces

    Staehilomyces Arachnobaron Active Member

    To think that these delicate creatures have survived hundreds of millions of years, and endured multiple mass extinctions, is truly astounding.
     
  3. VolkswagenBug

    VolkswagenBug Arachnosquire Active Member

    109
    10
    18
    Utah
    Yeah, it's been super informative. There really isn't much information about them.
    I think I might try my hand at some planarians or some other kind of worm, because this post has gotten me interested in the non-arthropod inverts out there. I've always liked tiger flatworms, but don't know about too many species of worm.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  4. Tleilaxu

    Tleilaxu Arachnoprince Old Timer

    After reading this, wouldn't it be wise for @AbraxasComplex to buy some more "worms" and try them in larger more sterile containers as suggested, for more stable humidity and other factors?

    I have no idea how financially viable that would be, but certainly moving the ones he has now seems like it's not an option.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. AbraxasComplex

    AbraxasComplex Arachnoprince Active Member

    Currently mine are in very basic containers where humidity is controlled quite well with limited ventilation. The leaves, cork bark, and substrate were sterilized beforehand. The springtails I added could potentially introduce mold, but have done a decent job of reducing it. Plus any sterile environment would have been compromised the moment I fed them a feeder item. Currently the one group that is on the same substrate as the main terrarium will eventually be slowly transferred over to the terrarium a few individuals at a time. The group in the more basic container will remain as a control and back up. As for ordering them in that is not a financially viable option unless people would like to crowd fund me a couple thousand.
     
  6. Hisserdude

    Hisserdude Arachnoprince Active Member

    Which springtail species are you using...? Please tell me it's just the little silver ones, and not the crazy prolific, bound to stress your VWs out Sinella curviseta?
     
  7. AbraxasComplex

    AbraxasComplex Arachnoprince Active Member

    I introduced tiny silver and tropical white. The tropical white quickly disappeared. Not sure if they are in the substrate or were eaten. I do have the pink you mentioned, but those are only in the main terrarium and not in large numbers since the conditions are more ideal for the tropical and the silver.
     
  8. Hisserdude

    Hisserdude Arachnoprince Active Member

    Crap, well if there is enough food, lots of crevices, and a decent amount of bark in the main terrarium, their population will EXPLODE, they do well under a wide variety of conditions, and are very prolific, so prolific I've had to sterilize certain roach enclosures a couple times since they can stress them out due to constant tactile contact. In some setups I'd prefer it if mites were the dominant micro-fauna rather than the Sinella! :(

    Don't get me wrong, they do make pretty good cleanup crews for many invertebrates, but for small, slow breeding/growing, fragile invertebrates, like certain roaches and possibly velvet worms, they can be real pests.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. AbraxasComplex

    AbraxasComplex Arachnoprince Active Member

    Well they've been in the terrarium for 6 months with no problems yet. That may change with the addition of food and waste from the peripatus.
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 2
  10. Hisserdude

    Hisserdude Arachnoprince Active Member

    Yeah, with no added protein, they don't seem to reproduce nearly as much, don't know if dead bodies will get their numbers on the rise, but dog food certainly does!
     
  11. AbraxasComplex

    AbraxasComplex Arachnoprince Active Member

    Well I just checked and looked under branches and dead leaves. Absolutely no pinks, just tropical whites in the more humid areas and a whole lot of tiny silver ones. So I guess they won't be an issue. I won't add any other springtails in the future for their terrarium just in case.
     
  12. Hisserdude

    Hisserdude Arachnoprince Active Member

    Alright, sounds pretty good then, hopefully the tropical whites won't pose a problem either, the tiny silvers are very un-intrusive, and probably won't stress your VWs at all. :)
     
  13. Tleilaxu

    Tleilaxu Arachnoprince Old Timer

    @Elytra and Antenna
    @wizentrop

    I'm tagging and quoting this post due to the reference to keeping schizomids, something I saw mentioned in Orin's book on vinegaroons. If he still visits this site he may find this interesting.


    On a more on topic note, I think a thread with pics, along with husbandry information on schizomids maybe useful, and considering the posters positive experience with them for highly sensitive inverts maybe it behooves us to get them circulating into the hobby as well.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017 at 4:43 PM
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. ShrapnelShark

    ShrapnelShark Arachnopeon

    Ah! I've always wanted to hold a Velvet worm! Seeing this has reignited that need XD <3 Really awesome.
     
  15. VolkswagenBug

    VolkswagenBug Arachnosquire Active Member

    109
    10
    18
    Utah
    That's not a good idea, due to their very sensitive skin. It will likely kill the handled velvet worm or at least severely injure it if you are not handling in a completely sterile environment with sterile gloves on, and even then they could be injured.
     
  16. Elytra and Antenna

    Elytra and Antenna Arachnoking Old Timer

    2,104
    193
    828
    USA
    I had a species from New Zealand maybe 20 years ago but I didn't realize how difficult they are to contain or I would have used a totally different enclosure.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. ShrapnelShark

    ShrapnelShark Arachnopeon

    Dang i had no clue,then again this was a love for them when i was a little kid,i ain't no small child grabbing my bugs now xD
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. AbraxasComplex

    AbraxasComplex Arachnoprince Active Member

    Quick update. A few days ago I placed 3 of the adults in the terrarium. Two have decided to set up a burrow right against the glass. They actually don't create burrows, but the soil had created a pocket and my soil mix is full of pocket producing items. Thankfully they took advantage of a spot I could view them. I also saw one wandering around at 4am when an ambulance woke me up. So they seem to be settling in.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 2
  19. Xafron

    Xafron Arachnosquire Active Member

    Glad they seem to be adapting to the enclosure so far. Any idea how quickly or slowly these guys reproduce?

    Have you managed to get more photos/video of them?
     
  20. Hisserdude

    Hisserdude Arachnoprince Active Member

    Nice, glad they seem to like it so far! Let's hope they continue to do well in there!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3