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Tarantulas accepting small / big feeders

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Bluelight, Oct 9, 2018.

  1. Bluelight

    Bluelight Arachnopeon

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    I have seen it mentioned that some only accepts small feeders.
    Is there some system behind what species which accepts only small feeders, or is there just individual differences from spider to spider?
     
  2. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoprince Active Member

    More of an individual specimen thing.
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
  3. johnny quango

    johnny quango Arachnoknight Arachnosupporter

    @Bluelight just as @Nightstalker47 has stated it's generally an individual. I have an adult female Euathlus so red and she will not nor as she ever taken adult crickets or large locust, but my G grossa and iheringi will gladly take full size crickets despite being around the same size as my E so red.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    While it certainly can boil down to individuals, I've definitely noticed that species does play a role. The more voracious eaters (A. geniculata, C. argentinense, N. incei, P. cancerides, etc) tend to happily accept prey larger than themselves. Makes fattening them up much easier! Meanwhile, the more docile eaters (G. sp. "Concepcion", M. balfouri, B. cabocla, A. chalcodes, etc) are much more hesitant to take large prey. Just my personal experience.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    My 7" regalis chased down a 1/2" (at best) moth and ate it.
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    My baboon species seem to have no problem tackling huge prey, but our LP juvie has to have prey that I consider way too small - He will literally pounce on one before it hits the ground if it is small, but just a tiny bit larger and he'll run from it (even with the head crushed).

    I really want to try moths with my arboreals! I keep reading that they go nuts over them.
     
  7. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Nothing in the spider world hits harder than an adult pokie chasing down a moth. Jumping, high speed chases, it has it all.
     
  8. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoking Active Member

    From my limited experience with slings I've always found them to be fearless with regards to feeding. The equivalent meal for an adult would be a cat.
     
  9. aphono

    aphono Arachnoknight Active Member

    Try it with terrestrials too. All of my Aphonopelmas go uncharacteristically nuts over moths. For everything else they're mostly calm. But with moths, they go all out in a frenzy trying to catch them. Haven't tried moths with other species but will try when there's extras left over after the arboreals and Aphonopelmas.
     
  10. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    Definitely going to try it with my P. met when she is ready to eat after her molt! Are wild caught moths the acceptable wild caught prey to use?

    I totally will!
     
  11. aphono

    aphono Arachnoknight Active Member

    Let us know how that goes! :) I was quite pleasantly surprised at the Aphonopelma reactions, did not expect them to get that excited. Wondering if moths are an important part of their diet in the wild?

    I use waxworm adults. Too afraid to try wild moths- too much unknowns as for parasites or exposure to insecticides. Curious about which moths others are using too...
     
  12. Ultum4Spiderz

    Ultum4Spiderz Arachnoking Active Member

    Species isn’t always an indicator it’s true that most have a big appetite, even some slow growers do. I see g rosea catches & eats adult roaches no problems.
    I’ve seen 2.4-3” m Ts eat a full grown male dubia.
    My h Mac is only picky one , p Miranda do not seem to eat a lot either for a pokie.
     
  13. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Haha.. don't think anyone but me will say yes. That's what I use.

    Interesting note, I've fed many spiders moths considered poisonous. No issues.
     
  14. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    I live on acreage that doesn't use any sort of pesticides, so I am really not overly worried about wild caught prey. We'll catch some moths tonight! :D
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. WildSpider

    WildSpider Arachnobaron Active Member

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