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Tarantula morphs?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Marvinxox, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. Marvinxox

    Marvinxox Arachnoknight

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    Hello
    I think everybody know the OBT or the N. incei "Gold", but I don´t know of any other tarantula "Morphs".
    Does anyone here know about oather tarantulas which are bred in special colours that arent usually found in nature?
     
  2. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnoangel Active Member

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    i think you may be misunderstanding those color forms.

    Not 100% sure on the N. incei, but the P. murinus color forms are all locality variations that DO redily occur in nature in different areas. i don't know for sure, but i believe that the coloring is also not the same as 'morphs' of say a ball python, where a trait is either shown or not. i believe a cross of the different color forms of the P. murinus (OBT) will just create an inbetween color that can't simply be bred back to normal of either parent traits. The N. incei though i do believe is supposed to be as simple as a dominant/recessive trait. I could be wrong.

    @KezyGLA is the local expert on P. murinus color forms, perhaps he can shed some light.

    Edit: CURRENTLY i know that Avicularia avicularia has 6 different morphotypes/varients which would be more similar to the OBT situation, but it should also be said that many seem to dissagree that all 6 of them are actually the same species.

    Reguardless, i personally would urge people to please only breed spiders of EXACTLY the same type, even if it is a varient of the same species i think it is best to keep them separate.
     
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  3. MikeyD

    MikeyD Arachnosquire Active Member

    May the Tarantula hobby never become the reptile hobby with all of it’s associated interests in anything morph related. Where morphs become valuable and wild forms become unwanted and valueless in the eyes of beeeders.
     
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  4. EulersK

    EulersK Arachnoworm Staff Member

    Yeah, as has been said, these spiders aren't bred to have different colors. They're all naturally occurring genetic differences. In the case of N. incei, that's a simple matter of a recessive gene. In the case of P. murinus, those are localities for the most part.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince

    If there is one species that carrys a recessive gene like N.incei there are others.. It just means that either they are deleterious,there hasn't been enough inbreeding or no one has been able to collect and reproduce a specimen that has abnormal color or pattern mutations.
     
  6. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    I have heard of an LCF "light colour form" Pterinochilus chordatus, too. And then there is Pterinochilus sp "Arusha" which looks like a dark P. murinus or possibly a form of chordatus.

    And where morphs have value even if they come with detrimental health issues to the animals, like the spider gene wobble in Ball Pythons.
     
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  7. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    Pretty much like several dog breeds.

    "Let's get something with a predisposition for seizures and respiratory problems because it's fashionable." :banghead::banghead::banghead:
     
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  8. Teal

    Teal Arachnoking Active Member

    Ohhh don't even get me started on how mucked up a lot of dog breeds are now!
     
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  9. antinous

    antinous Phormic-Addict Arachnosupporter

    The only 'morphotype'/'locality' that matters is P. sp. 'platyomma' 'Hellbright'. And the antinous locales. That is all.
     
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  10. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince Active Member

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    H. devamatha I believe has 2 color forms, and the Phormics can have some color variation between sackmates, but those aren't really color forms. A. seemani had the blue form, and I'm sure there's some other Ts that haven't been listed yet. Oh yeah, and then there's the P. subfusca highland and lowland forms.
     
  11. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnoangel Active Member

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    Isn't lowland form now officially its own species, P. bara?
     
  12. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    No, the WSC still lists highland and lowland as the same species, P. subfusca.
     
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  13. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    According to @KezyGLA , the African expert, those are localities, too. But yes, P. chordatus color varies a lot. I saw a light variant at the last expo and I didn't like it. What makes P. chordatus great is its dark color imo.

    V. paranaensis seems to have 2 color variants, too, a brown one and a darker, grey one. I don't know if these can come from the same sac or if they are localities.
     
  14. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    Nope.
     
  15. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnoangel Active Member

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    You are correct! I guess i shouldn't believe everything i read on the internet...:bookworm:
     
  16. Theneil

    Theneil Arachnoangel Active Member

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    :bag:
     
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  17. KezyGLA

    KezyGLA Arachnoking Active Member

    Yes there is a lighter form of P. chordatus thought to be found farther south east of Mount Kilimanjaro.

    See link- https://i.pinimg.com/originals/3a/1b/0a/3a1b0ae6037c97fcb7d59f2b31c8cba3.jpg

    There is P. chordatus ’Mastov’ which is the darker variant. Deep brown, near black in colour.

    These two forms have been mixed in the hobby making varying colours of brown lol

    There is also Pterinochilus sp. ‘Arusha’ which is thought to be chordatus too. It is golden brown/grey in colour.

    See link- https://www.facebook.com/ArachnoFrance/photos/a.504090813100278/1192337107608975/?type=3




    There has also been “Pterinochilus vorax” sold in the hobby at some point but is rare. But I think this could also be chordatus too, as these two species are quite hard to differenciate between when studying taxonomic features.

    If it is chordatus then it is a silverish blue/grey form

    (WC female, imported as P. vorax)

    I studied the moult from the above pictured “vorax”, the spermathecae seems to be extremely similar to chordatus but has additional lobes party formed. She is an adult though so if was actually vorax these would be more prominent. I am on the fence with this one.
     
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  18. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnobaron Active Member

    The worst part about it is somewhere along the line of say, a pug, the breeder had a puppy born with a face like a tuna can and said “I want THAT one”. Seriously, how did we get from the majestic wolf to that?
     
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  19. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    They are absolutely hideous, I have no idea how they've become so popular lately.
     
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  20. boina

    boina Lady of the mites Arachnosupporter

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    Don't get me started on pugs, just don't... they are a walking health problem disguising as a dog.
     
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