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Tarantula and frog enclosure

Discussion in 'Vivariums and Terrariums' started by Johnnygoblin01, Jan 14, 2019.

Can they be kept together in a large enclosure

  1. What species

    1 vote(s)
    7.7%
  2. Never

    12 vote(s)
    92.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Johnnygoblin01

    Johnnygoblin01 Arachnopeon

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    I have a 50 gallon fish tank I was thinking of turning into a vivarium is there any wau I could put a waterfall habitat on one side for a dart frog or two and on the other a arboreal environment for a tarantula
     
  2. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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    Nope. Two seperate enclosures, yes.
     
  3. Johnnygoblin01

    Johnnygoblin01 Arachnopeon

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    What if I used a screen division so that the humidity from the waterfall still works and it isn't noticeable I or are there any like parasites etc that could cross I'm not taking into account
     
  4. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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    Still nope.

    Here are the problems:

    1. The way of keeping frogs and tarantulas are different. Not only that, one will get eaten by the other.

    2. Hence you can’t keep them together.

    3. Therefore, having a divider or not, they can’t be kept in same tank.

    4. Two seperate enclosures is your best and only way to keep them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2019
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  5. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

    Dart frogs would be a no. If you could find dotted humming frogs for sale you could give it a try with a Xenesthis immanis. Though you would need to take the care for both species into account. I’m pretty sure one of the main reasons the tarantula won’t eat them like it would eat any other small frog is that they’re toxic, I’m not sure if they’re like many other frogs where they get this toxin from their prey but if it is the case you would need to provide them with prey that would give them the toxins they need to reduce the chance of them getting eaten

    Edit: also let me guess, you’ve either seen an article about the frog and tarantula or you’ve seen Tierzoo’s new YouTube videos?
     
  6. Johnnygoblin01

    Johnnygoblin01 Arachnopeon

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    I figured if I gave them enough space or used a divider and kept tarantula well fed it wouldn't beab problem

    After i made the thread I found this When I made thread I found this
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2019
  7. Patherophis

    Patherophis Arachnoknight Active Member

    There is no way to feed it enough to poit when it would ignore cohabitants.
    Divided enclosures are not considered good idea here, as there were cases of animals (Ts) managing to get from one part to other. Also Ts generaly dont prefer high air humidity.
     
  8. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

    Problem with that is you’re not going to be able to feed the tarantula as soon as it starts feeling hungry because you’re not gonna be able to tell if it is or isn’t hungry until it grabs the frog. And with species like X. immanis that have been observed with frogs they’re nearly always hungry
    Especially with a tropical NW terrestrial like X. immanis, they are eating machines
     
  9. antinous

    antinous Pamphopharaoh Arachnosupporter

    According to my friend who took the photos of the frog with the tarantula (It’s an undescribed Pamphobeteus sp. not Xenesthis, unless they’re able to tolerate these frogs too), it’s interesting to see. He’s seen them pick them up and put them down in some cases.
     
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  10. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

    I think it’s been observed in several species of tarantulas with several species of Microhylid frogs actually so that wouldn’t surprise me, only I think its Xenethsis that specifically lives with the dotted humming frog unless it’s the other way round and it’s the Pampho with the humming frog, or possibly both. Pretty sure somebody made a long and detailed post about it and the different species observed together here on AB but I don’t remember where or the species mentioned
     
  11. Johnnygoblin01

    Johnnygoblin01 Arachnopeon

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    Ok like I said it was just a thought I have this 50 gallon tank and was thinking of what to do with it I thought a dart frog and rain forest species of tarantula might be able to live in the same enclosure since the come from the same environment
     
  12. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    IMO those 50 gallon (and more) tank/s should be used only for aquarium/fish 'n stuff, not for T's, never, no matter the species.

    Isn't 'overkill'... more, and would be annoying to check and control, in such a huuge space, substrate moistness etc (unless you place a 'Grammo' or the likes of 'Grammos' inside that, but well).
     
  13. Johnnygoblin01

    Johnnygoblin01 Arachnopeon

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  14. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    @Johnnygoblin01
    Yes, I've read that but I didn't even replied, man :)

    I mean, was IMO a too wrong (nothing bad into asking something, anyway, don't get me wrong) at every level, besides, others already answered before me.

    Splitting a huge enclosure/put a space in the middle of those etc... nope. Mostly is a recipe for a disaster and btw, what about the 'humidity' part? Now ain't a Dart Frog expert at all, but they needs a kinda humid environment, sorta 'paludarium' (I think) while no arboreal T's needs something like that. A warranty for headaches.

    So, bottom line, my advice is don't be mad or complicate your life with that. The truth is that, the likes of 50 gallon enclosures aren't suitable (more correct, exaggerated) for T's, they are 'impractical'.
     
  15. Johnnygoblin01

    Johnnygoblin01 Arachnopeon

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    I'm not mad i just was curious
     
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  16. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    I didn't said that you are mad, and nothing wrong about asking questions :)

    I've said 'don't be mad', 'don't bother with' etc because wouldn't work... in sum = don't :writer:
     
  17. Rhino1

    Rhino1 Arachnosquire Active Member

    Not saying this is a good idea but just thinking about it, having a solid glass, permanent divider siliconed in place and screen tops would be like 2 seperate tanks.
    Or why not put 2 smaller tanks side by side and make it look like the decor plants follow through to the next tank, you could like cut a log with the join following through into the next tank, use same substrate plants etc
    Back in the late 90's I kept green tree frogs (litoria) with 2 jaguar python hybrids (morelia) for well over 12 months in the same enclosure with no dividers all were healthy and functioned normally there was no symbiotic relationship or any sort of undue stress noticed.
    This was the story mentioned with humming frog.
    http://www.isopoda.net/contents/the-odd-couple-spider-frog-mutualism-in-the-amazon-rainforest/
     
  18. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnonovelist Arachnosupporter

    Even with a "permanent" divider, it's still a massively horrible idea. The number of precise variables involved in real world ecosystem is such that not even the top rated zoos can truly mimic a "completely naturalistic" environment. The care requirements are massively different for amphibians and theraphosid spiders. Too much humidity will kill a spider in captivity. A hungry spider will kill a frog in captivity. Or else they'll both die due to unforeseen husbandry mistakes. Sell that 50 gallon tank. Buy two more suitable enclosures, one for the tarantula, and one for the frogs.