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Spider ID

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by catfishrod69, Mar 17, 2012.

  1. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

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    Ok i went to rehouse one of my P. muticus females earlier, and found this little guy in the substrate of the new home. It looks like a young K. hibernalis. Im hoping it is. I wouldnt figure they are this far north (Ohio), but i have family from NC here right now, and thought maybe it hitchhiked along. But then it would have to travel upstairs to my T room, and then climb up a dresser, and then get into the enclosure. Not saying that isnt totally possible, but seemed odd. Its fangs do look forward pointing like a tarantula's. I couldnt get a great look at them though because the little guy was lightning fast and wouldnt hold still much. The abdomen is grayish silk looking. Its about 1" long. Any ideas? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. I dont know much about juvie K. hibernalis but the carapace on this one is quite rounded and has no depression in the middle. Cheiracanthium inclusum the Yellow Sac Spider perhaps?
     
  3. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Well all the pics i seen of C. inclusum dont really match mine. They are mostly yellow, and the spider i found has a reddish carapace and legs, and a greyish abdomen.
     
  4. awolfe

    awolfe Arachnosquire

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    Last fall I found one that looked like this one and we identified it as a Dysdera crocata, at least that's what it looked like according to national wildlife federation insects aand spider. Field guide.
     
  5. awolfe

    awolfe Arachnosquire

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    NRYKARFK3RX0Q0U0Z060Z090CRQQH090FRIQYRW0Q0SQH0P0H0XQS090FRN0CRKQQ0SQTRSQORSQCRSQJRU0L0.jpg
    dysdera crocata
     
  6. Malhavoc's

    Malhavoc's Arachnoking Old Timer

    Not going to be a D. crocata carapace/fangs etc don't mach plus they usualy have minimal hair, his has hair.
     
  7. awolfe

    awolfe Arachnosquire

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    Whats ur guess, I live in ohio also and have seen similar
     
  8. Malhavoc's

    Malhavoc's Arachnoking Old Timer

    I've seen similiar, however, I do not recall/not confident with the family to gie a guess, but I am going through my google prowess :)
     
  9. awolfe

    awolfe Arachnosquire

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  10. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Well i took a closer look at it, and it has the little dimples on the abdomen like the K. hibernalis. But im not sure what all species have those dimples. And i gave it a small cricket, and it immediately took it. I tried to watch the fangs, they are small, but did look like they were forward pointing. Also its almost impossible to tell in that ventral shot, but it has 1 set of booklungs.
     
  11. Hi, guys. It is definitely not a Kukulcania hibernalis, nor is it an Dysdera crocata. It is a ground-dwelling spider, but alas, the name eludes me.... :-(
     
  12. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Hey man i was just getting ready to pm you, and seen your last post was on this thread. Thanks. I have looked through bugguide, but as you know identifying native true spiders is hard. When i first seen it, i thought Hacklemesh weaver, until i got a closer look. This thing is almost as fast as my huntsman.
     
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  13. Malhavoc's

    Malhavoc's Arachnoking Old Timer

    http://bugguide.net/node/view/611471/bgimage

    One in the Clubiona family could be a guess, but with only an underside look at the chelicera and being unfimiliar with the taxo of these families I can't say.

    I've found spiders of similiar shape and colour, often the hairs of the abdomen look almost metallic; I find them under rocks or in rolled up leaves that they turn into a home, But alas. Thats about all I know and the ones I find are similiar not identicle :/
     
  14. pitbulllady

    pitbulllady Arachnoking Old Timer

    This is a Gnaphosid spider, probably in the Gnaphosa genus; the long spinnerettes are a dead give-away. These are very common indoor spiders pretty much all over North America. They DO look a bit like mini tarantula, especially with those long spinnerettes and forward-facing chelicerae, but are "true" spiders. K.hibernalis does not have visible spinnerettes when seen from above, and they aren't that fast, either.

    pitbulllady
     
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  15. catfishrod69

    catfishrod69 Arachnoemperor

    Thanks pitbulllady. I tried looking through bugguide again under the Gnaphosa genus, and there were a few that looked like it, but cant be positive. Here is a quick link to the Gnaphosa genus. http://bugguide.net/node/view/1970/bgpage
     
  16. cacoseraph

    cacoseraph ArachnoGod Old Timer

    the squared off spinners make me think Gnaphosidae, too. GL getting down to species, though. there are lots of them
     
  17. lizardminion

    lizardminion Arachnolord

    I'm finding your specimen there looks somewhat like a Gnaphosa sericata, or Gnaphosa alacris. Maybe it's a juvenile- that'd probably explain the lighter color. :eek:
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
  18. Venom

    Venom Arachnoprince Old Timer

    Perhaps a species of Drassodes ?
     
  19. Tcrazy

    Tcrazy Arachnobaron

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    to me it kinda looks like the Clubiona reclusa but i could be wrong..