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solfugids

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Justin, Feb 3, 2003.

  1. Justin

    Justin Arachnosquire Old Timer

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    this is really to alex s, where do you get your solfugids? do you know any good breeders that sell them?
     
  2. Justin

    Justin Arachnosquire Old Timer

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    I see that glades herp sells them, but im concerned about if it will be alive when it arrives, i have herd how alot of the time when they arrive they are dead, why is that?
     
  3. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Solifugids

    I usually keep the native U.S. Eremobatidae species that I collect myself here in CA. I usually keep Eremobates pallipes or Eremobates californicus althought these species do live very shortly. I used to occasionally purchase Galeodidae specimens but now just mainly keep Eremobatids. There really is no such thing as a solifugid breeder as they are really never bred in captivity as it is extremely difficult, almost near impossible. Getting solifugids through the mail is riskey as they are sometimes packaged wrong, there for the solifugid may die during travel. Hope that helped.

    Alex S.
     
  4. Justin

    Justin Arachnosquire Old Timer

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    yeah, thanks, i am going to get one soon, regardless there short life span, there to cool.
     
  5. dennis

    dennis Arachnodemon Old Timer

    Re: Solifugids

    Sounds like a challenge doesn't it?
     
  6. Kaissos5

    Kaissos5 Arachnosquire

    hey alex, i too live in CA, where do you go to find yours?
     
  7. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Re: Re: Solifugids

    I believe it does ;)

    Alex S.
     
  8. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Eremobates pallipes can be found pretty much all along the western coast in the right regions. I usually find them in dry wooded or semi-wooded areas here in northern CA. They can be found as far north as southwestern Canada and as far south as Texas in desert, scrubland, and other somewhat dry areas. Look under logs, stones, leaf-litter, etc.

    Alex S.
     
  9. genious_gr

    genious_gr Arachnoangel Old Timer

    :confused: emmm what is a solfugid??? could someone post a picture???
     
  10. dennis

    dennis Arachnodemon Old Timer

    I found this picture ...

    [​IMG]
    A windscorpion or solfugid, (Solfugae: Eremobatidae).



    I dont have any experience with it either, so I'm not sure if this is one or not :p . It kinda looks like a red spider to me ...


    Ðennis
     
  11. Wade

    Wade Arachnoking Old Timer

    Yes, that's a solfugid. They lack the venom of spiders and they do not produce silk. The one pictured is missing a leg. The two large appendages in the front are pedipalps. The chelicerae are huge and opposable, a very different arrangement from a spiders's fangs.

    Wade
     
  12. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Solifugae (solifugids, camelspiders, windscorpions)

    Solifugids are are arachnids, order: Solifugae. These creatures are commonly known as, of course, solifugids, as well as sunspiders, windscorpions, sunscorpions, and camelspiders. They range in size (body length) from less than 1/7" to over 3" (the largest species are Galeodes arabs and Galeodes caspius). They are extremely successful predators commonly taking down prey such as crickets, beetles, moths and small lizards, but large species can take down snakes, mice, and even small birds. Most of the worlds solifugid population occurs in Africa. There are about 120 species in the USA (families Eremobatidae and Ammotrechidae). There are around 900 species and 12 families worldwide, of these only one species, Rhagodes nigrocinctus, is venemous. Solifugids have just two eyes as well as an 11 segmented abdomen and a 3 segmented cephalothorax. The pedipalps are quite long and used for probing the ground for prey etc. The first pair of legs is quite small and weak, while the other 3 pairs are very strong and used for runnung, which solifugids are extrmely fast (recorded up to 10 mph). The chelicerae are huge (can be almost 1/2 the solifugids body length in some species) pincer-like objects used fo killing and macerating prey. Thats some basic info.

    Solifugid Families:

    Ammotrechidae
    Eremobatidae
    Galeodidae
    Solpugidae
    Rhagodidae
    Daesiidae
    Melanoblossidae
    Karschiidae
    Hexisopodidae
    Gylippidae
    Mummuciidae (was sub. fam of Ammotrechidae)
    Ceromidae

    Alex S.
     
  13. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Yes, this is a solifugid of the family Eremobatidae, most likely the species Eremobates nodularis.

    Alex S.
     
  14. atavuss

    atavuss Arachnoprince Old Timer

    Alex, which part of northern calif do you live in? I am in central calif, about an hour south of Sacramento. what size are our native E. Pallipes?
    Ed
     
  15. Paladin

    Paladin Arachnobaron Old Timer

    hey alex s. are you familiar with an area ib cali called "hi desert"? im not sure the real name (if thats not it...its sort of in socal). I ask because my dad would take us 4 wheeling in a jeep club up there and we would come across a few of them. Usually we found these really leggy ones that were extremely fast. We actually lost one in the back of the jeep and we all freaked....

    but i was just curious because you live in california and collect your own.
     
  16. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Hey Ed, I live around an hour east from the bay area. E. pallipes adults max out at around 1" in body length. The abdomen is a creamy white color while the legs, cephalothorax, and chelicerae are more of a light yellow, although some specimens can get very light white-tan or yellow-tan shade.

    Alex S.
     
  17. Alex S.

    Alex S. Arachnolord

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    Hey Paladin, never heard of "hi desert", but thats great that you guys have seen some solifugids in the wild. They are alot more common in CA than most people think. You guys probably found Eremobates californicus (common California solifugid), which is a leggy species, awesome species as well :)

    Alex S.