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So anyone ever get this question

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by Jerry, Mar 28, 2016.

  1. Jerry

    Jerry Arachnobaron

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    Guy walks up to me at work he says your really into spiders aren't you I say yes he says hay you know what the most poison is spider in the world is right I say no which one BUM BUM BUM
    The daddy long leg BUT its fangs aren't long enufe to pierce human skin
    WTF are you kidding :banghead:
     
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  2. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    all the time....all the time.
     
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  3. Spidermolt

    Spidermolt Arachnoknight

    YES ALL THE TIME! And it's so annoying!! :mad:!!! But yeah that's funny that you brought it up because i just briefly explained the cellar spider myth in YagerManJennsen's "Anyone know this species?" post just today when i helped him identify his picture of one.
     
  4. ErinM31

    ErinM31 Arachnodemon Active Member

    It is nonsense, whether he was referring to the spiders that go by that common name -- Pholcidae -- or the non-spider group of arachnids that also go by that common name, the Opiliones. The first produces very weak venom and the second, none at all.
     
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  5. The Snark

    The Snark Extremely jaded cynical yet optomistic Old Timer

    But you forgot to mention the most lethal combination of 'poisons' ever known to man: ignorance and imagination. Couple that to arachnophobia and watch out!
     
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  6. lunarae

    lunarae Arachnobaron

    And correct me if I'm wrong but outside of like one or two species, no spider species is actually poisonous, they're all venomous.
     
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  7. Jerry

    Jerry Arachnobaron

    He was speaking of opiliones and swore that they were deadly LOL
     
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  8. The Snark

    The Snark Extremely jaded cynical yet optomistic Old Timer

    The Opillione myth has been explained. In actuality it was in reference to various pholcidae. They are one of the most effective combatants in the spider world. It was noted that they tended to accumulate numerous other spiders as victims in their webs. Then enter the moron crowd jumping to the conclusion they must have a deadly venom. More moron crowd poured in with they are the most 'poisonous' but since nobody has become ill from their bites yada yada yada. The use of the word poisonous tells us exactly how brilliant those pundits are.

    In combat, the pholcidae has two interesting aspects. Immensely long legs and extremely adept in their use, and their webs lack of sticky lines. The pholcids, instead of relying on sticky lines had to resort to combatant techniques alone which the tribe has perfected over it's evolutionary life span. The upshot of this is they can kick ass, especially when it comes to whomping on other spiders. The non pholcid that enters their web encounters nothing but legs swiftly trying to tie up it's victim combined with lightning speed nips. The venom is pretty weak but getting webbed and enough nips, just about any spider is going to succumb eventually. The alternative is escape as it would be just about impossible for any spider, web oriented or not, to catch a pholcid on it's own turf.
     
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  9. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoking

    Ah ah they are so lovely. They deserve to be called "spiders" as well :)
     
  10. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX Arachnoking

    Phalangium opilio are number 1
     
  11. ErinM31

    ErinM31 Arachnodemon Active Member

    Hmm, perhaps you should introduce him to this newfangled technology called Google, where he could check such things before looking the fool! :smuggrin:
     
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  12. ErinM31

    ErinM31 Arachnodemon Active Member

    That's really cool -- thanks for sharing! I think I have one of these just inside my entryway and I did wonder at how many other spider remains were in its web. I have one kickass guard! :D
     
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  13. The Snark

    The Snark Extremely jaded cynical yet optomistic Old Timer

    I first encountered Pholcids en masse here in Thailand. Human structures seems to be the perfect habitat for them and not just the cellars. They aren't photophobic at all. At first I protected and studied them but finally got real and vacuum them up whenever encountered. It makes no dent in their population. A quick check a minute ago and I found 1 in the bathroom, about 10 on the upstairs landing and 5 or 6 in my work room. I use them as an indicator of when I need to clean the house again.

    We have two basic models. One with the back of the abdomen squared off, shaped like a hatchet, and a rounded off butt. It was people here on AB that clued me to their harems and communal life style. They share each others webbing and prey without any competitiveness.

    It was Rod Crawford that brought my attention to their nipping. You really have to watch extremely closely. As they try to web a victim they take lightning speed nips. The speed is very reminiscent of a rattle snake. Very easy to miss they do it so fast.

    The other thing worth studying is those long legs and how they negotiate their cobwebs. One would think the ultra long legs would be a detriment but it has no negative effect at all on their maneuverability, They also don't pay all that much attention to their position in their webs when lurking. With Latrodectus they prefer tummy up, with nephila it's nose down. With pholcids it seems to be purely whatever works.

    Really, they are an apex of adaptation. Effective fighters, prolific breeders - it is common to find a few egg sacks scattered around a communal web, uncaring as to where they make their webs, and their habits make them immune to the larger predators like the geckos and sparassids. Never seen them get noticed and munched.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016
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  14. Jerry

    Jerry Arachnobaron

    I have a cellar spider in my collection it came to me in a container of flightless fruit flies I bought from petco I think she was just hanging out eating her fill of fruit flies when the colony finally died out I was moving her to a better container when I realized she had an egg sack witch has hatched and now I have a bunch of them the baby's are so crazy looking with tiny body's and crazy long legs
     
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  15. The Snark

    The Snark Extremely jaded cynical yet optomistic Old Timer

    Those little tykes are ridiculous. Legs everywhere and you almost need to grab the magnifying glass to see what they are attached to. That's a speck of dust! Oh, nope, it's a sling.
     
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  16. edgeofthefreak

    edgeofthefreak Arachno-titled!

    I share a deep respect for this genus as well, and have several billion in my concrete building in Ontario Canada. They are the only spiders with webs in the P2 parking garage, and even though they are now filled with black soot, they'll make a new one tomorrow. The pollution takes several days to stick to their non-sticky webs, so they rule supreme down there.

    It's their defense thrashing technique that amazes me. It's tough to trigger, but I've been able to pull at some out-lying webs, and triggered a couple of quick corner dashes from the Pholcid. It's deliberately tugging, in case what it feels me doing is actually a lurking spider. If that spider wanders further in, she'll dash in, thrashing much faster. This is to both create chaos on it's own terms, and assess the situation. Most spiders would be thrown off by the lack of sticky webs - likely (to me) it would feel like old webbing, and have little support for the victim here.

    And as I just learned, this would be where the nips would come in. Tangling their prey up, nipping whenever close enough. Those thin wiry legs can help keep a distance, or pull in. I always figured they just tangled enough to eventually get one good bite in. Nipping would help with subdue ETA.

    In the event this prey is too much to handle, they fold up all their legs, and pass through the web to wherever gravity takes them. It's fun to try and catch these guys, only to have them slip like water off my hands. It actually makes them tough to show off to arachnophobic people...

    "See they-- whoa hold on, gotcha-- they are harm-- whoa again, slippery little-- harmless crea-- WHOA-- that's your shirt! HarmlesscreaturesthatwouldnteventrytohurtyouSorry!"

    And now everyone is running from the guy who is throwing the most poisonous spiders down the shirts of random people.
     
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  17. The Snark

    The Snark Extremely jaded cynical yet optomistic Old Timer

    NODS! That is weird. Like in defiance of natural laws. You would think this ungainly long legged creature would be easy to catch and contain but it's like trying to pick up a blob of mercury with a pair of pliers.

    I just harassed one into giving up it's secret. It's painfully obvious when you look closely. You think they move their legs as people, swinging them. Nope. Each leg operates on it's own linear path. It withdraws the leg to walk or folds it like a jack knife. Extend, retract. So it can move in any direction any of the legs points to!
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2016
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  18. edgeofthefreak

    edgeofthefreak Arachno-titled!

    ^ Agreed. Very defiant creatures indeed. Very overlooked as well. Wonder how well they do in captivity (he types, knowing there's about 50 in the house...).
     
  19. The Snark

    The Snark Extremely jaded cynical yet optomistic Old Timer

    From what I am observing, it's a little hard to tell who is in charge and which organism is hosting the rest. IE, we are cohabiting with the Pholcids but they were here first and are far more numerous.
    Had a silly one yesterday morning. One of those 10 by 10 paper egg cartons was left out on the counter for two nights. About 15 of the egg dents had a baby pholcid installed.

    One bonus! Stick my hand into some hole around here and into a mass of webs I think, 'darned pholcids!'. In California the think is 'ACK! Black widow!'.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016
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  20. jaredc

    jaredc Arachnosquire

    I'm in southern California I see these guys en masse in parking structures particularly. I recall on the bottom floor of a particularly deep lot they thrived right next to a generator or some kind of duct system; the area was fenced off and covered in cobwebs and there were easily thousands of them all hanging about it various positions. I've also spent plenty of my breaks at school sitting below their cobweb/web combos on the 5th floor outside stairwell watching them mill their legs around. Obviously very hardy creatures.

    EDIT for snark: The amount of widows here is staggering! Latrodectus geometricus seems the most hardy and has spread like wildfire. I caught what I thought was a sling and raised it to maturity and it turned out to be a Steatoda grossa, sneaky mimic.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2016
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