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Should my Mexican red knee be doing this?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Hansfroyo, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Hansfroyo

    Hansfroyo Arachnopeon

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    I got her today she's my first T and I'm wondering if my substrate is too wet? Putting her in her new home she has spent the last 10 hours sitting on the glass near the top. Im using coconut coconut fiber, maybe I added too much water? Or she's acclimating to her new surroundings. I don't know I'm kind of freaking out being a new spider mom. Is this normal? And when should I try to feed her? I'm sorry if these questions are stupid I just want to do my best with her. Should I maybe change the substrate? I attached a picture showing her new home, maybe someone can give me pointers? Any help would be greatly appreciated
     

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  2. Arachnophoric

    Arachnophoric Arachnoknight Active Member

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    I'm willing to bet it's that the substrate is too loose. Spiders don't like loose substrate - and if the substrate is wet, that is likely adding to it. Assuming by "Mexican red knee" you're meaning Brachypelma hamorii, this species doesn't really appreciate moisture in their substrate. The substrate honestly looks a little too chunky for my personal tastes, I prefer finer ground cocofiber. Holds burrows better IME.

    Also, that enclosure is way too tall for your T as a terrestrial species. A fall from that height can rupture the abdomen and kill it - this literally just happened less than a week ago to someone's A. chalcodes in an enclosure very similar to yours. A good "rule of thumb" is that the height of the enclosure from substrate to top shouldn't exceed 1.5x the T's legspan - a 4" T should have 6" of space from the substrate to the top of the enclosure.

    As far as feedi
     
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  3. Hansfroyo

    Hansfroyo Arachnopeon

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    Yes that's what I'm referring to a hamorii, when I went to repticon they kept telling me this was perfect for the red knee. I guess tomrotom I'll go ahead and add a high level of soil or vermiculite? And ditch the current one. Would that help?
     
  4. Gaherp

    Gaherp Arachnofarmer Old Timer

    I agree, the exo-terra is a bit tall I won't say it will inevitably happen, but with solid structures in the vivarium and enough height it is possible. Unfortunately they only make a few of the shorter sizes in that model of vivs. As for substrate for my brachy's I use a coco-bedding(fine grain), soil, and clay mix. It may initially be moist but I let it dry out except at the very bottom and around water dish. My Porteri and a few other arid region T's do the same thing until they either web it up or I compact it a little bit. Just remember though even if it is a desert T a water dish in the enclosure will still get utilized, but don't expect them to keep it free of soil.
     
  5. Arachnophoric

    Arachnophoric Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Well, whoever told you that was incorrect. I mean, you COULD keep her in there, but I wouldn't. Case and point right here. It may be shallow enough that a full grown adult female would be alright in it if you filled substrate to the lip of the glass on the lower part, but it's definitely too tall for your T currently. What's its legspan?

    Adding soil to help make up the height difference would definitely help, but if your using soil make sure it's additive-free. Plain topsoil. A lot of brands put chemicals and pesticides in soil meant for gardening that can be harmful to your T. I'm not really familiar with vermiculite so anyone feel free to chime in if I'm wrong, but I believe it's mainly used to hold humidity, which is completely unnecessary for your T. So I'd just stick with the soil.
     
  6. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Just curious who was the vendor that you told you this was perfect setup for a terrestrial? I'd like to steer clear of them.

    Also if T is new to container they go vertical all the time. Also, loose sub like cocofiber (I use it) they aren't a fan of, they get used to it in my opinion, but they didn't evolve living on such loose sub, just an FYI.

    Now for the ExoTerra, there is HOPE for you, you need to do the following modification so that your T will thrive and not take a dive and die.

    You won't be able to add enough substrate in that style of tank for it to be safe for a terrestrial, do the below OR get a new setup.

    Tererstrial Ts, esp adults, should have only about 1.5X DLS of a distance from sub height to lid so they don't fall.

    I use ExoTerra Breeder Box Large for my adult NWs. including this species.

    http://arachnoboards.com/threads/ex...rom-arboreal-to-terrestrial-pic-heavy.259864/
     
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  7. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    There is no hard and fast rule, feed whenever, but don't feel like there s a hurry.
    With all the poor info out there, just ask your questions, you won't likely get steered wrong here on these boards.

    Well, normally would just say leave t and t will dry, but fact is that they sold you the most expensive enclosure possible, not because it was good for the t, but because t was best for the sellers wallet. Totally inappropriate enclosure for a terrestrial. The front doors prevent adding enough sub to make t safe. You can use it, but it takes modification so the door is on top.

    My recommendation is to basically start over with a more proper enclosure. The breeder boxes viper mentioned are a good start.
    1. vermiculite is an additive, not a substrate on its own. Its something some people will add a small amount of to their sub for moisture retention purposes, but its not a necessity by any means. I've never used it.

    2. You want literally the lowest grade of top soil available. The cheap stuff is the only stuff without additives, even the
    "organic" kinds can have compost or even manure added, so avoid those as well. I get this at home depot, its less than $2 for a 40lb bag.


    Keep in mind, that sub needs to be tamped down, but in the case of soil, it does not. Tamping dirt will just make it harden into practically concrete. Its dense enough so you can just pour it in.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
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  8. Alvara1996

    Alvara1996 Arachnopeon

    Definitely agree on the substrate height problem (as will everyone), but I wouldn't worry too much if she climbs at first. My B hamorii spent the first few days upside down on the ceiling (with dry cocofibre for the substrate), then settled to a more normal floor-dwelling mode
     
  9. Joldenra

    Joldenra Arachnopeon

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    Don't feel as if u need to remodel the entire enclosure just make a solid spot where he can just relax preferably under a light or comfortable spot. He will eventually spread webs all over the floor and be fine walking on them. And also this type of spider does not need allot of humidity so ease up on that. I don't think you should over think his soil because he will adapt to it but try to feed it like 2 times a week and if he doesn't eat everything slow down. How healthy your spiders food is depends on what it eats so try to give it some kind of calcium gelatin fed crickets for both hydration and vitamins. I may not be an expert but my t is still alive and it's been living off this for years. And one more thing try and not to leave dead or alive crickets in there for longer than a day so i have recently learned. Here is a pic of the cricket food I use
     

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  10. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    Under a light? Why would you think this? Ts have no light requirements and lights that create heat should always be avoided.
    These supplements are geared toward reptiles and have no place with ts. Calcium isn't even something you would need or want to add. Just drop in a piece of carrot or something, its that easy.
     
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  11. AnimalNewbie

    AnimalNewbie Arachnobaron Active Member

    This is almost completely wrong
    You don’t need any lights or heat sources like heat pads or lamps. There not reptiles they don’t need these special food and they like it dry. Don’t listen to this guy
     
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  12. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Do yo know of the vitamin and mineral requirements of a tarantula? If one was going to use polyacrylamide as a water matrix, one should use the product that is w/out calcium. The product you mentioned is for reptiles.

    Not needed either--- what's your rationale on this one? You do realize almost all tarantulas do their best to remain hidden in some fashion.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2018
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  13. Arachnophoric

    Arachnophoric Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Didn't you post a thread earlier about how your G. porteri wasn't eating and the enclosure/care was noted to be wrong?

    I understand that you're just trying to help, but you should really wait until your own husbandry is on lockdown. I mean that in the most polite way possible.
     
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  14. Hansfroyo

    Hansfroyo Arachnopeon

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    Hey guys! So here's an update she's still perferring this one spot in the back on the glass, she's webbed up the glass and plants I added as much substrate as I could and if she falls it shouldn't be too bad. But like I said the spot she's in the plants would cushion the fall. Only thing is she still hasn't eaten and it's almost been a wake. She ignores super works and runs away from crickets. My one and only real struggle right now. Any adivce?
     

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  15. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnobaron Active Member

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    I'm not sure if its the lighting, but that substrate looks very moist. These guys prefer their enclosures dry, which would explain why it's climbing. It's most likely uncomfortable. How often are you feeding it? A week without food is perfectly normal. Actually, some people only feed every two weeks and their tarantulas are just as healthy.
     
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  16. MintyWood826

    MintyWood826 Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Tarantulas don't need to eat as often as you seem to think; one week isn't something to worry about. I agree that the substrate does not look dry enough, which is a possible reason for the climbing. B. hamorii is a terrestrial and shouldn't be hanging around the top.
     
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  17. CyclingSam

    CyclingSam Arachnoknight Active Member

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    None of my spiders could relax until I provided them with these: https://www.etsy.com/listing/516125...uery=dollhouse lawn chair&ref=sr_gallery-1-26

    :troll:
     
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  18. Hansfroyo

    Hansfroyo Arachnopeon

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    I mean it does feel a little moist, how would I dry it out? I didn't think it was too bad