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"Seasons" for Ts?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by doodleBug, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. doodleBug

    doodleBug Arachnopeon Active Member

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    This is probably most important for breeding but in terms of Ts growing from sling-hood to adult would one want/need to create seasons? This being light shifts, temp variation (including a "night" temp), and wet/dry seasons. I already have to heat my Ts artificially as my house stays around 60-65* f which is much too chilly for them. My micro-climate is currently in a room with no windows (stupid I know, working on it...) so i have a dim lamp in the room on a light-dark cycle. I figure if I'm already doing artificial lighting/temp regulation I might as well do it "right" if need be.

    I guess my question is... do slings/Ts need 'seasons?' Does it help them in any way? Or would I just be doing it for my own peace of mind to create as realistic an environment as possible and make myself feel better about a captive animal. I mean our critters (tarantulas and others) already adapt to so many abnormal things, I feel like a lot of animal keepers do unnecessary stuff to make themselves feel better when really there's no ultimate benefit for the pet at all.

    I found a graph (attached) that is supposed to be similar to what my current Ts would experience in the wild. However I don't know if this info is accurate and I'm not entirely sure I'm reading it right.... I have one Lampropelma 'sp' "Borneo Black" 1" and one P. Metallica 1.25". So I guess question #2: Would this graph be accurate for these species? Can anyone help me out and share how to read it? Preferably someone who knows Celsius and mm because I live in the USA and am not particularly familiar with either of those units and I'm not fond of spending a load of time on google fussing with conversions. Lazy I know :/ Mostly interested in if the graph is accurate to the species I have though.

    Thanks in advance mates! :D

    temp graph.png
     
  2. Anoplogaster

    Anoplogaster Arachnobaron Active Member

    You're probably overthinking it. Tarantulas are pretty simple to keep. There really isn't a need for seasonal fluctuations for success in raising slings in captivity. Most of us just raise slings in deli cups in whatever room, without much thought about seasons or light cycles. They just need food and water:)
     
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  3. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    P metallica is not found in Indonesia.

    You'd think before finding data that you MIGHT want to know where your Ts come from. Let me guess, you were too lazy to find out that information too?

    I know metric quite well.

    If you are too lazy to look up metric conversions, why do you even think someone else should do your work for you? Mind boggling, truly.

    0C is freezing, I'm too lazy to type the rest :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
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  4. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    I really wish we lived in the same city.. I would love to see you after a few drinks.. Lol..
     
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  5. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Unless your breeding there is really no need to replicate any specific seasons for your tarantulas.. They will naturally cycle with the seasonal changes in your region..

    I do believe that giving them a distinct photo period is important. Whether they are just "pets" or breeders.
     
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  6. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    They dont require seasons or light cycles.
     
  7. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    You're over complicating something that will probably just hurt you in the end.
    My light cycle is opening the blinds in the morning, and that's mostly just for my plant. :/
     
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  8. boina

    boina Arachnobaron Arachnosupporter

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    :hilarious::p
     
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  9. KezyGLA

    KezyGLA Arachnoking Active Member

    They only time you might want to simulate seasons is when breeding. Once you have all your females moult cycles synced up it is easier to have them all conditioned and paired in the right environment. This will make the females drop sacs within right time frame and usually if the conditions are correct then the healthier the sac will be.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
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  10. mconnachan

    mconnachan Arachnoprince Active Member

    I was laughing at that one as well...metric conversations...lol, - conversion.
     
  11. mconnachan

    mconnachan Arachnoprince Active Member

    The only seasonal change my T's get is the light difference between summer through to winter, and the temps are slightly colder as well, you're over thinking this, it's not rocket science even if you're breeding as @KezyGLA pointed out, just enjoy them pal.
     
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  12. Jones0911

    Jones0911 Arachnobaron Active Member


    Not necessary, whatever season I'm in is what my Ts are in.
     
  13. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

    Yea same here its day time when the sun rises and night when it sets.. I try not to disturb them once it's dark by turning on the light in the room they are in but soemtimes it happens.

    What is interesting is that most of my Ts will continue with whatever it is they were doing. Very few will run into there hides when the light suddenly turns on.

    Some freeze like my H.macs and some of my pokies. Some like my H.gigas and P.muts continue moving earth or roaming around.. My C.fimbriatus immediately disappears though.. Lol..

    I also agree with @cold blood.. While I believe it's beneficial I don't think it's neccesary..
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
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  14. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Hmm looks like you misquoted me, and put in your own word
     
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  15. doodleBug

    doodleBug Arachnopeon Active Member

    @Anoplogaster I figured that was the case lol So theoretically if I created a bioactive viarium for my Ts they would probably do ok in it? I'm big on making terrariums and stuff, so my slings don't just live in deli cups. I find it more fun to make them enclosures. I've had better luck with my not-so-green thumb sticking to seasons and regulating temps with my plants, especially to trigger flowering, so as long as the season fluctuation isn't anything abnormal for my Ts (eg. 40 degrees every night or something ridiculous) they should be totally fine?

    @viper69 I'm well aware the p. metallica is not from Indonesia haha Lmk if I'm misinformed, but I was under the impression that P. Metallica come from somewhere in southern India. If I recall correctly it's a small forest in Ahndra Pradesh (spelling?) although I may be confusing it with another species as some of these things tend to mush together in my memory... as stated the graph i attached "is supposed to be similar to what my current Ts would experience in the wild." This meaning that is it similar conditions, but may not the area. Sorry if I wasn't really clear on that. It's like how Tamaulipas, Mexico and Florida, USA have similar temps (at least, I have been to both places and I felt the only difference was a slightly higher humidity in Florida...). It makes sense really. They are around the same area on the equator and both edge the gulf of mexico, but they are very separate places otherwise. Not to get technical, but if you look at a world map you can see that southern India is just northwest of Indonesia, so it would make sense they too are similar, but I guess that's beside the point.

    I feel like that graph probably popped up because the climates are somewhat similar and, for whatever reason, Indonesias fluctuations have been studied more and thus better recorded.

    In terms of me being a lazy SOB I more meant it's a waste of my time to sit down and study it and do conversions and note the chart if it's no use. Why fuss over something that won't help you? The general idea so far (as you can see here and some older threads) seems to be that Ts wouldn't be affected drastically by a seasonal fluctuation so it seems I was right not to waste time fussing over the graph. Work smart, not hard my friend. ;)

    @Venom1080 @14pokies So because the room has no outside lights, the light/dark lamp should be enough of a day/night? It's on a 10/14 schedule currently, as I just prefer to err on the side of more darkness. As mentioned in my response to Anoplogaster, I enjoy making terrariums (and I also garden when the season permits). So if I made a cool little bioactive vivarium for my Ts they wouldn't really care? I think it would be a super fun project, but I feel like if they're happy doing T things in their own T way in their own little spot, why bother them and rehouse just for my own enjoyment, you know? Maybe I'll set one up (a vivarium that is) and get something else like frogs or a snake. Ohhh the ever growing collection of critters :D:D I can see how people end up with 40+ animals including Ts, snakes, fish, frogs, turtles, scorpions and more haha
     
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  16. beaker41

    beaker41 Arachnoknight

    You could probably relax a little. Personally I simply allow the natural change of seasons to regulate the temperature in my tarantula room. I don't alter their light cycle with the seasons but I do find it interesting to cycle a regular full spectrum bulb with a purely red bulb on a timer just so I can observe their nocturnal behavior.
     
  17. doodleBug

    doodleBug Arachnopeon Active Member

    My Ts are currently in an unused room of the house, but as soon as I get their setup all sorted for my room I think it would be so cool to see what they're up to. :) I love the idea of using a red light. Will any one do, like this? I hate spooking them if I need to turn on the light for something, and try to use my flashlight on my phone but unfortunately sometimes any light is a no-go to them. My parrot also sleeps in the room and any light, main, lamp or flashlight, will wake him *eyeroll* from his beauty sleep.
     
  18. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    You could not make assumptions about my state of mind too. I don't know why you think I'm not relaxed, but that's not the issue hah.

    The OP was asking about specific information that s/he obtained. I merely pointed out the information they obtained was not applicable, why, and that they should take an interest in their pets, more than we should. That's helpful, or should one suggest to the OP to use that info they posted?

    If so, let me know and I'll recommend some temps from the North Pole as reasonable data to use hahahah
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
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  19. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    You could use a red light, I used to use them. However using a blue light is far better in terms of you being able to see the Ts. We see better in the blue wavelengths, than red. There are several types of Moonlight bulbs in the herp industry that I used instead. OR, one can use a blue LED. Though w/LEDs you may need a filter as they can be quite bright.
     
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  20. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    Yeah i just use a flashlight in the otherwise dark room....the only ts that are spooked by the light are H. macs and the LVs...but theyre both incredibly reclusive and light sensitive species.

    Ive never seen a reason to alter lighting or lighting colors...red lights let you see the t, but none of the colors or patterns...so for me i just dont see the point....but thats just me.
     
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