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S. hahni

Discussion in 'True Spiders & Other Arachnids' started by MBArachnids, Jun 8, 2019.

  1. NYAN

    NYAN Arachnoprince Active Member

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    That wouldn’t surprise me. They likely use the hides nearby also. I’m sure they are opportunistic like they Loxosceles.


    That’s an interesting theory actually. With mine they eat in both cases though, though this may not necessarily mean anything as they could just eat whenever food appears also.
     
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  2. dangerforceidle

    dangerforceidle Arachnobaron Active Member

    Just as a slightly off-topic note, Sicarius hahni was moved to genus Hexophthalma in a somewhat recent revision. I believe African species are considered distinct at the genus level when compared to the South American species.
     
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  3. NYAN

    NYAN Arachnoprince Active Member

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    This is correct.
     
  4. RTTB

    RTTB Arachnoprince Active Member

    If there is a paper on it I would love to read it.
     
  5. dangerforceidle

    dangerforceidle Arachnobaron Active Member

  6. SonsofArachne

    SonsofArachne Arachnodemon Active Member

    I've seen where these spiders were called gentle or even wimps, but there's a very good evolutionary reason why they're reluctant to bite. Being a desert species they can't afford to waste body fluid, in this case venom, on defense. When they kill their prey they recover the expended fluid plus gain fluid from the prey. But a defensive bite means a loss they may never recover, which could be difference between life and death in the desert. So they would need to be under extreme duress before making a defensive bite. That being said, to anyone reading this, don't take this as a go ahead to not being careful around them. You might own a genetic anomaly that's more inclined to bite.
     
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  7. MBArachnids

    MBArachnids Arachnosquire Active Member

    Actually makes a lot of sense, considering the place they are taking me to catch some of these. (I might even get a baboon species :D They say they see them now and then, just a little closer to water, trees etc, where the S. hahni is sometimes found in literally wasteland, no trees, only sand and some small plant matter) Amazing how they adapt to survive in such harsh conditions.
     
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  8. MBArachnids

    MBArachnids Arachnosquire Active Member

    Oh and on another amazing note, the desert like conditions where they are found is scorching hot during the day but the temps drop to a super chilly evening. Might be why they bury themselves as well to get some of the heat retained in the sand? (Just a theory)
     
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  9. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I always reasoned it was due to how precious their actual venom was why they're not defensive. It's the same with prey. Sometimes they'll have a good feel before biting like they're making sure they're not about to waste it.

    They're absolutely phenomenal little spiders. Fantastic to watch at feeding time.
     
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  10. SonsofArachne

    SonsofArachne Arachnodemon Active Member

    So I gave mine a piece of cork bark Sunday as I said I would. I saw no attempt by my spider to use it until today. Today is a feeding day and I gave it roach which it killed and was feeding in the open. After observing for a while with nothing unusual happening I closed the lid, at which point it must have been disturbed, as it carried its prey under the cork bark. So if for no other reason, a minor disturbance will cause them to use a hide.
     
  11. MBArachnids

    MBArachnids Arachnosquire Active Member

    Very interesting.

    I will be going in about 5 days, i am going to try my best to keep my distance and observe one in the wild, although i will have some feeders with me to try and get a response. It might actually grab the feeder and then run to a nearby hide. :bookworm:
     
  12. NYAN

    NYAN Arachnoprince Active Member

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    I’ll have to get a pic. My male and female will hang out under the same bark sometimes.