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Question about a fat tarantula

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Timj, Oct 9, 2018.

  1. Timj

    Timj Arachnopeon

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    So yesterday night i noticed that my lasiodora parahybana looked like she was going to explode. I feed her more than all my other tarantulas not on a schedule but just when she will take them. The problem i have is she has a cave that she sits in and the way she does means i usually cant see her abdomen. She is about 4-5" give or take but my worry was what looked like a crack where her abdomen is alsmost like she was gonna pop. I am a bit worried and will definitely stop feeding her for a couple of weeks while she loses some weight. My main question was are there any significant dangers to a fat tarantula? I know about falling from a height but that should not be a problem as she does not climb and only has about 3" height to the top. And the molting situation, what can go wrong with a molt if the tarantula is to fat? Can a tarantulas abdomen just suddenly burst if its to fat? Just a run down of the real dangers would be appreciated. Impossible to get a photo unfortunately.

    She is definitely not in premolt btw as i stupidly fed her yesterday without seeing how fat she was and she took it which did not surprise me at all.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2018
  2. TownesVanZandt

    TownesVanZandt Arachnodemon Active Member

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    I´ve never heard of a tarantula who ate itself to death, but if it´s so fat as you say you should stop feeding for more than a couple of weeks.
     
  3. Timj

    Timj Arachnopeon

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    Thats what i thought as well and yeah will stop feeding her for sure. What is your opinion on feeding schedules btw or is feeding when they eat ok? Will obviously be less than i was giving her but she makes it hard to tell im feeding to much as she never refuses. I think to start i was on the powerfeeding route to bump her size up but am worried i may be giving her problems.
    Thanks
     
  4. TownesVanZandt

    TownesVanZandt Arachnodemon Active Member

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    Slings can eat as much and as often as they wish and this will help speed up their moulting frequency. How much and how often you should feed larger specimens depends on the size of the prey item and whether you feed them one or several items per feeding. Personally I feed subadults and adults either one suitable prey item per week or a couple of prey items every second week.
     
  5. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    feeding when they will eat is rarely a good schedule to follow. feeding schedules are pretty useless too. i havent followed one in years. look at the spider. if its fat (abdomen 2x plus). dont feed it. if its not. dont feed it.

    there are some exceptions to the rule. as it applies most easily to large tarantulas that dont have much or any more growing to do. smaller spiders and slings you can feed till the abdomen is easily 4x the size of the carapace. then, itll be molting soon and you should just leave it alone and wait. larger spiders i keep the abdomen no more than 2x the size of the carapace. its not going to kill the spider to be "fat", but its a waste of feeders. once its fully grown, your job for feeding for growth is done. feed now to maintain health and abdomen size. maintain being the key word.

    many tarantulas will simply never refuse prey. its up to the owner.

    powerfeeding is a misused term. it simply refers to keeping a spider warmer and feeding or heavily. it is used for faster growth. once a tarantula is near its max size, feeding so heavily should be stopped. there is no evidence it causes larger sizes or problems.

    there is no problem molting for fat tarantulas. most of the fatphobia with tarantulas coems from beginners and their anthropomorphism. it causes issues in humans. not so much in tarantulas.
     
  6. Timj

    Timj Arachnopeon

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    Thanks for the advice :)

    Ahh i see, so i dont have to worry about her insides leaking out? Thats good. And yeah i will definitely be cutting down on her feeding. I usually give superworms probably 1-2 a week which i know is a lot but its hard not to when she alwaysbtakes them down. And i should mention that for an LP she is a really slow grower which surprises me in fact my B.vagans molts more often than her and she is about 5 and a half inches? That was the reason in the first place that i bumped her feeding up but only juat realized how fat and sluggish she looked.
    Appreciate the tips btw :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2018
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  7. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Lol just know she's perfectly happy without them and she's only following instincts when she takes them down.
     
  8. Mini8leggedfreak

    Mini8leggedfreak Arachnosquire Active Member

    Not wanting to alarm you but I read something about a T being so fat that it couldn’t lift its abdomen and the abdomen would rub on the ground and it got a sore or something like that. Just a little tid bit of info.

    Obviously it’s gonna be fine bc you’re not gonna feed it till it’s smaller.
     
  9. Timj

    Timj Arachnopeon

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    actully
    Thanks for the tip that does seem very plausible. And no i am definitely not feeding her for at least 3-4 weeks.
     
  10. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    You already mentioned the fall risk.

    Drag injuries and damage to the book lungs if the T gets so fat that it can't lift its abdomen off of the ground.

    All the same things that can go wrong for a skinny tarantula. I've never had moult issues with fat slings (I let slings get as fat as they want, they put it all into growth anyway) or juvies (I've inherited some that were heinously fat).

    Probably just a bald streak, hairs don't always come off in patches, my LP sometimes looked like she'd gotten into a fight with a cat or something.

    Anyway, it's not going to just eat until it bursts or anything like that.
     
  11. RezonantVoid

    RezonantVoid Arachnosquire Arachnosupporter

    generally a T will stop eating once it is plump enough. i wouldnt be fussed, a plump T is a happy T! for your personal peace of mind though it is probably a good idea to let her lose a bit of weight before feeding again, its also a waste of money to keep feeding her