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Pro tips for H. caboverdensis

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by 14pokies, May 19, 2017.

  1. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    So I recently got stung.. By the scorpion bug.. Ya I know cheesy as hell. Anyways...
    I recently recieved one of these in a trade and there is a decent amount of conflicting information out there..Including whether they are even a valid species or just H.hottentotta.

    What I know is that they are terrestrial and should be kept primarily arid.. I understand they are potent and fast when they want to be. I hear they have a huge range throughout India, Africa,( the middle east)? and even Cape Verde.

    I hear they do enjoy a little humidity though? So any tips on substrate moisture levels, I. E..bone dry, slightly moistened and then allowed to dry completely over time or allways slightly moist?

    What about ventilation.. Do I want them in enclosires that allow for alot of ventilation or do I want them in enclosures that would allow a bit of humidity to be maintained.

    Should I provide a water dish if this is a species that actually prefers very arid conditions?

    What substrate is most suitable for this species? I will be setting it up in a small acrylic cube and would like to provide naturalistic decor.

    Lastly I hear they are parthenogenetic is this accurate? If not how do I sex them?

    If you could post pictures of your set ups for this species that would be awesome..Sorry for all the noob questions. I did research them but the article I felt that was most accurate ( allthough dreadfully vague) was in German and the translation was rough..
     
  2. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    Yay Hottentotta taxonomy. As of 2006 it was elevated to full species, but I'm sure there's still plenty of debate going on there. At the very least, specimens from Cape Verde were vouchered as H. caboverdensis, so we can reasonably say that's the correct species and then the other localities might be up in the air still.

    Anyway, down to care. They can move really quickly when they want to (typically when surprised) and don't usually hesitate to get defensive.

    A little humidity definitely helps though. You can give them a water dish every couple weeks or lightly mist one side of the enclosure once a week (if you still see water on the sides the next day, that's too much water). I think some people have had success keeping a small area moist most of the time though. They seem to be very adaptable scorps.

    They will appreciate pretty good ventilation, or at least good cross ventilation so the air doesn't get too stagnant.

    A cocofiber/sand mix should be good for them, or you can go just pure cocofiber. I'd recommend against pure sand because it'll abrade the cuticle over time and that can be a huge problem later on.

    Since this is a parthenogenetic species (regionally at least), you can pretty safely assume you have a female. Sexing would probably be done by pectine count and general shape of the tail and claws, but I don't think you'll have to worry about it.
     
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  3. callum b

    callum b Arachnosquire

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    Where did you learn about this? For sure, sand is an unsuitable substrate for some scorpions for other reasons, but it seems unlikely that it would cause huge problems due to abrasion of the cuticle. I have certainly never come across such an issue with scorpions in my care, nor have I heard or read about it from other keepers. I'm happy to be proved wrong, though (apologies if this appears a bit pompous. It's just an odd thing that I've not heard before and I'm interested in where this info. came from).
     
  4. pannaking22

    pannaking22 Arachnoking Active Member

    Certainly a valid question! I think it may actually just be a general rule for arthropods (certainly tarantulas, roaches, even desert dwelling centipedes), though there are exceptions (many darkling beetles, a couple species of roaches, and it's probably a safe bet some scorpions too). This very well could be an exception to that and pure sand may not do a darn thing to it. That said, I think it'll also depend on what type of sand you use. Unfortunately I don't know the effect of the various sands available to the hobbyist, but from what I've heard, certain types are better/worse for scorps. I'll see if I can track down a bit more info on that at least. @gromgrom, @Scorpionluva, any thoughts on this?

    Unrelated (saw it in your signature), but it's a shame that Scorpion Forum isn't up anymore. Loved learning things there and on All Scorpion Archive.
     
  5. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    Awesome thanks man! That was very helpfull..
     
  6. darkness975

    darkness975 Dream Reaper Arachnosupporter

    @14pokies

    I give all my arid Scorpions a water dish, same as I would with any of my arid Tarantulas.

    They do drink on occasion and often for am extended period.
     
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  7. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    I hear differing opinions and as far as scorpions go I'm a noob.. I have kept a few of the common LPS species and once kept an unknown species of Androctonus for a short time. I honestly was never passionate about them so I didn't do a ton of research.. I have been told that water dishes can raise the humidity to detrimental levels for some species.. I wanted to ask before I added one..

    Recently though alot of species have been catching my eye and I plan on branching out slowly.. The Genera I find myself gravitating towards are very potent.. I'm going to soak up as much knowledge as I can before I go toying with the really toxic stuff.

    I'm very used to the speed and agility of Tarantulas but from what I have seen and heard some of the hotter scorpions can move pretty fast when they want to.. I have alot of reading to do and alot of questions to ask..
     
  8. gromgrom

    gromgrom Arachnoprince Active Member

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    So Hottentotta hottentotta/caboverdensis/trilineatus can be kept like other semi arid scorpions like many Parabuthus. I tend to do pure coco or a playsand/coco mix. Everyone wants to try cali-sand for some reason. Play sand is cheaper and generally safer, especially if you wash it and bake it first.

    I tend to keep them like an Avicularia after that: plenty of ventillation, but misting 1-2 times a week. Enough to soak the soil in one corner. They'll drink it. All scorpions drink!
     
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  9. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    I like the look of some calci sand better than play sand.. I keep hearing that it's bad for scorps but no one ever says why.. Would you mind elaborating.
     
  10. gromgrom

    gromgrom Arachnoprince Active Member

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    Whether it's good or bad i dont find it worth paying the premium for a tiny bit of novelty sand nor any potential risk involved. my two cents.
     
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  11. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    I feel you on the money Lol.. It's the risk part I want to know more about..
     
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  12. darkness975

    darkness975 Dream Reaper Arachnosupporter

    Scorpions can't climb the glass so they're easier than our Tarantulas.

    A small water dish is fine it won't hurt them.
     
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  13. ArachnoDrew

    ArachnoDrew Arachnobaron Active Member

    2 of my scorpions drinking today
    A Hector and R Junceus 20170521_182445.jpg 20170521_180710.jpg
     
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  14. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince Active Member

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    I use ten inch metal tongs for all my Ts can scorpions climb them or are they to smooth as well?
     
  15. darkness975

    darkness975 Dream Reaper Arachnosupporter

    I have never had any of mine climb them. Pretty sure any smooth surface is reasonably safe.

    That being said , if there is dirt or sand caked onto the sides it could be possible.
    Overall they are far less nimble with climbing than Tarantulas. They seem to lumber about. The exception to that would be climbing species like Centruroides.
     
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  16. gromgrom

    gromgrom Arachnoprince Active Member

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    I've had pedes climb em! haha. I've also had scorpions try to climb em. No incidents yet though. They cant get a grip fast enough to be an issue, if they can even get a grip. To that end, I've had no issues with 10" tongs. Used them for over seven years now. I've consider 12" tongs, but only for tarantulas.
     
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