1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Possible fly problem in T room

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Paul1126, Mar 15, 2019 at 3:49 PM.

  1. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    Advertisement
    I have spotted a few flies chilling in my Theraphosa blondi's enclosure, no other moist enclosure seems to have any.
    I have seen a few fly around in the room as well and also lots of dead ones on the windowcill, no idea what is attracting them....
    Slightly concerned as an infestation is not good
     
  2. Vanisher

    Vanisher Arachnodemon Old Timer

    Hope they are not scuttleflues! During a few years i had terrible problems with scuttleflies. They where in the hundreds. I trapped them by putting upp flypaper with sticky glue around the terariums and in jars with small holes i put rotting meat in! The paper became black of flies in a month or so! I switched out the paper when they where full of flies. After a year or 2 i got the infastation under control. And the flies never returned. I lost some juveniles to those flies but mostly they where an nuicance!
     
  3. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    phorid flies? 2 years to get rid of an infestation? Wow, now I am worried.
    I have no idea what type of fly it is but they do kind of resemble phorid flies, what is attracting them though?
     
  4. Vanisher

    Vanisher Arachnodemon Old Timer

    Yes Phoridae! But i have never heard any with 10% of the problems i had!
     
  5. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    Did you ever find out the source of the problem? Or were they just attracted to the moist enclosures you had?
     
  6. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    Phorid flies are a royal pain to get rid of. They love dead crickets, roaches, or other feeders - or the leftover bits that don't get eaten. They will also gladly breed in any other decaying organic matter (such as fruits/veggies used to feed roaches or other non-carnivore pets) and thrive in moist enclosures. They will even invade fruit fly cultures (they seem to be able to lay eggs right through those fabric mesh vents in the "bug cup" lids) and will either devour or out-compete the fruit flies. I believe I lost a juvenile P. irminia to them once, following a bad molt. (She lost a couple of legs, and from the looks of things, they laid eggs in the stumps and used those to gain access to the rest of her body, where the maggots were able to eat her from the inside.)


    To get rid of them (or at least keep the population to a minimum) I have sticky fly traps hanging behind my cages, I try to keep the cages clean (remove and dispose of uneaten food and "bug parts" promptly), and I let the cages dry out in between waterings. I also have an army of free-range Steatoda that - based on the number of flies I find hanging in their webs - are doing their fair share to control the problem. We also started keeping our fruit fly cultures in another room - that helped a lot.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    Thanks for the response, like i said I have no idea what type of fly they are. As far as I am aware the T. blondi enclosure is clean, its basically brand new, unless he has remains in his hide I have no idea what they are being attracted to.
    I hope that I am just being paranoid, I haven't noticed lots of them yet.
     
  8. Phia

    Phia Arachnopeon Active Member

    28
    30
    18
    Texas
    Flies are an off and on problem for me, too. I found spring tails out compete them in most moist enclosures!

    I have a few types of flies that I’ve seen around my collection. One micro tiny bitty one that you never see maggots or pupae for. And the normal (harmful, imo) ones with the big maggots that have taken 1/4” slings from me. Since I deployed spring tails and remove all extra waste diligently the bad ones haven’t been an issue
     
  9. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    Nice to know this problem is quite common, thought I had done something horribly wrong.
    I am going to start setting out traps around the T. blondi enclosure tomorrow morning...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Vanisher

    Vanisher Arachnodemon Old Timer

    They came with a shipment of crickets (i think?) I bred cochroachers at that time and they infested that culture also! The flies where everywhere! Last year i had the infestation they had spread to the rest of the house! Like Chanda said, i also used flypaper. I used a flypaper that came in a roll and was around 8 inch wide. I put them in the other rooms in the house aswell. I also attatched the paper in plastic enclosures, with some small holes in the lid and moist paper and some rotting crickets or meat inside! A effective method i used was to cut up pieces of the paper, maybe 10 inch and making a roll of the papers and positioned them "standing up" on top of the tanks near the ventilation, where the flies entered. I maybe had 20 flypaper in the T room and 10 in the other rooms! Like i said, those flypapers became black with flies within a couple of weeks! I really thought i was going to loose the war against the flies, but after around 2 years i got the upper hand and got them under control! Ohh man, those flies was a real pain to get rid of!
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 5:37 PM
  11. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    One thing that might help you to differentiate between phorid flies and other flies is that the phorid flies tend to walk/run more often than fly, often running in short bursts and then pausing, giving them the nickname "scuttle flies." They can fly - they just tend not to do so as often as other common bug room pests like fungus gnats or regular fruit flies. (The flightless fruit flies that are sold/kept as feeders are, of course, also generally flightless.) Phorid flies generally have small heads and humped backs.

    See, for example: https://bugguide.net/node/view/579528 or https://bugguide.net/node/view/1514685/bgimage or https://bugguide.net/node/view/1484863/bgimage

    If you can put one under a microscope or good macro lens and get pictures of the wing venation, you can compare the pattern to the wings of fungus gnats, fruit flies, and phorid flies online. (BugGuide has a lot of good examples.)
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
  12. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    I have just been to check the room again and sadly I think these are phorid flies they tend to only fly away when I go to squish them.

    -I completed uprooted home of both true spiders to see if any remains were left inside burrows
    -Checked All moist enclosures for any uneaten food
    -Opened T. blondi enclosure and found two flies inside
    -Found flies on top of scorpions enclosure

    it seems I do have a problem with flies

    This will seriously put me off keeping species that need moisture...
     
  13. Minty

    Minty @londontarantulas Arachnosupporter

    338
    798
    108
    London
    Use sticky fly paper and add springtails to moist enclosures.
     
  14. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    I will be getting sticky fly traps and I will buy springtails, wondering if apple cider vinegar would work with phorid flies?
     
  15. Vanisher

    Vanisher Arachnodemon Old Timer

    In absens of nuclear weapons the best way is flypaper! I have tried a lot of other things!
     
  16. Minty

    Minty @londontarantulas Arachnosupporter

    338
    798
    108
    London
    No idea about the vinegar.
     
  17. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    I got a decent picture of one, all flies look similar to me but this is a gnat I think?
     

    Attached Files:

  18. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    No, vinegar does not work for phorid flies.
     
  19. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    That looks more like a fungus gnat to me. They thrive in moist environments.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Paul1126

    Paul1126 Arachnobaron Active Member

    I agree, vinegar should work for these