1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Plant ID

Discussion in 'Live Plants' started by Galapoheros, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,679
    1,364
    923
    texas
    Advertisement
    Any ideas? I throw seeds around, probably put some seeds in this barrel several months ago but I do so much of that that I have no idea what this is. I don't think it's just a weed that popped up there.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Myrmeleon

    Myrmeleon Arachnoknight

  3. AnObeseHippo

    AnObeseHippo Arachnoknight Active Member

    Maybe someone can get close but I doubt you’ll get an ID at this point unless you can list some seeds that may have gone in. Without that I think the best you may get is a genus or family until it flowers

    Probably not. A quick google image search shows me that their leaves do not look like this.


    @Galapoheros I’d try the subreddit r/whatisthisplant
    They seem pretty good at figuring that stuff out and there’s a lot more of them there that can help
     
  4. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    Your chances of ID without reproductive structures are slim to zero. I would wait until you see flowers.
     
  5. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Actually, they do. Just wait and see if it grows tendrils. (I just came back from my favorite restaurant, Passion Flower Garden, owned and operated by a couple of homespun fanatic gardeners.)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    The diversity of leaf shapes within this genus is staggering.
     
  7. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Nod nod. Growing in swampy ground the leaves can be falcate. At that restaurant they are ovate among the mulberry and aristate out in the reclaimed rice field. Their specimens basically resemble bushes, but across the river from us they are extensive vines running along a fence and into the trees. Perhaps weirdest of all is they are sun lovers, shade lovers, and will grow virtually leafless vines 20 feet long in complete darkness (as in my biddy's attic).
    Across the river the wife pointed out a plant, telling me it was Passion Flower. I called BS; it was obviously convolvulus. She picked a fruit and handed it to me. "Oh really?" :shame:
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018
    • Like Like x 1
  8. AnObeseHippo

    AnObeseHippo Arachnoknight Active Member

    Touche. Just found one that looks similar to OP’s so I’ll give you that. Nowhere near convinced until it flowers though
     
  9. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,679
    1,364
    923
    texas
    Passion flower, wow that's pretty good because I bought Passion fruit a while back, took the seeds out and I think I threw some in there. Passion fruit, MAN!, that's some good stuff but there is so little to get out of one fruit. I managed to get a shot glass full of juice out of a few, was worth it. btw I'm very familiar with passion vine, been growing a few diff species for years but I've never seen a seedling with leaves like this before, leaves should change as it matures, my prediction anyway.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2018
  10. schmiggle

    schmiggle Arachnoprince Active Member

    I would definitely wait for more characteristics before getting too excited about passionfruit. That plant could be dozens of things right now.
     
  11. AnObeseHippo

    AnObeseHippo Arachnoknight Active Member

    If you’re saying you put those seeds in there, then it is probably one of them. Enjoy
     
  12. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    From observation, if you keep passionflower vines in filtered weak sunlight they appear to grow the tendrils very early to climb towards the light. In full light it takes longer and they may never grow tendrils at all.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,679
    1,364
    923
    texas
    Do you know what species you have there?
    It is most likely to be I agree. Passiflora incarnata grows wild on a ranch I have access to, it's one I've grow but I've never germinated seed from a store-bought passion fruit before, not sure what the species is. So far it looks much different than P. incarnata. Many I've talked to here don't realize where passion fruit comes from. People are somewhat familiar with Passion vine but they assume passion fruit comes from some other plant.
     
  14. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    I seriously doubt they could be identified. They crossbreed and people have randomly planted them for the rapid growth, the fruit and or the flowers and have mixed and matched for decades. Maybe some antique with coke bottle glasses in a greenhouse at CMU could roughly ID specimens brought in with a little luck.
     
  15. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Here's one that drives people crazy. Sorry for the crappy pictures.

    How about a pomegranate tree with a passion flower vine growing in it?
    [​IMG]

    Passion flower fruit, bright glossy green, pomegranate, yellowish, dangling.
    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  16. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    8,679
    1,364
    923
    texas
    Well it has the typical lobed shaped leaves. There is a fruit hanging there the looks like a pomegranate, what is that?
     
  17. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    A pomegranate. The pomegranate tree is growing in a big pot and a volunteer passion fruit got started there as well to wind up it. I was told by the owner of the restaurant where this is growing there was also a tomato plant growing in the pot for a couple of months. People keep stealing the fruit unfortunately.