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Pet holes....what’s the draw?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by LV-426, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. LV-426

    LV-426 Arachnobaron

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    Back when my collection was way bigger than it is now I had species from NW to OW, terrestrial, fossorial, and arboreal. With the experience that I have I find that my interest have changed, especially when it comes to fossorial species. My question is what is the draw of having a tarantula that looks so awesome (H. lividium for example), but never see it for the most part? I would like to hear what y’all have to say on this subject.
     
  2. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    Ha! To be honest, this is something I ask myself all the time! I find myself getting frustrated with my pet holes. I'm just waiting for my P. vittata to hurry up and hook out (pretty sure he's male) so I can sell/trade him and free up the cage space for something a little more visible! (He is a gorgeous spider - for the 30 seconds or so that I get to see him if I sneak into the room quietly, late at night!)
     
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  3. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    What is this madness, that affects a multitude of people, that states that the spider should necessarily be visible, often visible, or visible every 5 years etc? :stop:

    Everyone is missing the sense... all 'you' have to do is admire that burrow present in a no mans land of substrate: that's the supreme reward a devoted keeper of obligate burrowers seeks :writer:
     
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  4. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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    But it’s a lovely pet hole that you cherish so much.
     
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  5. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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    You can always make your own.
     
  6. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

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    Few species are out a lot, so fossorial isn't a stretch.

    An I. mira on the other hand.. who can turn down the only known trap door terrestrial T known to science

     
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  7. Teal

    Teal Arachnoemperor Old Timer

    As in, a photo of me with a jar of dirt (aka pet hole)?! I can do that. Lol
     
  8. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    The advantage to pet holes is that they can be much cheaper than visible spiders, and easier to maintain, too. You know you're never going to see the spider anyway, so just slap a label on a cage full of dirt and pretend there's a spider under there.
     
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  9. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnotank Arachnosupporter

    Occasionally they pop out to offer free hugs but, due to their crap eyesight, they often pop out facing the wrong direction.

     
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  10. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    There's a Haploclastus that does the same. Or one of those Asian fossorials. I know it's true cause I saw it on Facebook.
     
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  11. FrDoc

    FrDoc Arachnobaron Active Member

    A430750D-0CBF-4189-8148-5C7EF7D4D139.jpeg I used to have the same thought, Why? Then I bought my first, a P. muticus (because I wanted to be like @Chris LXXIX), and I got one as a freebie in the deal, the H. himalayana pictured. I have not seen the PM since day one, except for her little orange feet at the bottom of entrance to her burrow as she awaits the offering. The HH is much more gregarious. I see it almost every day (I took this picture this morning). So, it is a matter of the specimen, just like the complaints we see so often about not seeing their arboreals (I see this HH as often as I see my P. ornata), or their terrestrials webbing themselves up inside their hides. You pays your money, and you takes your chances. I have come to enjoy the suspense of a sighting, not to mention watching them work like little eight-legged miners, and the fact that they are some of the coolest looking T’s to be found, e.g., coloration, body types, size. Yeah, I used to think, Why? However, now I have come to really appreciate them. In fact, I await the arrival tomorrow of my “Merry Christmas to me” package that will include H. schmidti (gold), and H. gigas. Can’t wait!
     
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  12. Nightstalker47

    Nightstalker47 Arachnoking Active Member

    You must be thinking of Haploclastus validus(Robust Trapdoor Tarantula).
     
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  13. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnonovelist Arachnosupporter

    I want to make a "fossorial" tarantula enclosure so that the cage is narrow enough to provide a window into the burrow. I think it's called a Lund cage. Actually, I'm sure I'll just custom order one from the guy that sells acrylic cages at my local monthly reptile show.
     
  14. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    When I rehouse my M. balfouri I'm thinking about attaching a sheet of black foam on the outside of the tank, to make a "window" that I can open and hopefully see into their burrows - if they cooperate and dig near the glass where the foam is blocking out the light.
     
  15. PhilMcWonder

    PhilMcWonder Arachnoknight

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    If a burrower's enclosure is set up right you may still be able to see them. The coolest enclosures are the ones where the T builds long tunnels right on the glass. Plus the T may indeed come out every now and again. I think the main draw of fossorial species is setting up the perfect enclosure and those rare moments when they grace you with their presence. I rarely see my scorpion, but I love it when he is out and about wandering the enclosure.

    I think the best enclosure for a burrowing T would be something tall, but narrow, with lots of substrate. That way they are more likely to tunnel on the glass.

    I understand how fossorial Ts aren't for everyone. If you are worried that you will never see your T it may be better to go with a different type of T altogether. But keep in mind that most fossorial Ts DO leave their burrows every now and again.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
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  16. Mirandarachnid

    Mirandarachnid Arachnobaron

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    I love mine (C. schmidti) because it's such a treat when I do see it. I mostly just see it's front legs, but I got to see the whole spider last night :woot:

    Also, you never know how a particular individual is going to act. I thought my M. robustum would be a pet hole, but I see it every day.
     
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  17. Teal

    Teal Arachnoemperor Old Timer

    1547074246671.jpg

    There. Solved that. :hilarious:
     
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  18. I love my I.mira for the feeding response. I’ve always been fascinated with the trap door behaviour(also have a small trapdoor spider)

    Most of the year it is just a container with dirt but it’s worth it to see it for 20 seconds.
    It’s also a bit of a surprise situation when you go to rehouse a spider U think is 2” but is actually 4 1/2”
     
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  19. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    You are a splendid person and this statement gave me strenght and stamina... one day I would be like @Chris LXXIX myself! :)
     
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  20. korg

    korg Arachnobaron Active Member

    The whole "pet hole" thing is kind of overblown in my opinion. Spiders can hide a lot whether they're fossorial or not... I'm sure many people here can think of arboreal tarantulas in their collections that they rarely if ever see out. I've never had a problem seeing my fossorial species (Ephebopus, Hysterocrates, Selenocosmia, etc) if I want to have a look into the enclosure... give them starter burrows near the glass! They will burrow right down the side. Many times they tunnel around the bottom of the enclosure or make little caves for themselves. If they're hungry you often see them at least partially at the entrance of their burrows. They're more active at night... you might even be able to observe them digging around! Not every tarantula sits in one spot out in the open all the time, but I don't think it makes them any less interesting and worthwhile. Perhaps even the opposite, in my opinion!
     
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