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Panarthropoda.de /.org /.info New website about Scorpions, Whips Spiders, Mantids

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Frederic S., Aug 25, 2011.

  1. Frederic S.

    Frederic S. Arachnopeon

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    Hi everybody,

    I'm proud to present you our new website that is mostly translated in English now:

    Panarthropoda.de
    Panarthropoda.org
    Panarthropoda.info

    This site will be updated regularly and will provide you with:

    -A large array of high quality pictures of Scorpions, Whip Spiders, Mantids and others...
    -detailed care sheets
    -general informations about the biology of these fascinating creatures

    I will announce major updates in this thread every time they occur.

    So have fun visiting the site. Feedback is welcome!

    regards

    Frederic
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Frederic S.

    Frederic S. Arachnopeon

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    Hi everybody,

    I’m glad to announce our update on panarthropoda.de/info/org

    Many informations and nice photos were added:

    Texts about:

    1. The order of the scorpions
    2. Their outer morphology and anatomy,
    3. Mating, prenatal development and birth in scorpions
    4. The order of the pseudoscorpions

    Photos of:

    Scorpions: Babycurus jacksoni, Belisarius xambeui, Chactas keyserlingi, Chaerilus celebensis, Euscorpius alpha und E. italicus mit Jungtieren, Orthochirus scrobiculosus negebensis with youngs, Parabuthus transvaalicus, Uroplectes fischeri, U. flavoviridis, U. gracilior, U. olivaceus, U. otjimbinguensis, U. triangulifer, U. vittatus

    Whip Spiders: Phrynus goesii and P. longipes with youngs

    Most texts are now available in English. The rest will also be translated.

    And last but not least: panarthropoda now has an charming icon referring to our jumping spider in the banner ; ).

    Regards

    Your Panarthropoda Team
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    Hey guys,

    since the beginning of this year there has been some little updates to the gallery, namely a few pictures of 2 species of Opisthacanthus and Orthochirus scrobiculosus negebensis ;)

    If you want to stay up to date you can always subscribe our RSS feed.

    Regards
    Finn
     
  4. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    Hey guys!

    Panarthropoda has it's first birthday this month and to celebrate I have just uploaded a humongous update to the gallery including 124 new pictures. In addition, we now have pictures of more than 100 species of scorpion in the gallery!

    The update includeds pictures of: Bothriurus bonariensis brown and red, B. cf. rochensis, Buthus paris, Cetruroides vittatus, Euscorpius germanus, E. spec. Gardasee, Hottentotta spec. Uganda, Iurus kraepelini, Nebo grandis, Opisthacanthus rugiceps, Opistophthalmus capensis, O. species Süd-Afrika, Pandinus ugandaensis, Rhopalurus crassicauda, Smeringurus mesaensis, Tityus bahiensis, T. confluens, T. magnimanus, T. trivittatus, T. zulianus, Uroplectes variegatus.

    Have fun with the pictures and please let me know if you find any copy paste mishaps!

    Regards
    Finn
     
  5. tdark1

    tdark1 Arachnoknight Arachnosupporter

    Finn,

    That is a great site, however, looking at it could easily make one jealous!! I have it bookmarked now!

    Cheers,

    Rob
     
  6. Hornets inverts

    Hornets inverts Arachnobaron

    Great site guys, keep up the great work :)
     
  7. Finn says, 'The update includeds pictures of: Bothriurus bonariensis brown and red, B. cf. rochensis, Buthus paris, Cetruroides vittatus, Euscorpius germanus, E. spec. Gardasee, Hottentotta spec. Uganda, Iurus kraepelini, Nebo grandis, Opisthacanthus rugiceps, Opistophthalmus capensis, O. species Süd-Afrika, Pandinus ugandaensis, Rhopalurus crassicauda, Smeringurus mesaensis, Tityus bahiensis, T. confluens, T. magnimanus, T. trivittatus, T. zulianus, Uroplectes variegatus.' and says have fun with the pictures!:rolleyes::D

    I am going to the site right now. Cannot wait! Nice work, Frederic and Finn!
     
  8. I love this site, the pictures are always quite stunning!
     
  9. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    Thanks for the nice responses, guys!

    Regards
    Finn
     
  10. You guys got a lot of new species! Are these yours, Finn? Heiko's? Frederic's? Or do you trade between each other?

    By the way, T. trivittatus...one of my most desired species! Not to mention R. laticauda and the others...
     
  11. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    The new species are from a friend of ours (with exception of Iurus and Opisthacanthus, those are Heiko's) who send the hole lot to Heiko for photographing ;)
    Me and Fred have some new species (Mostly Centruroides and *drumroll* Uroplectes schlechteri), but they are not photographed yet, because most are still to young to allow proper pictures. (See stock list)

    Regards
    Finn
     
  12. Sigyn

    Sigyn Arachnopeon

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    Nicely made .... i must say very friendly
     
  13. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    Hi guys,

    since questions about the visual sensitivity of scorpions arose quite frequently in the last weeks, I decided to write a text about the topic at hand: The eyes of the scorpion.
    The whole topic will be rounded off by another text about the colour reception and the fluorescence of scorpions, soon to come.

    All the best
    Finn
     
  14. Hi Finn,

    Great work! Very interesting and helpful to read. Good luck with the other paper, and I'll be looking forward to it.

    Cordially,
    Tuhin
     
  15. Olsin

    Olsin Arachnoknight

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    Thumbs up from me to .. Some excellent pictures and info .. Damn good work guys ;)
     
  16. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    Thanks you two!
     
  17. Johnny Spadix

    Johnny Spadix Arachnoknight Active Member

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    Helle everyone :)

    Finn, this is a very beautiful professional website about scorpions and some other animals.
    Beautiful pictures and helping information ;-)!

    lg

    Alex
     
  18. Olsin

    Olsin Arachnoknight

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    Hey Finn ... I've been reading your explanation of the SIDN numbers you assign scorps based on their location of origin.....As far as i can understand you would assign the young of 2 pure line species (location known) a "M" prefix donating it as mixed.
    It's this point i'm a little confused with because the M prefix also suggests unknown location.
    Your example of SIDN 0003-R and SIDN 0004-R producing young being given a SIDN number as xxxx-M makes sense but wouldn't it be better if some kind of reference pointed back to the pure line parents...Something like SIDN 0003/4-N (Neu)..or whatever.

    My confusion comes from you using the M prefix to donate both mixed lines and unknown lines.
     
  19. snippy

    snippy Arachnobaron

    Thanks for the kind words, Alex!

    The mixed lines are simply for anything that is not pure, Den. So unknown location (because you can not trace it back properly and differentiating between them bears not much value) and mixed parents mainly. Granted, the name "mixed" suggests otherwise and this has caused some confusion in the german boards as well :)

    Of course it would be somewhat nice to have a reference to the parental lines, but that would be a monumental effort, because I would have to incorporate what every breeder does with his/her animals. The way the numbers are now, I only have to factor in the pure lines really and they are free of what breeders do.
    Breeders are free to save the data on the lines of the parental generations of their animals, but that is only of little interest to me. I care to represent the situation that exists in nature, which is lost anyway if someone breeds two lines from geologically separate places.

    Regards
    Finn
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2012
  20. Olsin

    Olsin Arachnoknight

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    Ok, thats logical ... But you still lose the heritage of young by classing them with the M prefix....For example a male P.villosus from South Africa that mated with a female P.villosus from Namibia would produce mixed young...Thats fine...but there's still no way to trace the heritage of the young back to their parents and the M prefix could just as easily mean that their heritage is unknown when in fact it isn't.

    I understand that you are only interested in tracking pure line and i also agree that that represents nature .. but as a tool for tracking heritage it comes up short because as soon as a scorp has been given the M prefix all knowledge of it's background is lost....Generation after generation after generation of pure line would be lost if just one M classed mating took place and considering there's many people that actually try to find 2 unrelated scorps to mate to increase the vigor of the young, all pure lined scorps would eventually be lost along with a record of their heritage.

    Still, it's a good piece of work you have done Finn and i'm not trying to pick holes in it..I guess i would just have tried to have done it a bit differently if i had thought of that system......which i didn't ;), so kudos to you for doing it..

    Regards
    Den.