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Pamphobeteus antinous Soil

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by Gillian Pajor, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Hey everyone,

    So I've looked around the website and it seems the last post on this taranutla was like 2009 so I'm going to break that cause I need help.

    I am slowly paying off this taranutla (pay 20$-40$ a week so I know its mine but I have time to set up its cage properly) because I hear that most people (from what I have read on this site) use Peat soil for the dirt on the ground for this wonderful tarnatula to live on. Can ANYONE tell me where to find this? I went to a locate green house, Lowes, Home Depot and even Walmart but they all have chemicals to help plants grown and I am worried that it will do damage to her. Can anyone help me, if not with the Peat soil but at least inform me of something I can use?? I have a bunch of compacted coconut husk/fiber that I could seperate and use but I don't know if it will be okay with this speices. Any information will help!

    gillian
     
  2. KezyGLA

    KezyGLA Arachnoking Active Member

    Hey

    You dont need to use peat at all. Eco earth or coco fibre will do this species just fine. Just moisten it now and then.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    thank you, and should it be 3 inches or so packed down or loose?
     
  4. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    Depends on the cage being used. Gap between sub and lid shouldn't be more than 2x the spiders legspan.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    The leg span is 4 inches and we are planning on using a 10 gallon tank. I just don't know if it can be loose or if it needs to be packed down
     
  6. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoking Active Member

    It should be packed down.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  7. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Thank you!
     
  8. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    I personally mix sphagnum moss into my coconut fiber for my Pamphobeteus. A bag is cheap and goes a long way. It's not necessary, you'll be fine without it, but I find it takes and holds moisture really well.

    [​IMG]
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Are those real flowers?
     
  10. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Nope! They're fake. I use fake flowers or leaves in a lot of my enclosures. Tarantulas will incorporate them sometimes into their hides or their "renovations" and they add some variety and looks for my aesthetic appeal.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. RemyZee

    RemyZee Arachnosquire Active Member

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    Those are GORGEOUS enclosures!! *drool*
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Well thank you, I appreciate the compliment.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. sasker

    sasker Arachnoknight Active Member

    They also like to dig when they are smaller. I think 3" should be fine.
     
    • Clarification Please Clarification Please x 1
  14. sasker

    sasker Arachnoknight Active Member

    What's there to clarify? Pamphobeteus sp tend to dig tunnels when they are not mature yet and I think a layer of at least 3 inches of substrate should be provided to allow juveniles to do so. Pack it down tightly as you would with any other tarantula and you will have a happy spider. The larger they get, the more they hang out in the open.
     
  15. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    I never really had a Pamph burrow and they have rarely even used hides.

    Op, the sub you use is purely your personal choice....all work.

    Peat is by far the lightest and fluffiest...like its hard to pack down, but its easy to burrow in for them. Its also a cheap alternative, probably the second cheapest option. The bad thing is that when dry, its very hydrophobic....it can take days for it to soak in, but once it does, it holds miosture very well, id say the best.

    Eco earth, coco fiber, jungle mix, etc., are light, but not as light as peat...looks nice, holds moisture well and absorbs it quickly. Its the most expensive, but that only matters for significant collections. It tamps down very nice and tight...its the industry standard used by most.

    Or you can buy cheap additive free top soil....its by far the cheapest alternative. Its dense, so it shouldnt be tamped down (it will form to a brick), the downside to that density is that its by far the heaviest...but imo that really only matters in enclosures with deep substrate. It absorbs water quickly, but doesnt hold it for the extended periods that the others do. I think it looks the best and most natural, but thats my personal preference.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    Okay now I have another problem. Thank God I don't have spider just yet...but there is now mold in cage. Temp is 75 and humidity is 80. Cage is in room with light on 13 hours a day can someone help me?
     
  17. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    Can we see a picture? To me it sounds like your ventilation might not be adequate.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  18. cold blood

    cold blood ArachnoGod Active Member

    1. Temps dont need to be dead on or even consistent....night temps to 68 are fine....as are day temps to 90. Thats a lot of room to work within.

    2. Dont measure humidity. Its as simple as keeping part of the sub damp....when it dries, just add water. The effects of low ambient humidity is simply the addition of more water, more frequently. Measuring it within specific enclosure is not only pointless, but can cause issues if one is too reliant on specific numbers.

    3. Ts have no light requirements....on top of that, if theyre getting sunlight from a window, move the ts away from it...you dont want it to be a greenhouse.
     
  19. Sana

    Sana Arachnoprince Active Member

    How much mold? If it's small spots I clean out the individual patches with a spoon so I get some of the sub from around it. If the whole enclosure is fuzzy there are likely ventilation issues or your sub had an issue before you put it in the enclosure. Learning to balance humidity and ventilation for my tropicals was a challenge for me. I don't generally have issues these days but now and again something gets missed and I have to remove a patch.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Gillian Pajor

    Gillian Pajor Arachnopeon Active Member

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    this is the picture of the mold.
     

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