1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

New York millipedes?

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by Elleken, May 1, 2009.

  1. Elleken

    Elleken Arachnoknight

    277
    0
    0
    CNY
    Advertisement
    So I went out bug/spider hunting today and found some pretty large millipedes. They seem to be dark purple with red in between their segments. I know they are fairly common just wanted to know what the species may be and if anyone would be interested in them. Also found plenty of what i assume to be another species of millipedes. They were flatter with less legs and yellow between their segments.
     
  2. Rick McJimsey

    Rick McJimsey Arachnoprince Arachnosupporter

    The latter sp. might be Apheloria sp., maybe virginiensis
     
  3. Miss Bianca

    Miss Bianca Arachnoprince

  4. Elleken

    Elleken Arachnoknight

    277
    0
    0
    CNY
  5. Elleken

    Elleken Arachnoknight

    277
    0
    0
    CNY
    About an hour south from syracuse. Cortland... if you know where that is haha.
     
  6. pouchedrat

    pouchedrat Arachnolord Old Timer

    613
    58
    768
    MD
    I do (grew up in central/upstate NY, about 45 minutes from Syracuse). I was completely unaware they that species of millipede there in NY! I used to search for inverts constantly as a kid and even this past week while on vacation up there I was turning over logs and such and seeing what I could find (just a TON of isopods, one small centipede, and some eggsac of some sort).

    That's really awesome though.. There WERE a mess of baby millipedes of some unknown species that were all either in the middle of molts, or ending them, so I didn't want to disturb them but more than likely they were those tiny black ones.
     
  7. Rick McJimsey

    Rick McJimsey Arachnoprince Arachnosupporter

    Sound right for the 2nd species?
     
  8. Elleken

    Elleken Arachnoknight

    277
    0
    0
    CNY
    Yea that would be it for the second species as well. I only started noticing them about a year ago. As far as the first species goes for finding them.. me and my dad split wood at the end of the summer for the house so we find tons of them. I mean tons! I just went out to the wood pile and flipped some bark over and found one so I figured I'd ask about it finally. As far as inverts go here though other than these its pretty lame collecting here.
     
  9. Elleken

    Elleken Arachnoknight

    277
    0
    0
    CNY
    Figured I'd take some pictures to be sure.



    First one I was talking about.
    [​IMG]

    Second species I was talking about.
    [​IMG]

    What I assume to be the second species again only this time a lighter color?
    [​IMG]
     
    • Love Love x 1
  10. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince

    Hey guys I found the same species as the one in the OP's the second pic.. .
    Location is Niagara county Western NY. I would love an Id if anyone can help.

    Heres a pic of my youngest interacting with it before we released it.
    20180602_155846.jpg
     
  11. davehuth

    davehuth Arachnosquire Active Member

    Nice looking millipede! :) Here in western NY we have a couple of Xystodesmids, this one in your photo most closely resembles our Sigmoria (Rudiloria) trimaculata trimaculata. They're a wonderful species (they fluoresce brightly under UV light!). I'm trying to learn how to keep them happy in captivity. If you try, they're a surface active species – especially at night if you keep them on the cool side with a light nightly mist of water. Have fun exploring out there!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  12. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince

    Great info bro thanks! I had never sean one like that so I put it back under it's rock.. I wanted to keep it but I wasn't sure how rare they are, I didn't want to disrupt the population.. If they are a common species I would deffinately keep a close eye out for them. They are really cool looking and I would love to keep a few..
     
  13. davehuth

    davehuth Arachnosquire Active Member

    Native millipedes are under-studied, so who knows how their populations are distributed? I'm not far away from you (Allegany County) and they're very common here. Always tricky to keep most flat-backed millipedes. So far the Rudiloria I keep cool (65 to 70 degrees) are doing the best. I give them a deep-ish substrate (3 to 4 inches), with lots of decomposing hardwood and decomposing leaves. Still looking for supplemental foods to give as treats, though I did see one munching on fresh moss once. I see them mating often, which may be a sign that their conditions are ok. I've been keeping them for only several months, so you may want to keep them for a little while and then release them since there's no guarantee any of my advice will work long term. Good luck, and keep us updated here!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. 14pokies

    14pokies Arachnoprince

    Allegany state park is gourgous.. Your lucky to live so close.. I take my kids there at least once during the summer.. If I lived closer I would probably build a moss hut somewhere in there and have my brats sled me in food and supplys ;)..

    I would never be able to keep them if they need cooler temps. I don't run an A/C so my house is mid 80's-90 during the summer. Where we found that one it was very low lying, next to a creek with lots of tree cover so yea it deffinately makes sence that they like it cool and pretty moist..

    You have been a big help, Thanks again..
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. MarcoVincelli

    MarcoVincelli Arachnosquire

    50
    6
    8
    USA
    I would love to get my hands on some polydesmid millipedes. They aren’t really around here where I live. They are the only ones I can’t definitely get haha.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. davehuth

    davehuth Arachnosquire Active Member

    A number of people here on the boards have been trying to untangle the mysteries of polydesmid husbandry for some time. I've begun experimenting this year as well, and there seems to be a variety of needs between genera and even species. Some species, such as Euryurids, seem more hardy. The colorful, showy Xystodemids have proven especially challenging. We're working on it! :)