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New to Tarantulas!

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by Daniel266jz, Oct 26, 2017.

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    UPDATE: I was able to cancel my order and I have all my supplies ready I just need to order the right tarantula from the right place.
     
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  2. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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    Awesome!!! You should check out Jamie’s Tarantulas for sure!
     
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  3. I did check there but other than brachypelma Boehmei i have no idea which are good. The utricating hairs as some have mentioned have kind of threw me a little off on getting one of those.
     
  4. BoyFromLA

    BoyFromLA ‎٩(ˊᗜˋ*)و Arachnosupporter

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    Currently I ordered 1/2” Mexican Red Knee sling from there, and I am looking forward to get a same size Green Bottle Blue sling from there as well. I think I am in love with new world terrestrial tarantulas.
     
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  5. I might just get a red knee from them also since you said you have. I really would like to start with it. What are your plans for sling care? Another thing is they grow wayyy slow i heard.
     
  6. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnobaron Active Member

    Brachypelma hairs aren't even bad (unless you're one of the unlucky people that actually has a reaction to them). Saying that, true to my form of getting defective tarantulas, my boehmei hasn't kicked hairs once and isn't even really that skittish, could change as it gets bigger though.

    As for good starter tarantulas:

    - Pretty much any Brachypelma species. B. albopilosum is the calmest and one of the fastest growing out of the genus, emilia/hamorii/albiceps/boehmei/klassi/smithi are all lookers but slower growing, the whole genus is pretty bulletproof care-wise and pretty easy to deal with.
    - Grammostola pulchripes. Pretty bulletproof care-wise, one of the faster growers of the genus, gets big (7-8") and has a decent appetite.
    - Grammostola pulchra. If you can find one and have money to burn (unfortunately, because absolutely everyone has to have one :rolleyes: but is too impatient to raise them themselves there is more demand than supply and getting anything other than slings is a pain in the arse and expensive, the fact that slings fetch a similar price to actaeon/iheringi here is a joke), bulletproof care-wise, get to a decent size and look great but are slow-growing and do fast sometimes.
    - Aphonopelma chalcodes. Really underrated species, pretty bulletproof care-wise, they're quite pretty, can be a bit of a mixed bag temperament-wise (for every calm one there's a crazy one, or so it seems) but they're pretty easy to deal with, readily available and dirt cheap (even as adults).
    - Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. Gorgeous, eat like tanks, grow like weeds (my female went from 2cm to about 4 inches in a little over a year), web like crazy (if you like that), really easy to care for, just bear in mind that this species is pretty fast and can be skittish/defensive
     
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  7. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    I'd also recommend checking out Arachnoiden. I just got my second order from them, and so far I'm totally impressed. The first order was for five Pamphobeteus, and they gave me another type of Pamphobeteus as a freebie. Which is a big deal because Pamphobeteus slings are not cheap. To get one as a freebie? Whoa! This time I got two freebies. An H. incei (gold) and a Nhandu tripepii. Their customer service is great, they have quite a large variety to choose from, orders over $200 ship free, and they give out quality freebies. They weren't tiny specimens either. The N. tripepii is just under an inch and the H. incei is about the same size.

    [​IMG]

    How pretty, right?
     
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  8. UPDATE: I went to Fearnottarantulas.com and ordered myself a 1.5" Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens! Which I have everything ready and is not as small as most slings would be which is great. It should be here tuesday morning!!!
     
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  9. She is here! Suspect female which is great here are some pics!
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Ant

    Ant Arachnopeon

    I was going to comment on your enclosure errors but it seems they've been covered by others. I am curious as to who told you that GBB's are Old World tarantulas though . . . ?
     
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  11. It was a fellow chameleon enthusiast who also has many tarantulas. I asked her and she told me that GBB we’re old world and to stay away...
     
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  12. Ant

    Ant Arachnopeon

    And here you are with a GBB as your first T! Haha, maybe she got confused with OBT?
     
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  13. Yea Lolol they’re just too amazing I couldn’t resist not starting with this GBB and hopefully she is a female. I have no ideas she might have??
     
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  14. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    I can see why people would think that. Anyone who's done a -little- research, but not a -lot- of research might confuse all the colorful tarantulas for more potent ones. It does happen in nature-- flashier colors = stay the heck away. GBBs, fortunately, are NW and I don't think their venom is even elevated like that of a Psalmo. I do believe I've heard their urticating hairs are a nightmare, however. So even if the T isn't in the enclosure, never spot clean with your fingers. They lay down their urticating hairs in their webbing to create a sort of...barbed netting effect. Ingenious, really.
     
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  15. Thank you for letting me know. That saves me from that mistake lol. How potent is their venom? I heard bee sting?
     
  16. Nightshady

    Nightshady Arachnopeon Active Member

    Congrats man!! I recently got a 1.5" GBB sling myself.
     
  17. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince Active Member

    A lot of people like to say "bee sting" because most people know what that's like. Plenty of people have been stung by a bee at least once. But they're different insects with different venom-composition. Add to that the fact that people have different pain thresh holds and no one can give you a good comparison. As far as severity goes, however, it's not far from a bee sting. Unless you're allergic to the venom bees produce, which would obviously give you a worse reaction. I've read about the discussion of whether or not someone can be allergic to tarantula venom and I BELIEVE someone proved it'd be very hard, given that the "stuff" that produces allergic reactions isn't found in tarantula venom. Can't remember if I'm right or wrong however, and not sure where to find the discussion again. Tarantula venom is some tricky stuff. They experimented with tarantula venom's affect on mice, and the venom that killed those mice fastest? Grammostola rosea.

    It'll hurt. You'll itch, experience mechanical damage from the actual fangs, your joints might get achey and you might have a mild fever. But you'll definitely live, just fine.
     
  18. darkness975

    darkness975 a Dream Within a Dream Arachnosupporter

    @Daniel266jz You shouldn't use common names like "Mexican red knee." That could mean any one of a dozen or so separate species. Using the scientific name is best.
     
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  19. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnobaron Active Member

    You already covered it in your later post but the mechanical damage of the bite itself will be worse than the effects of the venom (unless you have a bad reaction but there's still some uncertainty as to whether or not you can even be allergic to tarantula venom, you'd have to get bitten more than once for it to happen anyway), the venom will most like cause nothing more than a bit of itching, swelling and redness around the area of the bite.

    I wouldn't know about the hairs as I've only ever seen my girl kick hairs once when she was smaller (she's more the "tag and run" type) and I use 10" tongs when spot cleaning (I got them in the same order as my A. geniculata, I kinda value the use of my fingers lol).
     
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  20. Sure thing!